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Close Reading. Revision Pistorius. 1. In the second paragraph , what does the writer’s word choice suggest about Cassio ‘being caught in a drunken brawl’? . Word Choice. Word Choice. Identify and highlight effective word choice Quote the word(s) Discuss their connotations

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Close reading

Close Reading

Revision Pistorius


Close reading

  • 1. In the second paragraph, what does the writer’s word choice suggest about Cassio ‘being caught in a drunken brawl’?



Word choice1
Word Choice

  • Identify and highlight effective word choice

  • Quote the word(s)

  • Discuss their connotations

  • Explain how these connotations help convey the writer’s point.


Denotation
Denotation

  • A word’s meaning/ definition

  • Home: a place where you live


Connotations
Connotations

  • A word’s associations

  • Home: security, warmth, personal, emotional investment, family

  • Place of residence has the same denotation, but vey different connotations


Close reading

  • The character who speaks the lines is Cassio, Othello’s friend and lieutenant, after the relatively trifling matter of being caught in a drunken brawl, though Shakespeare might just as well have given them to Othello himself after he killed his wife. Were Oscar Pistorius to hear Shakespeare’s words today they would no doubt strike an anguished chord.


Close reading

  • The character who speaks the lines is Cassio, Othello’s friend and lieutenant, after the relatively trifling matter of being caught in a drunken brawl, though Shakespeare might just as well have given them to Othello himself after he killed his wife. Were Oscar Pistorius to hear Shakespeare’s words today they would no doubt strike an anguished chord.


Close reading




Imagery
Imagery in this paragraph?


Imagery1
Imagery in this paragraph?

  • Identify the image

  • Quote the image

  • Deconstruct the image (literal root and what it is being compared to)

  • Explain the effect of the comparison


Close reading


Close reading

  • The character who speaks the lines is largest star in our solar system- the giver of life and light. This suggests that he believes Juliet is the most important and powerful thing in his life, clearly conveying the extremely passionate feelings he has for her. Cassio, Othello’s friend and lieutenant, after the relatively trifling matter of being caught in a drunken brawl, though Shakespeare might just as well have given them to Othello himself after he killed his wife. Were Oscar Pistorius to hear Shakespeare’s words today they would no doubt strike an anguished chord.


Close reading

  • The character who speaks the lines is largest star in our solar system- the giver of life and light. This suggests that he believes Juliet is the most important and powerful thing in his life, clearly conveying the extremely passionate feelings he has for her. Cassio, Othello’s friend and lieutenant, after the relatively trifling matter of being caught in a drunken brawl, though Shakespeare might just as well have given them to Othello himself after he killed his wife. Were Oscar Pistorius to hear Shakespeare’s words today they would no doubt strike an anguished chord.


Close reading

  • ‘strike largest star in our solar system- the giver of life and light. This suggests that he believes Juliet is the most important and powerful thing in his life, clearly conveying the extremely passionate feelings he has for her. an anguished chord.’ The playing of a sad musical note that can be easily recognised is being compared to the similarity between Pisotrius’ situation and Cassio’s words. This is an effective comparison because just as Pistorius recognises his own sad situation in Cassio’s tale of destroyed reputation we find something sad we can relate to in ‘an anguished chord’.


Close reading


Close reading

  • 3. Show how the writer’s about the police investigation in the third paragraph.word choice conveys his feelings about the police investigation in the third paragraph.


Close reading

  • This is not to suggest that about the police investigation in the third paragraph.Pistorius shot his girlfriend, ReevaSteenkamp, in a jealous rage. All will presumably be revealed in court in due time. Although it does appear, unless the South African police have made an atrocious mess of their investigation, that Pistorius owned a gun and was alone in his house with his victim at the moment of the crime. The only question seems to be whether the killing was premeditated, as the state claims, or, in some way or another, involuntary.


