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School-Wide Positive Behavior Support Team Training Day 3. Regina Oliver, SERC Brandi Simonsen, UConn May 23, 2006. Advanced Organizer. 9:00-10:15 Team Reports 10:15-10:30 Break 10:30-12:00 PBS Overview 12:00-12:45 Lunch 12:45-2:00 Non-Classroom Systems 2:00-3:30 Action Planning.

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School wide positive behavior support team training day 3 l.jpg

School-Wide Positive Behavior Support Team Training Day 3

Regina Oliver, SERC

Brandi Simonsen, UConn

May 23, 2006


Advanced organizer l.jpg
Advanced Organizer

  • 9:00-10:15 Team Reports

  • 10:15-10:30 Break

  • 10:30-12:00 PBS Overview

  • 12:00-12:45 Lunch

  • 12:45-2:00 Non-Classroom Systems

  • 2:00-3:30 Action Planning



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Traditional Approach to Managing Challenging Behaviors

Challenging

behavior

Perception of noncompliance

Maintain/increase

challenging behaviors

Look to

“Control “or

“Punish”

Design/apply

manipulative

interventions

to have power

over student

Student’s needs

remain

unaddressed

(Knoster and Lapos, 1993)


Effective behavior support l.jpg
Effective Behavior Support

Challenging

behavior

Perception of unmet needs

Personal

growth

improves

self control

Look to

understand

needs and

develop

hypothesis

Reductions in

challenging behaviors

by learning alternative

skills

Improved

Quality of

Life

Design/deliver

prevention/

intervention

strategies based on

hypothesis

Meet needs in a more

socially acceptable

manner

(Knoster and Lapos, 1993)


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SW-PBS Logic!

Successful individual student behavior support is linked to host environments or school climates that are effective, efficient, relevant, & durable

(Zins & Ponti, 1990)


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Supporting Social Competence &

Academic Achievement

4 PBS Elements

OUTCOMES

Not limited to any

particular group of

students…it’s

for all students

Not specific practice or

curriculum…it’s a

general approach

to preventing

problem behavior

Supporting

Decision

Making

Supporting

Staff Behavior

DATA

SYSTEMS

Not new…its based on

long history of

behavioral practices &

effective instructional

design & strategies

PRACTICES

Supporting

Student Behavior


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Tertiary Prevention:

Specialized

Individualized

Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior

CONTINUUM OF

SCHOOL-WIDE

INSTRUCTIONAL &

POSITIVE BEHAVIOR

SUPPORT

~5%

Secondary Prevention:

Specialized Group

Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior

~15%

Primary Prevention:

School-/Classroom-

Wide Systems for

All Students,

Staff, & Settings

~80% of Students


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School-wide Positive

Behavior Support

Systems

Classroom

Setting Systems

Nonclassroom

Setting Systems

Individual Student

Systems

School-wide

Systems


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SW PBS Critical Elements

  • PBS Leadership Team

  • Staff Buy-In

  • Expectations & Behaviors

  • Lesson Plans for Teaching Expectations/Rules

  • Continuum of Procedures to Encourage Appropriate Behavior

  • Establishing a Data-based Decision Making System

    • Data System (entry & analysis)

    • Definitions of Behavior

    • Discipline Referral Form

    • Discipline Referral Process

  • Continuum of Procedures to Discourage Problem Behavior

  • Implementation Plan

  • Evaluation & Monitoring


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Team Composition

  • Administrator

  • Grade/Department Representation

  • Specialized Support

    • Special Educator, Counselor, School Psychologist, Social Worker, etc.

  • Support Staff

    • Office, Supervisory, Custodial, Bus, Security, etc.

  • Parent

  • Community

    • Mental Health, Business

  • Student

Start with

Team that

“Works.”


