slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
youtube/watch?v=KpjEQQyBbcg PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
youtube/watch?v=KpjEQQyBbcg

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 73

youtube/watch?v=KpjEQQyBbcg - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 111 Views
  • Uploaded on

Of Galveston County *. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f0qenDaOjyw. LINKS. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KpjEQQyBbcg. *a separately held non-profit corporation from SBC WMU. 1. CWJC TRAINING. July 2010. Paperwork. During these sessions,

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'youtube/watch?v=KpjEQQyBbcg' - jamuna


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Of Galveston County*

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f0qenDaOjyw

LINKS

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KpjEQQyBbcg

*a separately held non-profit corporation from SBC WMU.

1

cwjc training

CWJC TRAINING

July 2010

paperwork
Paperwork
  • During these sessions,
    • Complete the application and give to the site coordinator
  • Mentor covenants will be signed at Orientation where you will meet your mentee
national honoree
National Honoree

Spring 2010

slide5

FREE! ALL FREE

The Mission of CWJC of Galveston Countyis to help women seek new direction for their lives through training, mentoring, Bible Study, and enthusiastic support.

slide6

Bible Study (Heart)

“I gave my life to Jesus one day in class. These people showed me what love really is and Who God really is. I joined the church last week, and I am going to be baptized soon.”

“I went from being a drug addict to being a CHRISTIAN—wow.”

–CWJC participant–

slide7

Mentor Relationships (Soul)

In CWJC and CMJC each participant is paired with a mentor to accompany the journey to wholeness. These relationships are often reciprocal in nature, as mentors receive a blessing from the experience as well.

Mentor videofrom Saddleback Church

what we believe
What We Believe
  • We believe in the Trinity, God as Father, Son and Holy Spirit, and the Bible as the Word of God. Salvation comes through grace by believing in Jesus Christ as the only begotten Son of God, our Savior and Lord. Once saved, the Holy Spirit indwells, hereby instructing, guiding, and empowering the individual to follow the mandate of Jesus Christ in daily living.
  • Titus 2:3 - Christian Women’s Job Corps is a response to this mandate.

8

overall aim
Overall Aim
  • To increase our students’ readiness for employment and level of self-sufficiency by means of life skill instruction, personal mentoring, Bible study, and prayer support in a Christian context.

9

goals

self sufficiency

hope

Goals

self respect

  • Encourage students in their daily walk

with God and in relying on Him for their

support and guidance as they gain

employment and self-sufficiency.

  • Assist students in developing short-term and long-term employ-ment goals and in identifying / accessing resources to achieve those goals.
  • Assess student’s personal and skill training needs in light of their personal and employment goals
  • Provide support and guidance by means of personal mentoring, classroom instruction, and Bible study / prayer to help students: -- build confidence -- develop a personal relationship with God --manage or overcome any present life barriers
  • Assist students in filling academic and skill training needs, gaps, and interests

10

the process of learning is more important then achievement
THE PROCESS OF LEARNING IS MORE IMPORTANT THEN ACHIEVEMENT!
  • All our students have strengths that need to be developed.
  • Bus analogy
  • With the student driving
  • Will mistakes be made?
  • Yes.
agenda for today
Agenda for Today
  • Video
  • Local Ministry Partners
  • General Volunteer information – why do we think the way we think
  • Local poverty metrics data
  • What Poverty looks and feels like in America
  • Breakout Sessions:
    • Teachers
    • Mentors

12

local ministry partners
Local Ministry Partners
  • Crisis Pregnancy Center – Christy Ann Dickson
  • Texas City Day Care – Elizabeth Collins, Althea Johnson
  • Jesse Tree – Ted Hanley, Sandra Gary
  • Women’s Crisis Center – Bonnie Martin
  • His Ministries – Vicki Westover
  • CWJC – Julie Minter
  • Samaritan Woman – Veronica Branch
  • Bay Area Turning Point – Neifa Andell
  • RSVP Volunteers of UTMB

