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Portion Distortion Nutrition Awareness Presented by Deanna Carlson, RN, BS, Clinical Coordinator Women s Heart Cente PowerPoint Presentation
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Portion Distortion Nutrition Awareness Presented by Deanna Carlson, RN, BS, Clinical Coordinator Women s Heart Cente

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Portion Distortion Nutrition Awareness Presented by Deanna Carlson, RN, BS, Clinical Coordinator Women s Heart Cente

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    1. Portion Distortion Nutrition Awareness Presented by Deanna Carlson, RN, BS, Clinical Coordinator Womens Heart Center

    2. My Pyramid What Im Eating & Drinking now

    3. What can you do about it? Know your heart risks Know your numbers Know what lifestyle changes you need to make Know when you need medication

    4. The Numbers! Cholesterol/Lipids The FATS LDL Less than 100 HDL Greater than 40 male 50 female Triglycerides Less than 150 Blood pressure 120/80 Blood Glucose 100 or less

    5. Live Well Diet vs. Western Diet

    6. Live Well vs. Western Diet

    7. Obesity People who are about 20 pounds or more overweight are more likely to develop heart disease even if they have no other risk factors The CDC estimates that 1-3 children born in the last 6 years will develop diabetes in their lifetime directly related to obesity Risk is greater if the weight is around the stomach instead of around the hips (apple versus pear shape) Waist Measurement: Women: >35 inches considered high risk Men: >40 inches considered high risk Body Mass Index: 18.5-24.9 healthy 25.0-29.9 overweight 30.0 or greater Obesity

    8. Nutrition Awareness What does this mean? Too many calories Weight gain 100 excess calories x 7 days = 700 calories/week 700 calories a week x 52 weeks = 36,400 calories 36,400 calories / 3500 calories equals 10.4 pounds per year (3500 calories adds up to one pound)

    9. CALCULATING CALORIES 1. WRITE YOUR BODY WEIGHT IN THE EQUATION THAT FITS YOUR ACTIVITY LEVEL AND GENDER. THEN, MULTIPLY. A) Moderately active male: ____ pounds x 15 calories = _____ total calories per day B) Moderately active female: ____ pounds x 12 calories = _____total calories per day C) Relatively inactive male: ____ pounds x 13 calories = _____ total calories per day D) Relatively inactive female: ____ pounds x 10 calories = _____ total calories per day

    10. Nutrition Awareness Why is 60% of the American population overweight? Look at what we are eating! The Famous Six Dollar Burger is: 1010 calories, 26 grams of saturated fat, 72 grams of carbohydrates, 1960 mg of sodium An order of large fries is: 620 calories, 6 grams of saturated fat, 80 grams of carbohydrates, 380 mg sodium Medium (32 ounce) Coca-Cola: 373 calories, 104 grams of carbohydrates, 133 mg of sodium Total Calories: 2003 calories, 32 grams of saturated fat, 256 grams of carbohydrates, 2473 mg of sodium

    11. Fat Recommendations No more than 10% of total calories should come from saturated fat. Choosing lean foods such as fish, skinless white poultry, and low fat dairy products will help to reduce fat intake. To reduce saturated fat, limit meat, butter, cheese, whole milk, cream, eggs, foods made from chocolate, lard, solid shortenings, and palm and coconut oils. Omega-3 recommendation is between 500-1,000 mg per day.

    12. Grams of Saturated Fat per Day (There are 9 calories per gram of fat)

    13. Benefits of Fats Monounsaturated fats Lowers bad LDL cholesterol and raises good HDL cholesterol May reduce the risk of heart disease and diabetes Examples: Olive Oil, Canola Oil, Almonds, Peanuts, Peanut Butter, Olives, Avocados Omega 3 fats Lowers triglycerides May reduce inflammation May reduce the risk of sudden cardiac death Examples: Flax Seed, Fish and Shellfish, Walnuts, Soybeans, Canola Oil Polyunsaturated fats Lowers LDL and raises or maintains HDL Examples: Use tub margarines instead of stick margarines.