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Creating Staff Buy-In

  • Staff and faculty are part of decision-making

  • Communication is essential in this process

  • Frequent communication opens dialogue for problem-solving across the school



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Guidelines for Identifying Expectations

  • Identify behaviors expected of all students and staff in all settings

  • Select 3 to 5 behaviors

  • State expectations in positive terms

  • Select expectations that are general enough to be applicable in multiple settings, but specific enough to be of assistance in generating rules for targeted settings


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When Identifying Expectations

  • Consider existing data summaries

    • Discipline

    • Academic

  • Identify common goals

    • Mission statement

    • Other school-based programs

  • Identify characteristics of an ideal student


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Rules for Unique Settings

  • Definition:

    Specific skills you want students to exhibit and the procedures you want students to follow in specific settings


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Identifying Rules

  • Identify those specific areas of the school where problem behaviors occur

  • For each specific area and school-wide expectation, select 3 to 5 rules


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Example of School Matrix

FL PBS Project: University of South Florida



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Once you have developed expectations, it is not enough to just post the words on the walls of the school…

YOU MUST TEACH THEM!


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Why Develop a System for Teaching Behavior? just post the words on the walls of the school…

  • We can no longer assume that students know the rules/expectations and appropriate ways to behave

  • We can no longer assume that all students will learn appropriate behaviors quickly and effectively without consistent modeling/practice

  • We MUST assume that students will require different curricula, instructional modalities, etc. to learn appropriate behavior

  • We MUST assume that we need to teach appropriate behaviors/expectations and rules as effectively as we teach academic skills


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Lesson Plans: Two Levels just post the words on the walls of the school…

  • Level 1: Concept Development (Expectations)

    • Broad expectations

    • Applicable to all settings

  • Level 2: Skills (Rules)

    • Observable behaviors

    • Rules for specific settings


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Guidelines for Teaching Expectations (concept level) just post the words on the walls of the school…

Teach As You Teach Core Academics:

  • Define in terms that students will understand

  • List critical attributes

  • Provide examples and non-examples

  • Enhance concept development

  • Check for understanding

  • Extend concept development

  • Acknowledge efforts

  • Re-teach and restructure teaching


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Guidelines for Teaching Rules (skill level) just post the words on the walls of the school…

  • Identify problem settings

  • Review school-wide expectations—critical attributes

  • Review the rationale and/or application cues for the expectation(s)

  • Describe the specific, observable skill(s) for a targeted location and provide examples and non-examples

  • Engage students in an activity that will allow them to practice the desired behavior

  • Reward appropriate behavior


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Booster Trainings just post the words on the walls of the school…

  • You will be teaching expectations and rules throughout the year, but there will be times when we all need a more intensive refresher.

    • When do you think some of those times may be?

    • What will that format look like?


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Acknowledge & Recognize just post the words on the walls of the school…


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Something to Think About… just post the words on the walls of the school…

  • Do we provide reinforcers/rewards that are meaningful to individual students?

  • Do we align reinforcement with what an individual wants to gain or avoid from his/her behavior and to the universal behaviors we want to teach?


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Why Develop a just post the words on the walls of the school…School-Wide Reward System?

  • Increases the likelihood that desired behaviors will be repeated

  • Focuses staff and student attention on desired behaviors

  • Fosters a positive school climate

  • Reduces the need for engaging in time consuming disciplinary measures


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Reward System Guidelines just post the words on the walls of the school…

  • Keep it simple

  • Provide staff with opportunities to recognize students in common areas who are not in their classes

  • Include information and encouraging messages on daily announcements

  • Rewards should target 85-95% of students


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Guidelines just post the words on the walls of the school…

  • Reward frequently in the beginning

    • Keep ratios of reinforcement high (4:1)

  • Reward based on school-wide expectations—contingent upon desired behavior

  • Refrain from threatening the loss of rewards as a strategy for motivating desired behaviors

  • Refrain from taking earned items or activities away from a student

  • Students should be eligible to earn rewards throughout the day contingent upon appropriate behavior


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Section C and 9 of Binder just post the words on the walls of the school…

Data System

Behavior Definitions

Establishing a Data-based Decision-making System

Discipline Process

Office Referral Form


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Critical Questions just post the words on the walls of the school…

  • How many referrals are there:

    • per day each month?

    • based on location?

    • based on the type of behavior?

    • by student?

    • by time of day?

  • What is the range of consequences provided based on the type of behavior exhibited?