Close reading

  • This is not to suggest that about the police investigation in the third paragraph.Pistorius shot his girlfriend, ReevaSteenkamp, in a jealous rage. All will presumably be revealed in court in due time. Although it does appear, unless the South African police have made an atrocious mess of their investigation, that Pistorius owned a gun and was alone in his house with his victim at the moment of the crime. The only question seems to be whether the killing was premeditated, as the state claims, or, in some way or another, involuntary.


Close reading



Close reading

  • 4. the meaning of ‘tragic hero’. Show how paragraphs four and five help you to understand the meaning of ‘tragic hero’.


Close reading


Close reading

  • Tragic hero means a person/ character who achieves great things in their life before being undone by a flaw and then suffering a tremendous decline.

  • Paragraph four refers to the achievements of both Othello and Pistorius ‘overcoming seemingly insurmountable objects’.

  • Paragraph five refers to his ‘spectacular fall for grace’. This helps me to understand a tragic hero as one who experiences both a tremendous rise and fall.


Close reading


Close reading


Use of language
Use of language conveys a sense of

  • Imagery

  • Word choice

  • Sentence Structure

  • Tone

  • Other relevant features of style


Close reading

  • Whatever conveys a sense of the case, while not forgetting the sorrow and pain of ReevaSteenkamp’s family, Pistorius is, like Othello, a tragic hero. Both triumphed after overcoming seemingly insuperable obstacles. Othello, as a Moor, as a black man who rose to become an admired general in the city state of Venice; Pistorius, in a tale that would have defied even Shakespeare’s powers of imagination and is unequalled in terms of sheer will-power in the history of sport, as an Olympic runner who had his legs amputated between his knees and his ankles at the age of 11 months.


Close reading

  • Whatever conveys a sense of the case, while not forgetting the sorrow and pain of ReevaSteenkamp’s family, Pistorius is, like Othello, a tragic hero. Both triumphed after overcoming seemingly insuperable obstacles. Othello, as a Moor, as a black man who rose to become an admired general in the city state of Venice; Pistorius, in a tale that would have defied even Shakespeare’s powers of imagination and is unequalled in terms of sheer will-power in the history of sport, as an Olympic runner who had his legs amputated between his knees and his ankles at the age of 11 months.


Close reading

  • Imagery- ‘overcoming conveys a sense of seemingly insuperable obstacles’

  • This compares a person hurdling or climbing over physical impediments to their progress, that appeared insurmountable, to Pistorius overcoming his disability to become an Olympic athlete. This conveys the incredible, almost unbelievable progress he made in his athletic career.


Close reading

  • Word choice conveys a sense of

  • “unequalled” has connotations of something unique, memorable and truly outstanding. This suggests that Pisotrius’ sporting achievements have never been matched; they are they pinnacle of all athletic triumphs.


Close reading


Close reading

  • Show how the writer’s highlights use of language in paragraph five highlights Pistorius’ ‘fall from grace’. (4) (A)


Close reading

  • Even if highlights Pistorius avoids the mandatory life sentence for premeditated murder, even if somehow he were to recover his freedom, his reputation is shot and he is condemned to eke out the rest of his days as a sad shadow of the heroic, world famous figure he had struggled so valiantly to become. But while he stamped his name on the global map by managing to compete against able-bodied athletes in last year’s London Olympic Games, it is within South Africa that he has been most prized and cherished for longest, and where the shock at his fall from grace is most sharply felt.


Close reading

  • Even if highlights Pistorius avoids the mandatory life sentence for premeditated murder, even if somehow he were to recover his freedom, his reputation is shot and he is condemned to eke out the rest of his days as a sad shadow of the heroic, world famous figure he had struggled so valiantly to become. But while he stamped his name on the global map by managing to compete against able-bodied athletes in last year’s London Olympic Games, it is within South Africa that he has been most prized and cherished for longest, and where the shock at his fall from grace is most sharply felt.


Word choice2
Word Choice highlights

  • ‘Condemned’ has connotations of guilt, punishment and suffering. This suggests that the rest of Pisotrius’ life will be like a prison sentence, whether he is in jail or not.


