Marine Conservation Forum United Arab Emirates Abu Dhabi, 14 September 2006 WWF - LAC Marine Turtle Program Carlos D - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Marine Conservation Forum United Arab Emirates Abu Dhabi, 14 September 2006 WWF - LAC Marine Turtle Program Carlos D PowerPoint Presentation
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Marine Conservation Forum United Arab Emirates Abu Dhabi, 14 September 2006 WWF - LAC Marine Turtle Program Carlos D
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Marine Conservation Forum United Arab Emirates Abu Dhabi, 14 September 2006 WWF - LAC Marine Turtle Program Carlos D

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    1. Good afternoon! My name is Mario Gonzlez and I welcome you to Costa Rica and its marine turtles. I will give you an overview of marine turtle conservation issues and of the some of the ways to help these amazing voyagers of the oceans. Marine turtles are worth conserving in their own right. But they serve as as an umbrella to address a wide range of marine conservation issues, as we will see today.Good afternoon! My name is Mario Gonzlez and I welcome you to Costa Rica and its marine turtles. I will give you an overview of marine turtle conservation issues and of the some of the ways to help these amazing voyagers of the oceans. Marine turtles are worth conserving in their own right. But they serve as as an umbrella to address a wide range of marine conservation issues, as we will see today.

    2. Good afternoon! My name is Mario Gonzlez and I welcome you to Costa Rica and its marine turtles. I will give you an overview of marine turtle conservation issues and of the some of the ways to help these amazing voyagers of the oceans. Marine turtles are worth conserving in their own right. But they serve as as an umbrella to address a wide range of marine conservation issues, as we will see today.Good afternoon! My name is Mario Gonzlez and I welcome you to Costa Rica and its marine turtles. I will give you an overview of marine turtle conservation issues and of the some of the ways to help these amazing voyagers of the oceans. Marine turtles are worth conserving in their own right. But they serve as as an umbrella to address a wide range of marine conservation issues, as we will see today.

    5. Coastal & Marine Challenges Coastal development Unsustainable resource use Wasteful fisheries (bycatch) Climate change

    6. Coastal Development

    7. Unsustainable resource use

    8. Wasteful fisheries (bycatch)

    9. Climate change

    10. Marine turtles: an unusual reptile

    16. This is particularly true for developing countries, which are the countries where most marine turtles occur. For five of the seven species of marine turtle, more than 77% of the countries where they occur are countries with developing economies. This is particularly true for developing countries, which are the countries where most marine turtles occur. For five of the seven species of marine turtle, more than 77% of the countries where they occur are countries with developing economies.

    17. Conversely, of 163 developing countries, 110 have one or more species of marine turtle and over 60% have two species or more. It is clear that the future of marine turtles depend on use and conservation in countries with developing economies. Also, the potential of marine turtles to contribute to economic and social development is greatest in developing countries. For these reasons, our main objectives in this study are to quantify the economic values of marine turtles in developing countries around the world, suggest actions to achieve long-term economic benefits to human societies and simultaneously recover depleted marine turtle populations. Today, we share with you the preliminary results of a study we hope to complete by May this year. We hope to nourish the final version of the report and would welcome your feedback. One of us will be available at the WWF booth throughout the week to receive your comments. Conversely, of 163 developing countries, 110 have one or more species of marine turtle and over 60% have two species or more. It is clear that the future of marine turtles depend on use and conservation in countries with developing economies. Also, the potential of marine turtles to contribute to economic and social development is greatest in developing countries. For these reasons, our main objectives in this study are to quantify the economic values of marine turtles in developing countries around the world, suggest actions to achieve long-term economic benefits to human societies and simultaneously recover depleted marine turtle populations. Today, we share with you the preliminary results of a study we hope to complete by May this year. We hope to nourish the final version of the report and would welcome your feedback. One of us will be available at the WWF booth throughout the week to receive your comments.

    21. The good news: Conservation works!

    23. FUNDAMENTAL NEEDS Subsistence Protection Affection Liberty Understanding Creation Participation Leisure Identity Transcendence SATISFIERS

    24. Money talks: how much is a marine turtle worth? The global analysis around the tropics reveals that a marine turtle is worth more alive than dead. Your expenses during your visit to Costa Rica are your contribution to increase the value of marine turtles. The global analysis around the tropics reveals that a marine turtle is worth more alive than dead. Your expenses during your visit to Costa Rica are your contribution to increase the value of marine turtles.

