transition 101 oti foundations n.
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Transition 101 & OTI Foundations

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 44

Transition 101 & OTI Foundations - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 111 Views
  • Uploaded on

2014 9 th Annual OTI. Transition 101 & OTI Foundations. Dr. Claudia Otto Disability Services Specialist Oklahoma Department of Career &Technology Education Michael Shuttic Director of Partners In Learning/Coordinator of Disability Services St. Gregory’s University. Agenda. Why?

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Transition 101 & OTI Foundations' - jaime-houston


Download Now An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
transition 101 oti foundations

2014 9th Annual OTI

Transition 101 & OTI Foundations

Dr. Claudia Otto

Disability Services Specialist

Oklahoma Department of Career &Technology Education

Michael Shuttic

Director of Partners In Learning/Coordinator of Disability Services

St. Gregory’s University

agenda
Agenda
  • Why?
  • Transition big ideas matched to OK IEP
  • Transition education steps
slide3

A Few of the Sponsors Department of Rehabilitation Services, OK Department of Career and Technology Education, Oklahoma Rehabilitation Council, ABLE Tech, OUZarrow Center for Learning Enrichment Center

ok transition council
OK Transition Council
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services, (Chair)
  • Dale Rogers Training Center
  • Lawton Public Schools
  • Oklahoma Family Network
  • DHS Developmental Disabilities Services
  • NAMIOklahoma
  • Oklahoma Autism Network
  • Tech-Now, Inc.
  • Chickasaw Nation Vocational Rehabilitation
  • Oklahoma Rehabilitation Council
  • Owasso Public Schools
  • Broken Arrow Public Schools
  • Cheryl Huffman, Consultant
  • OSU Sponsored Programs, ABLE Tech
  • Oklahoma Parents Center
  • Moore Public Schools
  • OUZarrow Center for Learning Enrichment
  • Oklahoma Department of Human Services
  • Metro Technology Centers
  • State Department of Career and Technology Education
  • Office of Juvenile Affairs
  • Oklahoma Developmental Disabilities Council
  • Partners In Learning, St. Gregory’s University
  • Oklahoma Child Study Center, Sooner Success
  • Norman Public Schools
  • University of Oklahoma, College of Education
quiz time

Quiz Time

10 Questions to Test Your Knowledge – and to explain WHY Transition Education

question 1
Question 1
  • What percent of former students with IEPs receive government benefit payments?
  • 10% of former students with IEPs receive government benefit payments
question 2
Question 2
  • What percent of students with IEPs dropped out of high school?
  • 28% of high school students dropped out of high school
question 3
Question 3
  • Two years after leaving high school, what percent of students with IEPs worked?
  • 70% of former students had worked, but two years after leaving high school only 40% working compared to 63% of same age peers without high school IEPs.
question 4
Question 4
  • Which domain is the biggest area of concern for former high school students with IEPs?
    • Reading Math Social Skills Health Care
  • Social skills are the most problematic for all categories of youth
    • 6 in 10 have moderate social skill scores
question 5
Question 5
  • What percent attend
    • Career tech programs?
    • 2-year community or junior colleges?
    • 4-year colleges?
  • What percent attend
    • 5% Career tech programs
    • 20% two-year community or junior colleges
      • 10% two years later
    • 9% four-year colleges (6% two years later)
question 6
Question 6
  • What percent of student with IEPs in high school self-identify in postsecondary education?
  • A third (approximately 33%) of postsecondary students with IEPs in high school self-identify.
    • 52% believe they do not have a disability.
    • 7% believe they have a disability but didn’t tell.
    • 40% identified having a disability, but 12% did not receive services.
question 7
Question 7
  • Assume 100 students. How many will
    • Graduate?
    • Enroll in higher education?
    • Will graduate within five years of starting?
  • Assume 100 students. How many will
    • 72 on average will graduate.
    • 22 on average will enroll in higher education.
    • 4 will graduate within five years of starting.
question 8
Question 8
  • Two years after leaving high school, what percent of former students with IEPs live with parents?
  • 75% still live with parents.
    • Similar rate to same age peers without IEPs.
question 9
Question 9
  • Former students with IEPs rate of being arrested and on probations is less than, equal to, or greater than same age peers who did not have IEPs in high school?
  • Equal to
question 10
Question 10
  • What skills and experiences predict post high-school success?
predictors of post school success
Predictors of Post-school Success
  • Students having a paid job during high school years
  • Students being actively involved in the IEP and transition planning and implementation process
  • Students understanding their abilities and impact of disability
  • Students having high self-determination skills
bonus question
Bonus Question
  • What is the purpose of special education as defined by IDEA 2004?
the purpose of special education
The Purpose ofSpecial Education

“ . . . a free appropriate public education that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepare them for further education, employment, and independent living.”