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Activity: Defining Problem Behaviors just post the words on the walls of the school…

  • On your own, define:

    Disrespect

  • Come to consensus within your group


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Characteristics of an Effective Office Referral Form just post the words on the walls of the school…

  • A clear distinction between problem behaviors that are staff-managed (minor) versus office-managed (major)


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Discipline Referral Process just post the words on the walls of the school…

  • Evaluate current behavior response process and procedures

  • Is the process meaningful and effective

  • Identify whether teachers are following the current plan for completing office discipline referrals

  • Interview teachers on their perceptions regarding the school’s responsiveness to inappropriate behavior


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Observe problem just post the words on the walls of the school…

behavior

Sample Response Process

Re-Teach Appropriate Behavior

Is the

behavior

major?

Problem Solve

NO

YES

Send to office

Determine the

consequence

Problem solve &

determine consequence

File in teacher’s

box

Write contract &

contact parents

Follow up

with student

within a

week

Make copies for

parents signature

Adapted from the FL PBS Project: University of South Florida


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When Developing Consequences… just post the words on the walls of the school…

  • Clearly identify where various behaviors will be managed (classroom vs. office referral)

  • Develop an array of responses to problem behaviors

  • Include opportunities in the array of consequences for students to learn and/or practice more acceptable behaviors

Section A pg. 20-23


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When delivering consequences just post the words on the walls of the school…(e.g., Disrespectful Student)

  • Staff trained to immediately correct:

    • Name problem behavior

    • State school-wide expected behavior

    • Model expected behavior

    • Ask student to demonstrate behavior

    • Provide acknowledgement to student

  • Staff trained to administer consequence:

    • Follow procedures based on major/minor


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Team Managed just post the words on the walls of the school…

Staff

Acknowledgements

Effective

Practices

Implementation

Continuous

Monitoring

Administrator

Participation

Staff Training

& Support


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Using Your Action Plan just post the words on the walls of the school…

  • Organizes/records your SW PBS process

  • Keep a record of what has been completed

  • Keep a record of what needs to be addressed

  • Critical elements guides the process


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Activity: Brainstorming Session just post the words on the walls of the school…

  • In small groups, brainstorm creative ways to:

    • Teach Staff

    • Teach Students

    • Involve Families and the Community

  • Share activities with whole group


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Relevant & just post the words on the walls of the school…

Measurable

Indicators

Efficient

Input, Storage, &

Retrieval

Team-based

Decision Making &

Planning

Evaluation

Continuous

Monitoring

Effective

Visual Displays

Regular

Review


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Areas of Evaluation just post the words on the walls of the school…

  • PBS Team

    • Functioning/Effectiveness

  • PBS Elements

    • The SW Plan

    • Implementation

  • Outcomes

    • Discipline & Academic Data

    • Staff, Student, and Parent Perceptions


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8 just post the words on the walls of the school…

Active Supervision


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School-wide Positive just post the words on the walls of the school…

Behavior Support

Systems

Classroom

Setting Systems

Nonclassroom

Setting Systems

Individual Student

Systems

School-wide

Systems


Purpose l.jpg
Purpose just post the words on the walls of the school…

To review critical features & essential practices of active supervision


Examples l.jpg
Examples just post the words on the walls of the school…

An elementary school principal found that over 45% of their behavioral incident reports were coming from the playground.


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High school assistant principal reports that over 2/3 of behavior incident reports come from “four corners.”


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A middle school secretary reported that she was getting at least one neighborhood complaint daily about student behavior on & off school grounds.


Slide50 l.jpg

An high school nurse lamented that “too many students were asking to use her restroom” during class transitions.


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At least 2 times/month, police are called to settle arguments by parents & their children in parking lot



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Nonclassroom Settings transitions.

  • Particular times or places where supervision is emphasized

    • Cafeteria, hallways, playgrounds, bathrooms

    • Buses & bus loading zones, parking lots

    • Study halls, library, “free time”

    • Assemblies, sporting events, dances

  • Where instruction is not available as behavior management tool


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Social Competence & transitions.

