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Plagiarism

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  1. Plagiarism Mr. moccia

  2. What’s to be covered Consequences of Plagiarism (Day #1) Defining Plagiarism (Day #1) Avoiding Plagiarism (Day #1 or 2) Recognizing Plagiarism (Day #2) Editing Plagiarism (Day #2)

  3. My Approach Plagiarism is serious; I perceive it as a lack of respect, a lack of trustfulness, and a lack of character Zero-Tolerance Good “ear” for writing “voices” Turnitin.com

  4. Consequences of Plagiarism • First Offense: • 0% for the assignment; different than F • Parent phone call • Guidance counselor informed; on academic record • Second Offense: • 0% for whatever marking period you are in • Parent phone call • Guidance counselor informed; on academic record

  5. “I didn’t know…” • Not knowing what you were doing is plagiarism is no cause for exceptions or leniency (ticket analogy) • Academic Negligence • Lesson Plan: • Teach you to know it, • recognize it, • avoid it, and • correct it • Therefore, there are no excuses

  6. Defining It • Definition: • “to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own” • “to use (another's production) without crediting the source” • “to commit literary theft” • “to present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source.” • (All from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary)

  7. Different Levels: Direct Plagiarism • IMPORTANT: They are all treated as plagiarism, and receive the same consequences • Direct Plagiarism: Taking more than 4 words in a row from another source without citing • Example: • Original Source: “Our word zealot comes from a group of first-century Jews who tried to overthrow Roman rule over Biblical Palestine through the use of murder and assassination” “Terrorism in Historical Perspective,” DigitalHistory.edu). • Student Paper: “Zealots were originally Jews who tried to overthrow their rulers.”

  8. Level 2: Indirect Plagiarism • Switching the words from a source without correctly citing/paraphrasing • Example: • Original Source: “Our word zealot comes from a group of first-century Jews who tried to overthrow Roman rule over Biblical Palestine through the use of murder and assassination” “Terrorism in Historical Perspective,” DigitalHistory.edu). • Student Paper: “Zealot originates from a collection of early century Jewish people; they attempted to conquer the Romans by practice of killing.”

  9. Plagiarism of Ideas • Taking an idea from a source without proper citation and credit • Example: • Reading an article about the origination of religious zealots, called “Terrorism in Historical Perspective” • Writing your own essay which discussing the same concepts without attributing credit to “Terrorism in Historical Perspective”

  10. Why are all 3 levels treated as one? The second two levels could be seen as less deceitful, but… It may be more deceitful, by the fact that the secondary levels are not as easy to catch Hard to determine level of deceitfulness; therefore, there is one blanket rule for anything that comes under the heading of plagiarism

  11. Option #1: Work on Essay by Yourself Option #2: Brainstorm or Share Ideas with a Partner Option #3: Conference with Me

  12. Avoiding Plagiarism Don’t panic; there are ways to avoid plagiarism – even unintentional plagiarism Tactic #1: Be sure you understand this lesson Tactic #2: Know how to paraphrase correctly Tactic #3: Always give credit where credit it due Tactic #4: Run anything “shady” by me

  13. Paraphrasing • Definition: Saying someone’s ideas in your own words, while giving credit • Example: • Original Source: “Our word zealot comes from a group of first-century Jews who tried to overthrow Roman rule over Biblical Palestine through the use of murder and assassination” “Terrorism in Historical Perspective,” DigitalHistory.edu). • Student Paper: Zealot originates from a collection of early century Jewish people; they attempted to conquer the Romans by practice of killing (“Terrorism in Historical Perspective,” DigitalHistory.edu).

  14. Incorrect Plagiarism • This can happen when you signal that you have paraphrased when in fact you have directly cited • Example: • Original Source: “Our word zealot comes from a group of first-century Jews who tried to overthrow Roman rule over Biblical Palestine through the use of murder and assassination” “Terrorism in Historical Perspective,” DigitalHistory.edu) • Student Paper: Zealots were originally Jews who tried to overthrow their rules(“Terrorism in Historical Perspective,” DigitalHistory.edu).