prepositions conjunctions and interjections part ii n.
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PREPOSITIONS, CONJUNCTIONS, AND INTERJECTIONS, PART II. Conjunctions connect words or groups of words, and there are four types:. COORDINATING CORRELATIVE SUBORDINATING (Certain adverbs function like conjunctions, so we consider them a 4 th type: ) 4. CONJUNCTIVE ADVERBS.

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conjunctions connect words or groups of words and there are four types
Conjunctions connect words or groups of words, and there are four types:
  • COORDINATING
  • CORRELATIVE
  • SUBORDINATING

(Certain adverbs function like conjunctions, so we consider them a 4th type: )

4. CONJUNCTIVE ADVERBS

coordinating conjunctions
COORDINATING CONJUNCTIONS
  • This type of conjunction is used to connect ideas of equal importance like words, phrases, or complete sentences.
  • A coordinating conjunction, however, is always one word:

and, but, for, nor, or, so, yet

correlative conjunctions
CORRELATIVE CONJUNCTIONS
  • Like coordinating conjunctions, these are used to join words of equal importance, but they are always used in pairs.

both . . . and either . . . or

neither . . . nor whether . . . or

not only . . . but also

ex. Both students like pizza and steak.

ex. Both Andy and Steve like Elder football.

examples of coordinating and correlative conj
EXAMPLES OF COORDINATING AND CORRELATIVE CONJ.
  • Did the Italians or the Chinese invent pasta?
  • Both oak and walnut are used to make furniture.
  • Not only did Rosa win, but she also broke her record.
  • We will visit Delhi or Mack sometime in June.
  • I will not compromise with you, nor will you compromise with me.
  • Allison neither studied nor slept that night.
  • The deadline is next week, so* you still have time.

(*Any time a coordinating conjunction is used to join both parts of a compound sentence, place a comma in front of the conjunction.)

subordinating conjunctions
SUBORDINATING CONJUNCTIONS
  • These are used to join a dependent clause to an independent clause. In this respect, they function in a way similar to that of relative pronouns.

After we eat, we’ll go to the movies.

Punctuation Note: When the dependent clause comes first, use a comma to separate it from the independent clause (as above).

conjunction or preposition
Conjunction or Preposition?
  • A word like “after” can act as a preposition or a conjunction. To tell the difference, look at the other words behind it.
  • If there’s a subject AND verb, then it’s probably acting as a subordinating conjunction.
  • If it only has its object, then it’s acting as a preposition.
  • The exception arises when the object of a preposition is a noun clause.
conjunction or preposition1
Conjunction or Preposition?
  • After supper, we decided to go to the store.
  • Before we eat, let’s set the table.
  • He stood before the judge and begged for mercy.
    • He wanted to sing after whoever sounded the worst.
conjunctive adverbs
CONJUNCTIVE ADVERBS
  • These are truly adverbs, but they may join sentences; therefore, we call them “conjunctive.”
conjunctive adverbs1
CONJUNCTIVE ADVERBS
  • There is usually an obvious clue that a conjunctive adverb is present: a semicolon in front of it and a comma behind it.

ex. The chemical leak polluted the town’s water supply; consequently, people felt bad.

ex. The evidence sounded convincing; still, the jury believed the defendant’s story.

ex. The students took shelter in the basement; otherwise, they would not have survived the tornado.

interjections
INTERJECTIONS
  • These are words or phrases used to express strong feeling or emotion.
  • They express feelings such as anger, joy, terror, pain, fear, disgust, or sadness.
  • Because interjections are not part of the main structure of a sentence, they are set off by an exclamation mark or a comma.
interjections1
INTERJECTIONS
  • Unbelievable! Look at that huge buffet.
  • Oh, I thought you were meeting me at the buffet.
  • We went to the buffet and, oh, it was fun.
  • Never! I could not think of going to the buffet without my appetite.
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