Imagery2
Imagery highlights

  • a sad shadow of the heroic, world famous figure

  • This compares the rough image cast by an object to what Pistorius’ life will become. This is an effective comparison because just like a shadow is a lesser imitation of the real thing, so his life will pale in comparison with the glory he experience before. It also suggests he will be removed form the glory and ‘limelight’ of fame.


Close reading


Close reading

  • 7. highlights Explain in what sense Pistorius’ story mirrored his country’s (paragraph six)3 (u)

  • Three points

  • Own words


Close reading

  • The very early stages of his life seemed bleak and with little hope, matching the misery of Apartheid within South Africa at that time

  • His life then followed a similar upward trajectory to his country: it overcame Apartheid and he overcame his amputation to play rugby.

  • Both then had great hope for what they could achieve in the future.


Close reading


Close reading

  • 8. How does the little hope, matching the misery of Apartheid within South Africa at that timefirst sentence of paragraph eightperform a linking function in the writer’s argument at this point? (2) U


How to answer
How to answer: little hope, matching the misery of Apartheid within South Africa at that time

  • Identify in the linking sentence two words or phrases: one pointing back and one pointing forward.

  • Link the backward pointing one with the relevant part of the previous paragraph.

  • Link the forward one with the relevant parts of the following paragraph.

  • You must have followed all four of these steps to be awarded two marks.


Close reading

  • Yet now little hope, matching the misery of Apartheid within South Africa at that timePistorius has become a symbol of South Africa’s dark side, revealing the shadows South Africans themselves fear but would rather keep hidden from the world.


Close reading

  • Yet now little hope, matching the misery of Apartheid within South Africa at that timePistorius has become a symbol of South Africa’s dark side, revealing the shadows South Africans themselves fear but would rather keep hidden from the world.


Close reading

  • little hope, matching the misery of Apartheid within South Africa at that timePistoriushas become a symbol’ refers back to the previous discussion of how his story was seen to represent his country’s.

  • ‘dark side’ introduces discussion of the problems within South Africa that he has now become associated with.


Close reading


Close reading

  • 9. Explain fully the little hope, matching the misery of Apartheid within South Africa at that timeirony of Zuma’s message.


Situational irony
Situational Irony little hope, matching the misery of Apartheid within South Africa at that time

  • A discordance between two events.

  • In an effort to restrict viewership of a morally offensive movie, the city council bans exhibition of the movie in theatres. By banning the movie, the city council creates such a heightened awareness of the movie, that more people download and view pirated copies of the movie over the internet - specifically because it was banned - than would have viewed it in the theatres to begin with.


Close reading


Close reading

  • Zuma Regan was hit in the chest by a bullet fired by John was wishing to promote a positive national message. However, when he was giving the speech the country’s top sportsperson was being charged with murder.


Close reading


Close reading


Comment on the effect of
Comment on the effect of paragraph nine conveys his argument. (4) A

  • Length- particularly long or short? If so, why?

  • Use of punctuation for effect. Explain what the effect is.

  • Repetition.

  • Word order / inversion.

  • Use of climax or anticlimax.

  • Similar structure of one or more sentences in a paragraph.


Answering
Answering paragraph nine conveys his argument. (4) A

  • Quote part of the sentence

  • Identify important features of sentence structure.

  • Explain how they help to convey the writer’s point

  • (If you are unsure about sentence structure, use ‘The Cat Sat- A Short Guide to help you.)


Close reading

  • Pistorius paragraph nine conveys his argument. (4) A is not South Africa; he is not Mandela. His compatriots will overcome the blow to his reputation, and by extension theirs, in a way that he himself never shall. Ultimately, his is a universal tale, an epic rise and tragic fall. The spectacle this morning of him shielding his face – his new face, the one the world never knew or suspected he might have – on the way to court, and then reports of him weeping uncontrollably before the magistrate as the enormity of the horror of his predicament and of the crime of which he was being accused sank in, could not but inspire pity, sorrow and regret among all those familiar with his story around the world; as well, perhaps, as feelings of hatred and rage among his dead girlfriend’s relatives and friends. No one will have been left cold by Pistorius’ brutal morality tale.


