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Session 2

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  1. Session 2 • Perspective Writing and Social Justice Research

  2. Perspective Writing Can Mean Different Things • 1. Taking Sides and writing from a perspective that is not exactly what you believe in. • 2. Writing from the perspective of a person in history who has been oppressed • THE MAIN POINT is TRYING TO CREATE WRITING ASSIGNMENTS WHERE STUDENTS IDENTIFY WITH THE HISTORY

  3. What I hope you Get from Today: • 1. Ideas for creating assignments which use perspective • 2. Ideas for getting students engaged with textsand talk • 3. Ideas for research methods (more of this on the last presentation—but a little now)

  4. How? • 1. I will share 4 (if we have time) demo lessons • 2. Debriefing

  5. Demo Lessons • My Formula 1-2-3 Writing Levels 1-2-3

  6. Nat Turner Activity • Demo Lesson #1 • LINK TO CURRICULUM HANDOUT

  7. Welcome Justice Warriors! Monday September 21 • The next notebook assignment is 4: Title it “Slave Resistance” • Today we will be learning about how some slaves resisted their situations, some violently and nonviolently. • Homework this week is pages 176-179, notes and summary. Due Thursday.

  8. Quick Write (2 minutes):Imagine that you are a slave. If you had the chance to escape, would you? What would the consequences be?

  9. (Write Down ) Running Away • The most common type of resistance. • Harriet Tubman ran away and led more than 300 slaves to freedom on the Underground Railroad.

  10. Haiti 1804-an entire country of slaves revolts!!

  11. Rebellions • Rebellions were a constant fear among slave owners. Let’s read about two of them.

  12. Denmark Vesey, 1822 -1822 Planned Rebellion to burn down Charleston, SC -Gathered Weapons but rebellion was stopped before it was started -Vesey and 35 others were hanged

  13. Nat Turner’s Violent Rebellion, 1831

  14. Responses to Slave Uprisings • 1. Slaves forbidden to read or write • 2. Slaves forbidden to do ANYTHING religious, especially preaching. And. . . • 3. 1850 Fugitive Slave Act: made it easy for slave owners to recapture ex-slaves or pick up any black person and claim they had run away

  15. Assignment: Motivational Speech from Nat Turner and Denmark Vesey • Imagine you are Nat Turner and Denmark Vesey. Write a motivational speech to other slaves about joining your rebellion. Remember that these slaves aren’t convinced. CONVINCE THEM!!! Be sure to talk about the injustices of slavery, the role of whites, or anything else you can think of to get people on your side. • Requirements: At least ½ page speech. Appropriate language.

  16. Debrief • What strategies were used in this lesson? • Were the strategies in any way higher level thinking strategies? How? • What were some positives about this lesson? • What might be some negatives? • How could you use these strategies in your classroom?

  17. September 22: Nat Turner DBQ Label your assignment 5: Nat Turner DBQ Remember Homework this week is pages 176-179 notes and summary, due Thursday. • Was Nat Turner a hero or a madman?

  18. Today we are going to read 3 documents • Each of these documents evaluate what kind of person Nat Turner was. • Silently read the documents and highlight or mark important points.

  19. Document A 1. Who wrote this document? When and where was it published? What kind of publication is it? 2. Is there a contradiction between Turner and Gray’s description? How and why? Document B 1. Who wrote this document? When and where was it published? What kind of publication is it? 2. According to the author of this article, what kind of person is Nat Turner? Think about when this article was written: How might its publication date affect how the author represents Turner? Refer to your timeline if necessary. Document C 1. Who wrote this document? When? How long after the Turner rebellion was this document written? 2. Who is the author of this document speaking to? How does his audience affect what he says and how he says it? 3. According to the author of this speech, what kind of person is Nat Turner? What proof does he provide to illustrate that Turner is this type of person?

  20. Was Nat Turner a Hero, or a Madman? • West Side • Your main job is to argue that Nat Turner was a Madman. • East Side: • Your main job is to argue that Nat Turner was a Hero. • Elect a spokesperson, a recorder, and a timekeeper for your group. You must use at least 3 pieces of evidence from the documents provided to prove your point. You must also have 2 more pieces of evidence based on what you have learned. I will keep score during the discussion for strong points made in favor of your side. The group that wins the debate get extra points.