Academic Achievement

Positive

Behavior

Support

OUTCOMES

Supporting

Decision

Making

DATA

Supporting

Staff Behavior

SYSTEMS

PRACTICES

Supporting

Student Behavior


Classroom v nonclassroom l.jpg

Classroom transitions.

Teacher directed

Instructionally focused

Small # of predictable students

Nonclassroom

Student focused

Social focus

Large # of unpredictable students

Classroom v. Nonclassroom


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MANAGEMENT FEATURES transitions.

  • Physical/environmental arrangements

  • Routines & expectations

  • Staff behavior

  • Student behavior


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Basics transitions.

“Supervision Self-Assessment”

YES or NO


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Did I have at least transitions.4 positive for each negative student contact?

  • Have more positive student contacts than negative

  • Use variety of contact forms



Did i move continuously throughout area l.jpg
Did I transitions.move continuously throughout area?

  • Obvious

  • Positive

  • Interactive

  • Unpredictable


Did i scan frequently l.jpg
Did I transitions.scan frequently ?

  • Head up

  • Make eye contact

  • Overt body position


Did i positively interact with most students l.jpg
Did I transitions.positively interact with most students?

  • Variety of interaction types

    • Social positives & SW acknowledgements

  • Variety of students

  • Quick

  • Noticeable

  • Publicly appropriate


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McCormick Elementary School, MD transitions.

Monitoring Dismissal


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“Good morning, class!” transitions.

Teachers report that when students are greeted by an adult in morning, it takes less time to complete morning routines & get first lesson started.


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Did I handle transitions.minor rule violations efficiently?

  • Quickly

  • Privately

  • Neutrally

  • Follow-up with positive

  • Follow-up


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Did I follow school-wide procedures for handling transitions.major rule violations?

  • Quick

  • By the book

  • Business like

  • Disengage

  • Precorrect for next occurrence


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Do I know my transitions.school-wide expectations?

  • Positively stated

  • Small in number

  • Easy

  • Comprehensive

  • Defined


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Did I positively acknowledge transitions.at least 5 different students for displays of SW expectations?

  • Individualized

  • Informative

  • Sincere


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“Readers’ Digest” Guide transitions.

  • 7-8 “yes” = Super Supervision

  • 5-6 “yes” = So-So Supervision

  • <5 “yes” = Improvement Needed


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Why does everyone need to be involved? transitions.

  • Staff outnumbered

  • Adult presence

    • Prompts desired behavior

    • Deters problem behavior

  • “Being a good citizen”

    • Contribute to school climate


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Talk, Walk, Squawk transitions.

An elementary school principal found that over 45% of their behavioral incident reports were coming from the playground.


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Neighborhood Watch transitions.

A middle school secretary reported that she was getting at least one neighborhood complaint daily about student behavior on & off school grounds.


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Adopt-a-Bathroom transitions.

An high school nurse lamented that “too many students were asking to use her restroom” during class transitions.


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Music, Mags, Munchies transitions.

Over 50% of referrals occurring on “buses” during daily transitions.


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Other examples transitions.

  • Recess then lunch

  • Numbers instead of alphabet

  • Movement between hallway & classroom

  • “Trash-Trays-n-Travel” & “Whisper While you Walk”

  • “Game Rule” cards

  • Participation in assembly


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SYSTEMS FEATURES transitions.

  • School-wide implementation

    • All staff

    • Direct teaching 1st day/week

    • Regular review, practice, & positive reinforcement

  • Team-based identification, implementation, & evaluation

  • Data-based decision making


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Example Supervisors’ Activities transitions.

  • For each item on Self-Assessment share one specific strategy you try to use.

  • Agree on one item that everyone will emphasize next week, & tell all staff.

  • Complete Self-Assessment for one setting next week, & turn into Tom on Friday.


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BASIC MANAGEMENT PRACTICES transitions.

  • Active supervision

    • Movement

    • Scanning

    • Interact

  • Precorrections

  • Positive reinforcement of expected behavior


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Action Planning transitions.

  • Room 321 Ashford

  • Room 103 EO Smith

  • Room 37 Windham Middle School

  • Room 36 Teacher’s Memorial

  • Room 35 ???


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