13

statistics on women getting food stamps
Statistics on Women getting food stamps

Est @ $500/ea

  • La Marque 2210 $1.105M 30+%
  • Hitchcock 416 $.208M
  • Texas City 769 $.384M
  • Galveston 1906 $.953M
  • Total 5301 $2.650M

16

*As of 8/26/09 by HHSC/Strategic Decision Support, Texas Workforce Commission

statistics on children in poverty
Statistics on Children in Poverty*

Tot # of Children % in poverty

La Marque ISD 10,926 19%

Hitchcock ISD 1,684 19%

Texas City ISD 6,302 15%

Galveston ISD 10,926 24%

Dickinson ISD 7,554 19%

Total 207,206 18%

Overall Galveston County Poverty (CCISD) 15%

17

*2008 Census of the US Census Bureau

matt 26 11 the poor you will always have with you
Matt 26:11, “The poor you will always have with you……”
  • 1 Cor 13:2-3, “If I give all I possess to the poor and surrender my body to the flames, but have not love, I gain nothing.”
  • 1 Cor 13:6-7, “It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.”
  • James 2:8-10, “If you really keep the royal law found in Scripture, "Love your neighbor as yourself," you are doing right. But if you show favoritism, you sin and are convicted by the law as lawbreakers. For whoever keeps the whole law and yet stumbles at just one point is guilty of breaking all of it.”

19

slide20
Prov 21:13 “If a man shuts his ears to the cry of the poor, he too will cry out and not be answered.”

Available from aha! Process, Inc.www.ahaprocess.comHighlands, Tx

20

about ruby k payne
About Ruby K. Payne
  • http://www.ahaprocess.com/About_Us/Ruby_Payne.html
a generation ago the livelihood of gloria nunez s family was built on cars
Her father worked at General Motors for 45 years before retiring. Her mother taught driver's education. Nunez and her six siblings grew up middle class.

Nunez, 40, has never worked and has no high school degree. She says a car accident 17 years ago left her depressed and disabled, incapable of getting a job. Instead, she and her daughter, Angelica Hernandez, survive on a $637 Social Security check and $102 in food stamps.

A generation ago, the livelihood of Gloria Nunez's family was built on cars.

People tell Nunez her daughter could get more money in public assistance if she had a child.

23

not one ethnic group
Not one ethnic group
  • On a recent visit to a poor white community I was reminded that the evangelical church and the US government doesn't give a rip about poor whites. I was in a town, Scottville, Mich., of mostly poor whites and felt heavy by what I saw. Most of the families there are on welfare. For example, about 90% of the kids get free or reduced lunch at school. Teen suicide is a regular occurrence.

24

http://bradley.chattablogs.com/archives/019627.html

reality of poverty
REALITY OF POVERTY
  • Low wage jobs; come and go
  • Circle of life is intense and stressful
  • Cars and public transportation unreliable and insufficient
  • Housing is crowded, costly
  • Time and energy go into caring for the sick
  • Lack of health care
  • Interactions with the public is demeaning and frustrating
mental model of poverty
MENTAL MODEL OF POVERTY
  • Needy, deficient, diseased, not to be trusted, lazy
  • Hear this from policy makers, commentators, taxpayers
  • Fed by media reports that favor soap operas to conceptual stories and individual stories to trends and the broader influences (welfare queen but not comprehensive studies)
mental model of poverty1
MENTAL MODEL OF POVERTY
  • Needy, deficient, diseased, not to be trusted, lazy
  • Hear this from policy makers, commentators, taxpayers
  • Fed by media reports that favor soap operas to conceptual stories and individual stories to trends and the broader influences (welfare queen but not comprehensive studies)
hidden rules
Hidden Rules
  • Are the unspoken cues and habits of a group. Distinct cueing systems exist between and among groups and economic classes. Generally, in America, that notion is recognized for racial and ethnic groups, but not particularly for economic groups. There are many hidden rules to examine.
  • Quiz

28

poverty quiz
Poverty Quiz
  • I know which churches and sections of town have the best rummage sales.
  • I know which rummage sales have "bag sales" and when.
  • I know which grocery stores' garbage bins can be accessed for thrown-away food.
  • I know how to get someone out of jail.
  • I know how to physically fight and defend myself physically.
  • I know how to get a gun, even if I have a police record.
  • I know how to keep my clothes from being stolen at the Laundromat.
  • I know what problems to look for in a used car.