    33. But adult turtles need protection at sea. WWF is working to reduce bycatch. Here you see a J-Hook and a Circle Hook In the North Atlantic, these circle hooks have proven very effective at reducing by as much as 70% the longline bycatch of sea turtles, while maintaining catches of target species. Additional measures to reduce turtle catch are the use of fish bait instead of squid bait. If turtles do get hooked, the use of de-hookers and a safe release gives them a good chance of surviving. WWF is working to introduce these measures in various places, including the Eastern Pacific coast of Latin America. But adult turtles need protection at sea. WWF is working to reduce bycatch. Here you see a J-Hook and a Circle Hook In the North Atlantic, these circle hooks have proven very effective at reducing by as much as 70% the longline bycatch of sea turtles, while maintaining catches of target species. Additional measures to reduce turtle catch are the use of fish bait instead of squid bait. If turtles do get hooked, the use of de-hookers and a safe release gives them a good chance of surviving. WWF is working to introduce these measures in various places, including the Eastern Pacific coast of Latin America.

    34. A teams work Region-wide collaborative work (8 countries) Industry, artisanal sector, Fishing Authorities, NGOs from: Mexico: Miguel Cisneros & Co. Guatemala: Sara Perez & Co. El Salvador: Sonia Salaverria & Co. Costa Rica: M. Mug, A. Segura, S. Andraka & Co. Panama: Lucas Pacheco. Colombia: Luis Zapata, Lilian Barreto & Diego Amorocho Ecuador: Martin Hall, Erick Largacha & Co. Peru: Michael Valqui & Co. Partners: IATTC, NOAA, USAID, US State Department, WCPFC, Japan, Ocean Conservancy, Mustad, Packard, Royal Caribbean, OSPESCA Oversight and coordination: Global Marine Program and Global Species Program (Robin Davies) Miguel Jorge, Moises Mug, Carlos Drews, Kimberly Davis Scientific and technical support: Martin Hall (IATTC)

    35. The largest marine fisheries conservation project in LAC Our policy work (RFMO & Fishing Authorities) IATTCs bycatch related resolutions MoU between WWF and OSPESCA (Central American Fisheries And Aquaculture Organization) to promote sustainable fisheries: by-catch mitigation as a priority area of collaboration (September 2005).

    36. More than 60,000 J hooks replaced by circle hooks and experiments with onboard observers completed in all countries. More than 300 fishermen have participated in experiments and many more in training workshops. Working relationships established with NOAA and with the world biggest fishing gear provider, the Norwegian company Mustad, that have donated 200,000 hooks for the by-catch program in LAC. Two years of WWF work (2004-2005)

    37. 1,229 industrial fishing vessels in the EPO (10% EPO coastal countries) (larger than 24 m long, mean size is 45.5 m). Fishing trip duration 4-6 months. More than 3,800 LL fishing vessels, including artisanal smaller than 24 m. Plus thousands of outboard motor boats that fish with long-lines (16,000 only in Ecuador). Fishing trip duration 5 to 30 days. IATTC covers industrial fisheries both purse seine and long-line. Artisanal long-line fleet in LAC is an opportunity. OUR CHALLENGE

    38. Satellite tracking shows the precise travel route. The information is extremely valuable to design conservation measures. Each turtle tracked costs about US$ 10,000. Sponsors can give a name to their turtle and follow the turtle on the Internet.Satellite tracking shows the precise travel route. The information is extremely valuable to design conservation measures. Each turtle tracked costs about US$ 10,000. Sponsors can give a name to their turtle and follow the turtle on the Internet.

    41. Water temperature - how does it affect marine biodiversity? Bleaching: The heat and/or UV radiation causes algae that provides food for the coral to die (ejected) and turn white. That puts the coral in critical condition. The second big marine issue of the year 2003 was the decline of coral reefs in the Caribbean. (CLICK) The story-teller can be the hawksbill turtle. It feeds mostly on sponges and is therefore associated to coral reefs.The second big marine issue of the year 2003 was the decline of coral reefs in the Caribbean. (CLICK) The story-teller can be the hawksbill turtle. It feeds mostly on sponges and is therefore associated to coral reefs.