Close reading

  • Pistorius paragraph nine conveys his argument. (4) A is not South Africa; he is not Mandela. His compatriots will overcome the blow to his reputation, and by extension theirs, in a way that he himself never shall. Ultimately, his is a universal tale, an epic rise and tragic fall. The spectacle this morning of him shielding his face – his new face, the one the world never knew or suspected he might have – on the way to court, and then reports of him weeping uncontrollably before the magistrate as the enormity of the horror of his predicament and of the crime of which he was being accused sank in, could not but inspire pity, sorrow and regret among all those familiar with his story around the world; as well, perhaps, as feelings of hatred and rage among his dead girlfriend’s relatives and friends. No one will have been left cold by Pistorius’ brutal morality tale.


Close reading

  • paragraph nine conveys his argument. (4) APistoriusis not South Africa; he is not Mandela.”

  • The semi-colon creates a balanced sentence, both of its clauses state that Pistorius-despite his symbolic importance- is not the most important man in South Africa and his and his country’s destiny are not the same. This helps to reinforce this key point.


Close reading

  • “The paragraph nine conveys his argument. (4) Aspectacle this morning . . . relatives and friends.”

  • An extremely long sentence helps to convey the immensity of what has happened to Pistorius. A list of sympathetic emotions has a cumulative effect, making it seem like it would be almost impossible not to feel sorry for Pisotrius. This, however, is balanced by the semi-colon that links the anger felt by his wife’s family. This underlines that strong emotions of some sort would be felt when considering the case.


Close reading


Close reading

  • 11. How the final paragraph to be? You should refer to both ideas and style in your answer(4) A/E effective a conclusion to the passage do you find the final paragraph to be? You should refer to both ideas and style in your answer(4) A/E


Effective conclusion
Effective Conclusion the final paragraph to be? You should refer to both ideas and style in your answer(4) A/E

  • Returns to /sums up key idea

  • Brings passage to a suitable climax/ anti-climax

  • Returns to the introduction

  • Returns to earlier image

  • Answers a key question

  • Uses a particularly powerful image /phrase.


Close reading

  • One of the lessons Shakespeare draws in his Venetian tragedy is contained in the words of the play’s anti-hero. “Reputation,” Iago replies to the forlorn Cassio, “is an idle and most false imposition.” In Pistorius’ case that would seem to ring true. His past glories are dead to the world, and what remains is bestial.


Close reading

  • One of the lessons Shakespeare draws in his Venetian tragedy is contained in the words of the play’s anti-hero. “Reputation,” Iago replies to the forlorn Cassio, “is an idle and most false imposition.” In Pistorius’ case that would seem to ring true. His past glories are dead to the world, and what remains is bestial.


Close reading

  • One of the lessons is contained in the words of the play’s anti-hero. “Reputation,” Shakespeare draws in his Venetian tragedy is contained in the words of the play’s anti-hero. “Reputation,” Iago replies to the forlorn Cassio, “is an idle and most false imposition.” In Pistorius’ case that would seem to ring true. His past glories are dead to the world, and what remains is bestial.


Close reading

  • Ideas- Effective because is contained in the words of the play’s anti-hero. “Reputation,” itpowerfully returns to the passage’s key idea: whatever happens now to Pistorius, his reputation and career are destroyed. “His past glories are dead to the world”. He will now be known for his wife’s death and his fall form grace rather than his glories.


Close reading

  • Style- Returns to the motif of Othello and the comparison between his tragedy and Pistorius’ own rise and fall. He also repeats the quotation from Othello that started the essay. Having considered Pisotrius’ story this had added significance and we truly understand the similarity.