29

slide30
I know how to live without a checking account.
  • I know how to live without electricity and a phone.
  • I know how to use a knife as scissors.
  • I can entertain a group of friends with my personality and my stories.
  • I know what to do when I don't have money to pay the bills.
  • I know how to move in half a day.
  • I know how to get and use food stamps or an electronic card for benefits.

30

slide31
I know where the free medical clinics are.
  • I am very good at trading and bartering.
  • I can get by without a car.

31

what does this information mean
What does this information mean?
  • Assumptions made about individuals’ intelligence and approaches to the school and/or work setting may relte more to their understanding of hidden rules.
  • Students need to be taught the hidden rules of middle class – not in denigration of their own but rather as another set of rules that can be used if they so choose.
what does this information mean cont d
What does this information mean? Cont’d
  • Many of the attitudes that students and parents bring with them are an integral part of their culture and belief systems. Middle-class solutions should not necessarily be imposed when other, more workable, solutions might be found.
  • An understanding of the culture and values of poverty will lessen the anger and frustration that educators may periodically feel when dealing with these students and/or parents.
what does this information mean cont d1
What does this information mean? Cont’d
  • Most of the students that I* have talked to in poverty do not believe they are poor, even when they are on welfare. Most of the wealthy adults I have talked to do not believe they are wealthy; they will usually cite someone who has more than they do.

*Dr. Ruby Payne

barriers for those in poverty
Barriers for those in poverty
  • Language barriers
  • Transportation barriers
  • Cultural barriers
quality of life indicators resources
Quality of life indicators - Resources
  • Financial
  • Emotional
  • Mental
  • Spiritual
  • Physical
  • Support systems
  • Relationships / role models
  • Knowledge of hidden rules
slide38

Language Registers

  • Primary discourse is the language an individual first acquired.
  • Secondary discourse is the language of the larger society that the individual must be able to use to function in the larger society.
slide39

Acquisition of language only occurs when there is a significant relationship.

    • Would you learn to use sign language if there were no significant relationship that called for that usage?
  • When we ask students to move from casual to formal register, we need to direct-teach it.
language registers
Language Registers
  • 1. Static Register - This style of communications RARELY or NEVER changes. It is “frozen” in time and content. e.g. the Pledge of Allegiance, the Lord’s Prayer, the Preamble to the US Constitution, the Alma Mater, a bibliographic reference, laws .
  • 2. Formal Register - This language is used in formal settings and is one-way in nature. This use of language usually follows a commonly accepted format. It is usually impersonal and formal. A common format for this register are speeches. e.g. sermons, rhetorical statements and questions, speeches, pronouncements made by judges, announcements.
  • 3. Consultative Register - This is a standard form of communications. Users engage in a mutually accepted structure of communications. It is formal and societal expectations accompany the users of this speech. It is professional discourse. e.g. when strangers meet, communications between a superior and a subordinate, doctor & patient, lawyer & client, lawyer & judge, teacher & student, counselor & client,
language registers1
Language Registers
  • 4. Casual Register - This is informal language used by peers and friends. Slang, vulgarities and colloquialisms are normal. This is “group” language. One must be a member to engage in this register. e.g. buddies, teammates, chats and emails, and blogs, and letters to friends.
  • 5. Intimate Register - This communications is private. It is reserved for close family members or intimate people. e.g. husband & wife, boyfriend & girlfriend, siblings, parent & children.
poverty behavioral observations
Poverty Behavioral Observations
  • They get mad and quit their job/work. If they don’t like the boss/teacher, they will quit. Emphasis is on the current feeling, not the long-term ramifications.
  • Will work hard if they like you
  • They do not use conflict-resolution skills, preferring to settle issues in verbal or physical assaults or with humor.
  • Use survival language, tending to operate out of casual register.