    42. Rising sea level - how does it affect marine biodiversity? Changes in coastline (erosion) Increases in water depth The second big marine issue of the year 2003 was the decline of coral reefs in the Caribbean. (CLICK) The story-teller can be the hawksbill turtle. It feeds mostly on sponges and is therefore associated to coral reefs.The second big marine issue of the year 2003 was the decline of coral reefs in the Caribbean. (CLICK) The story-teller can be the hawksbill turtle. It feeds mostly on sponges and is therefore associated to coral reefs.

    43. Altered sea currents - how do these affect marine biodiversity? Changes in salinity, water temperature, nutrient flow Altered dispersion of propagules (eggs, larvae) Altered migratory paths The second big marine issue of the year 2003 was the decline of coral reefs in the Caribbean. (CLICK) The story-teller can be the hawksbill turtle. It feeds mostly on sponges and is therefore associated to coral reefs.The second big marine issue of the year 2003 was the decline of coral reefs in the Caribbean. (CLICK) The story-teller can be the hawksbill turtle. It feeds mostly on sponges and is therefore associated to coral reefs.

    44. A WWF Case Study: The Impact of Climate Change to Hawksbill Turtles Climate Change Effects: 1) Increased sand temperatures, which can lead to changes in sex ratios or potentially result in mortality; 2) Increased ocean temperatures, which can lead to coral bleaching and other damage to turtle feeding habitats; 3) Loss of nesting and feeding habitats due to sea-level rise; 4) Changes in ocean currents, which can modify migrations paths and feeding patterns; 5) Extreme rainfall events cause water tables to rise and can flood nests from underneath; 6) Extreme rainfall events can degrade feeding habitats, such as coral reefs and sea pastures, through increased sedimentation. The second big marine issue of the year 2003 was the decline of coral reefs in the Caribbean. (CLICK) The story-teller can be the hawksbill turtle. It feeds mostly on sponges and is therefore associated to coral reefs.The second big marine issue of the year 2003 was the decline of coral reefs in the Caribbean. (CLICK) The story-teller can be the hawksbill turtle. It feeds mostly on sponges and is therefore associated to coral reefs.

    45. WASHINGTON --A one-two punch of bleaching from record hot water followed by disease has killed ancient and delicate coral in the biggest loss of reefs that scientists have seen in Caribbean waters. Associated Press - 31st March 2006 CORAL BLEACHING DURING FALL 2005 Early conservative estimates from Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands: about one-third of the coral has died recently. A NOAA report issued in February calculated that 96 percent of lettuce coral, 93 percent of the star coral, and almost 61 percent of the brain coral in St. Croix had bleached. New NOAA sea-surface temperature figures have found that the sustained heating in the Caribbean last summer and fall was by far the worst in 21 years of satellite monitoring. In the past, only some species bleached during hot water spells, and the problem occurred only at certain depths. But in 2005, bleaching struck far more of the region, at all depths and in most species. The second big marine issue of the year 2003 was the decline of coral reefs in the Caribbean. (CLICK) The story-teller can be the hawksbill turtle. It feeds mostly on sponges and is therefore associated to coral reefs.The second big marine issue of the year 2003 was the decline of coral reefs in the Caribbean. (CLICK) The story-teller can be the hawksbill turtle. It feeds mostly on sponges and is therefore associated to coral reefs.

    47. The resistance and resilience of marine biodiversity - a look at the past to understand the future Palaeoclimatology - short term fluctuations: The Earth's climate has fluctuated many times between warmer interglacials and colder Ice Ages during the last 2 million years, driven by changes in the Earth's orbit around the Sun. The second big marine issue of the year 2003 was the decline of coral reefs in the Caribbean. (CLICK) The story-teller can be the hawksbill turtle. It feeds mostly on sponges and is therefore associated to coral reefs.The second big marine issue of the year 2003 was the decline of coral reefs in the Caribbean. (CLICK) The story-teller can be the hawksbill turtle. It feeds mostly on sponges and is therefore associated to coral reefs.

    48. Climate change & marine species - added value to a conservation agenda The second big marine issue of the year 2003 was the decline of coral reefs in the Caribbean. (CLICK) The story-teller can be the hawksbill turtle. It feeds mostly on sponges and is therefore associated to coral reefs.The second big marine issue of the year 2003 was the decline of coral reefs in the Caribbean. (CLICK) The story-teller can be the hawksbill turtle. It feeds mostly on sponges and is therefore associated to coral reefs.