transition big idea 1
Transition Big Idea #1
  • Students need to answer:
    • Where do I want to live after leaving high school?
    • Where do I want to work after leaving high school?
    • Where do I want to learn after leaving high school?
  • Answers become postsecondary goals on the IEP.
transition big idea 2
Transition Big Idea #2
  • Students need to answer:
    • What skills do I need to learn to live where I want?
    • What skills do I need to learn to work where I want?
    • What skills do I need to go to school where I want?
  • Answers to these questions become annual transition goals.
transition big idea 3
Transition Big Idea #3
  • Students need to answer:
    • What supports do I need to live, learn, and work where I want to after leaving high school?
  • Answers to these questions become coordinated services to accompany annual transition goals.
transition big idea 4
Transition Big Idea #4
  • Students need to answer this question:
    • What classed do I take in school to be prepared to work, learn, and live where I want after leaving school?
  • The answer to this question becomes the course of study.
slide24

Answer This Question

Who talked most about transition?

who talks during the iep meeting sp ed teacher 50 admin 8 family 8 support staff 20 and student 10
Who Talks during the IEP meeting: Sp Ed teacher 50%, Admin 8%,family 8%, Support Staff 20% and Student 10%
3 part transition assessment model
3-Part Transition Assessment Model
  • Career Interest Assessments and Exploration
    • Used to help students select employment post-school goals
  • Independent Living Assessments
    • Used to help students select independent living post-school and annual goals
  • Self-Determination Assessments
    • Used to help students identify annual transition goals
air self determination assessment
AIR Self-Determination Assessment
  • Parent Version
  • Teacher Version
  • Student Version
  • Available at
    • http://education.ou.edu/zarrow
  • Cost: free
slide28

Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

  • Written parent consent is required for other agencies to attend meetings.
  • Students on IEPs, who graduate or age out, may NOT reenroll in public school for transition services.
  • Students who withdraw and obtain a General Educational Development (GED) may reenroll to acquire a diploma.
slide29

LEAs are not required by federal law to evaluate a student for the purpose of going to college.

  • Get a copy of IEP, SOP, testing info to take with you to postsecondary ed
  • Laws are different—IDEA (K-12), ADA/504 (postsecondary ed)
  • Self-identification & initiation necessary by the student!
history
History
  • Adopted from New Mexico’s transition change efforts
    • Over past 17 years implemented Institute concept
  • Based on Dr. Paula Kohler’s Transition Taxonomy
institute format
Institute Format
  • Purpose is to gain transition education knowledge to develop local transition improvement plans.
  • Implement plan.
  • Repeat process.
  • Teams expand, divide, build, and divide again.
taxonomy for transition
Taxonomy for Transition
  • Student-focused Planning
  • Student Development
  • Family Involvement
  • Program Structure
  • Interagency Collaboration
team function
Team Function
  • Teams meet regularly to implement plan and to gain new knowledge.
  • Teams expand to add new educational and community members.
  • Team leader and others attend regional meetings to gain new knowledge and review progress on plan implementation.
team format
Team Format
  • 35 teams across the state
    • Look at team and team leader handout
  • Arranged at first by Career Tech regions
  • As teams grow, teams break off into smaller more local groups.
    • Moore and Norman teams
functioning of high performing teams
Functioning of High Performing Teams
  • Meet on a regular basis.
  • Develop collaborative undertakings to involve all team members.
  • Add informational content to meetings.
  • Implement and add to plan.
  • Bring expanded group to 10thOTI in fall 2015.
facilitate team growth
Facilitate Team Growth
  • Schedule team in-service opportunities.
    • Full- and half-day workshops
    • 60- to 90-minute presentations
  • Participate in regular phone calls and e-mails to discuss team progress
  • Attend state-wide transition educational workshops
slide39

Common Career Areas of Interest to Oklahoma Youth

  • Medical
  • Rodeo/Bull Riding
  • Military
  • Automotive/Small Engines
  • Child Care/Teaching
  • Computers
  • Writing
  • Welding/Carpentry
slide40

Indicator 14 Reasons

  • What else do we know?
    • Students had numerous reasons for not working after high school
      • Health and/or disability – 35%
      • Unable to find a job – 24%
      • Other – 12%
      • Lack of Transportation – 12%
      • Parents don’t want me to – 12%
      • Don’t know – 12%
      • Lack of necessary employment skills – 6%
      • Don’t want to – 6%
  • OSDE Post-School Survey (2008)
slide41

More Indicator 14 Reasons

  • What else do we know?
    • Students had numerous reasons for not enrolling in postsecondary education (e.g., not having enough money, not wanting to, started working, needed to help family, did not have time, and decided to take time off).
employment profile
Employment Profile
  • Competitive Employment 70.6%
  • Family Member’s Business 20.5%
  • Supported Employment 19.7%
  • Volunteer/Internship 11.3%
  • Sheltered Workshop 6.8%
  • Military 1.3%
slide44

Contact Information

  • Dr. Claudia Otto
  • 405-743-5596
  • claudia.otto@okcareertech.org
  • Michael Shuttic
  • 405-878-5103
  • mshuttic@stgregorys.edu