52

poverty behavioral observations1
Poverty Behavioral Observations
  • They get mad and quit their job/work. If they don’t like the boss/teacher, they will quit. Emphasis is on the current feeling, not the long-term ramifications.
  • Will work hard if they like you
  • They do not use conflict-resolution skills, preferring to settle issues in verbal or physical assaults or with humor.
  • Use survival language, tending to operate out of casual register.

53

observations cont d
Observations, cont’d
  • Are not emotionally reserved when angry, usually saying exactly what is on their mind.
  • Have an extreme freedom of speech, enjoy a sense of humor, use the personality to entertain, have a love of stories about people.
  • Are very independent. They won’t take kindly to the “parent” voice. If their full cooperation is sought, the boss/employer needs to use the “adult” voice.

55

observations cont d1
Observations, cont’d
  • Are not emotionally reserved when angry, usually saying exactly what is on their mind.
  • Have an extreme freedom of speech, enjoy a sense of humor, use the personality to entertain, have a love of stories about people.
  • Are very independent. They won’t take kindly to the “parent” voice. If their full cooperation is sought, the boss/employer needs to use the “adult” voice.

56

observations cont d2
Observations, cont’d
  • Periodically need time off or late arrival due to family emergencies.
  • Need emotional warmth from colleagues/boss/teacher(s) in order to feel comfortable
  • Require a level of integrity from management, actively distrusting organizations and the people who represent the organizations. They see organizations as basically dishonest.

57

observations cont d3
Observations, cont’d
  • Periodically need time off or late arrival due to family emergencies.
  • Need emotional warmth from colleagues/boss/teacher(s) in order to feel comfortable
  • Require a level of integrity from management, actively distrusting organizations and the people who represent the organizations. They see organizations as basically dishonest.

58

observations cont d4
Observations, cont’d
  • Exhibit a possessiveness about the people they really like.
  • Need a greater amount of “space” to allow for the uniqueness of their personalities.
  • Show favoritism for certain people and give them preferential treatment.

59

observations cont d5
Observations, cont’d
  • Men socialize with men and women with women. Men tend to have two social outlets: bars and work. Men tend to be loners in any other social setting and avoid those social settings
  • Women with children tend to stay at home and have only other female relatives as friends, unless they work outside the home..
  • When a man and a woman are together, it is usually about a private relationship.

60

observations cont d6
Observations, cont’d
  • A real man is ruggedly good-looking, is a lover, can physically fight, works hard, “takes no prisoners.”
  • A real woman takes care of her man by feeding him and downplaying his shortcomings.

61

poverty
Poverty
  • Traps people in the tyranny of the moment
  • Difficult to attend to abstract information or plan for the future
  • These are the very things needed to build resources and financial assets
  • Causes: a few from choices, just as many from community conditions and political / economic structures
their perceived needs
Their Perceived Needs
  • More money
  • Material possessions – more stuff
  • A husband
  • Children
  • Fun
  • Desire a quick fix for stressed, lonely, and hurting lives
needs of women
Needs of Women
  • Balance - tips on managing time
  • Stress Relief – opportunities to get away
  • Purpose – need one
    • Know, grow, walk with God
    • Share that walk with others
    • Uniquely gifted for service
    • Until bearing fruit, will not find meaning
    • Discover spiritual gifts and talents
    • Place to use these gifts and talents
  • Relationships - women need each other
ultimate real needs
Ultimate Real Needs
  • We know they need Jesus
  • Women need women
    • Acceptance
    • Affirmation
    • Accountability
  • Distinct needs
    • Salvation and spiritual growth
    • Acceptance and self-worth
    • Family unity
    • Friendships
    • Financial security
    • Crisis care
life planning
Life Planning
  • Lack of planning gets manyindividuals in poverty in trouble financially and behaviorally
  • To help we must offer tangible support in planning – budgets and daily life
  • Ability to link time and task is missing in poverty. Amt of time to complete, self-talk, procedures necessary to do the task a part of planning.

71

slide73

A Woman's Personal Guide to Knowing God and Mentoring Others

  • Written by Carole Mayhall

http://waterbrookmultnomah.com/catalog.php?isbn=9780307458872

Also half.com or alibris.com