    14. The Bad & the Ugly Fats Saturated Fat All animal fats: ground beef, chicken skin, cheeses, ice cream, butter Palm and coconut oil: packaged foods Partially Hydrogenated or Trans Fats Fried fast foods and restaurant foods Packaged, prepared foods: cookies, cakes, crackers, chips, pastries, frozen and packaged meals

    15. Quick Tips to Cut Fat & Calories

    16. Benefits of Dairy Foods Lowers blood pressure May help insulin sensitivity Weight control: may be helpful May reduce risk of colon cancer Less risk of osteoporosis Examples: Fat-Free 1% milk, light yogurts, soy milk enriched with calcium

    17. How Much Fiber is Recommended? The average American eats about 10 to 15 grams of fiber a day Dietary guidelines recommend: Under the age of 50: Men: 38 grams Women: 25 grams Over the age of 50 Men: 30 grams Women: 21 grams

    18. What is Dietary Fiber? Fiber is the part of the plant-based foods that the body does not digest and absorb. Two types of fiber can be found in food: soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber May improve cholesterol and blood sugar levels. Slows the movement of foods in the small intestine contributing to feelings of fullness. Sources: oats, dried beans and some fruits, such as apples, oranges, strawberries and grapefruit, and vegetables Insoluble fiber Adds bulk to the stool and helps prevent constipation. Reduces risk of colon cancer and rectal cancers by acting as an intestinal scrub brush . Sources: vegetables, wheat bran, and whole grains.

    19. Benefits of Whole Grains & Starches Nutrients, Fiber and Phytochemicals Reduces Risk of: Diabetes Heart Disease Some Cancers Fiber - Helps control your weight, blood sugar and lowers cholesterol Reduces the risk of Stomach or Intestinal Problems Examples: Whole grain/high fiber cereals, whole wheat bread and pastas, brown rice, beans, lentils and split peas, yams, squash and potatoes with skin

    20. Benefits of Vegetables & Fruits Nutrients, Phytochemicals & Fiber again- Reduces the risk: - Lowers blood pressure - Less risk of heart disease, stroke, & cancer - Less risk of diabetes Weight control - Filling (high fiber & water content) - Naturally low in calories especially vegetables Examples: Dark red or purple grapes, blueberries, blackberries, orange, red grapefruit, kiwi fruit, spinach and dark leaf lettuce, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, asparagus, red peppers and carrots

    21. Benefits of Protein Maintains body functions such as enzymes, hormones and antibodies Protein is filling helps with weight control and may lower the risk of heart disease Examples: Fish and shellfish, legumes, soy protein foods, nuts and seeds, soy protein food, low-fat cheeses, skinless poultry and lean red meat

    22. Total Carbohydrates Carbohydrates are the bodys main energy source, the primary fuel for cells. Carbohydrates are starches and sugars Complex carbohydrates and sugars from fruit and milk are preferred to simple sugars from candy and sweets. The body absorbs complex carbohydrates more slowly than it absorbs simple sugars, providing the body with more energy for a longer period of time. Complex carbohydrates, fruit and milk also provide more nutrients and fiber than sweets do.

    23. Benefits of Maintaining Blood Sugar Blood sugar 100mg/dl or less 3-7 times more likely to develop heart disease and have a heart attack Diabetes carries the same weight as actually having a cardiac event One of the most important risk factors for stroke in men and women

    24. Food Guide Pyramid

    25. My Pyramid Goals

    26. Fast Food Comparisons

    27. Some Restaurant Favorites

    28. No bad foods, ONLY bad habits!

    29. Physical inactivity is associated with increased weight, higher cholesterol and diabetes, which all increase risk Regular moderate exercise can help lower cardiovascular risk, lower blood pressure, reduce cholesterol and control diabetes. Women who exercise regularly live longer and in better health Exercise can be broken up, but should start slowly and gradually build up. Women with other medical conditions should consult their doctor prior to beginning an exercise program Suggest 10,000 Steps Program as a way to increase physical activity Source: AHA Heart and Stroke Facts, 2002Physical inactivity is associated with increased weight, higher cholesterol and diabetes, which all increase risk Regular moderate exercise can help lower cardiovascular risk, lower blood pressure, reduce cholesterol and control diabetes. Women who exercise regularly live longer and in better health Exercise can be broken up, but should start slowly and gradually build up. Women with other medical conditions should consult their doctor prior to beginning an exercise program Suggest 10,000 Steps Program as a way to increase physical activity Source: AHA Heart and Stroke Facts, 2002

    30. ACTIVITIES AEROBIC ACTIVITIES: use the arm and leg muscles and give the heart and lungs a continuous workout. Examples: brisk walk, dancing, bicycling, swimming, skating ANAEROBIC ACTIVITIES: build and tone muscles but are not as beneficial to the heart and lungs as aerobic. Examples: baseball, tennis, weight lifting, sprinting EXERCISE Approximate CALORIES expended Walking 100 calories burned per mile Jogging 120 calories burned per mile Swimming/bicycling 100 calories burned in 20 minutes Aerobic exercise to music 100 calories burned in 20 minutes

    31. Life Style Changes What ever you choose to do, take it one step at a time. Exercise anything is better than nothing Diet nutritionally balanced Maintain a healthy weight If you smoke, QUIT Drink Alcohol in moderation Reduce your stress If you have diabetes manage it well