  21. Debate/Discussion Rules • 1. One mic!! • 2. Be respectful. Make the discussion about the issue, not the person. • 3. Don’t question or argue with other people. Make your point. • 4. Extra Credit for the side with winning arguments.

  22. Checkoff: TOTD • 1. Who was Nat Turner? Was he a hero or a madman? • 2. What is your evidence? • 3. What other evidence would you like to have to inform your decision? • 4. Why do the characterizations in Documents A, B, and C differ? • 5. Which do you think is the most trustworthy? • 6. How does the passage of time affect how people view(ed) Turner? • 7. How do you think most people today would characterize Turner? As a hero, or villain?

  23. Debrief • What strategies were used in this lesson? • Were the strategies in any way higher level thinking strategies? How? • What were some positives about this lesson? • What might be some negatives? • How could you use these strategies in your classroom?

  24. Another Idea: Social Justice Sponges • LINK

  25. How You Could Incorporate Perspectives into Your Teaching (and maybe in terms of social justice): • Some Ideas • Create a journal entry where you are _______ (a person of your choosing). • Write a speech from the perspective of ___________. • Argue that (historical person) is a hero or a villain. • Headstones • Imagine you are ___________. Create a diary entry in which you detail your experience. • After reading a passage, have students write a creative piece from the perspective of the person it is about.

  26. Sample from Great Depression Test 2016 • LINK

  27. Sample from Modern World History (World War 1) • LINK • SAMPLE

  28. Demo Lesson #3

  29. Japanese Internment Activity

  30. Japanese-American Internment Please take out a sheet of paper and pencil/pen Don’t forget: Homework this week is: Zinn, pages 417-420, due Thursday, February 25. THERE ARE 13 Paragraphs.

  31. What do you know about Japanese American internment?

  32. JAPANESE-AMERICAN INTERNMENT • Japanese relocation (Executive Order #9066) • Over 120,000 Japanese Americans were relocated during the war to internment camps • Supreme Court upheld its’ constitutionality (Korematsu v. United States)

  33. Internment Camp in Fresno (Butler and Maple)

  34. Today, we will look at documents that address the question: Why were Japanese and Japanese Americans interned during the Second World War?

  35. Watch Government Newsreel • Why did the U.S. Government intern (imprison) Japanese citizens during World War 2? • CLIP

  36. Government Newsreel • What were some of the reasons for internment offered in the newsreel? • How does the newsreel portray internment? Is it positive or negative? • Who do you think the audience was for this newsreel?

  37. Using Documents B, C, D, and E • True or False. The United States Government interned Japanese Americans MAINLY because they were concerned about national security during World War 2. • Write a paragraph that explains your position. (5 sentences). • You must use 2 direct quotes from the documents.

  38. You will have 15 minutes to finish your paragraph and place it around the room.

  39. Mark the answers you agree with. • Use a post it note to write why you agree or disagree with the paragraph. • Discussion

  40. Debrief • What strategies were used in this lesson? • Were the strategies in any way higher level thinking strategies? How? • What were some positives about this lesson? • What might be some negatives? • How could you use these strategies in your classroom?

  41. Demo Lesson #4: Tea Party

  42. Read your role. Answer the questions on another sheet of paper. • “How do you feel about the war with Japan?” • “What is your opinion about how Japanese Americans were treated by the U.S. government? Why do you feel that way?”

  43. Tea Party Activity • Introduce yourself to at least 5 other people. • “Explain what you think about the war with Japan.” • “Explain your opinion about how Japanese Americans were treated by the U.S. government? Why do you feel that way?”

  44. Find someone who feels the same way you do about the Japanese American experience during World War II. Who is this person? What do you agree about? Why do you think this person feels similarly to you? • Find someone who feels differently than you do. Who is this person? How is this person’s opinion different than yours? Why do you think you feel differently?

  45. Wrap-Up • What have you learned about Japanese Internment from these activities? (video, and tea party?) Write 1 5 sentence paragraph about what you’ve learned. • You must use the following words somewhere in your response : internment, Japanese-Americans, Injustice

  46. Congress agreed in 1988 to pay each family of internment $20,000 in reparations. • Optional Writing Prompt: Do you agree with this policy? Why?

  47. Debrief • What strategies were used in this lesson? • Were the strategies in any way higher level thinking strategies? How? • What were some positives about this lesson? • What might be some negatives? • How could you use these strategies in your classroom?