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Hazard Communication. HAZCOM Standard OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1200. Developed by T. Michael Self, CPEA (Health & Safety) Southeast District. Course Goal.

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hazard communication

Hazard Communication

HAZCOM Standard

OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1200

Developed by

T. Michael Self, CPEA (Health & Safety)

Southeast District

course goal
Course Goal

The basic goal of a Hazard Communication Program is to be sure employers and employees know about work hazards and how to protect themselves; this should help to reduce the incidence of chemical source illness and injuries.

hazcom
HAZCOM . . .

OSHA has estimated that more than 32 million workers are exposed to 650,000 hazardous chemical products in more than 3 million American workplaces.*

Does this pose a serious problem for exposed workers and their employers …

What do you think?

* OSHA.gov

what does this standard do
What Does This Standard Do?

The HCS provides workers the right-to-know concerning the hazards and the identities of the chemicals they are, or may have the potential to be, exposed to in the workplace.*

* OSHA.gov

seven steps to safety success
Seven Steps To Safety Success

MSDS

  • Hazard Assessment
  • Develop a written HAZCOM Plan
  • Appointment of a HAZCOM Coordinator
  • Conduct the chemical inventory
  • Initiate labeling requirements
  • Maintain the MSDS library
  • Establish employee training

Training

Inventory

Labeling

HAZCOM

Coordinator

Plan

Assessment

general information
General Information
  • Effective May 23, 1988, OSHA regulations require that employees be made aware of hazardous substances in the workplace.
  • In general, each employee should be appraised of the hazardous properties of chemicals that they may encounter along with measures to take to protect themselves from these chemicals.
hazard determination
Hazard Determination
  • The standard requires that employers inventory all hazardous chemicals in the workplace and include that inventory as a part of the written hazard communication program.
  • This inventory will eventually serve as a master list for which a MSDS must be obtained and maintained.
what are some of the hazardous materials
Explosives

Gases

Flammable Liquids

Flammable Solids

Oxidizers

Organic Peroxides

Toxic Materials

Infectious Substances

Radioactive Materials

Corrosive Materials

What Are Some Of The Hazardous Materials?
hazard class 1 explosives
Hazard Class 1Explosives

Division 1.1 Explosives with a mass explosion hazard

Division 1.2 Explosives with a projection hazard

Division 1.3 Explosives with predominantly a fire hazard

Division 1.4 Explosives with no significant blast hazards

Division 1.5 Very insensitive explosives i.e. blasting agents

Division 1.6 Extremely insensitive detonating articles

hazard class 2 gases
Hazard Class 2Gases
  • Division 2.1 Flammable Gases
  • Division 2.2 Non-flammable, non-toxic compressed gasses
  • Division 2.3 Gases toxic (poisonous) by inhalation
  • Division 2.4 Corrosive gases (Canada)

Oxygen

Acetylene

Nitrogen

Chlorine

hazard class 3 flammable liquids
Hazard Class 3Flammable Liquids
  • Includes combustible liquids [U.S.]

Solvent Based Paints

Mastics & Adhesives

Pipe Joint Compounds

Sealant

Cleaning Solvents

Glues

Paint Strippers

hazard class 4 flammable solids
Hazard Class 4Flammable Solids
  • Spontaneously combustible materials
  • Dangerous when wet materials

Substances Liable to Spontaneous Combustion; Substanceswhich, in Contact with Water, Emit Flammable Gases

hazard class 5 oxidizing substances and organic peroxide
Hazard Class 5Oxidizing Substances and Organic Peroxide
  • Division 5.1 Oxidizers - A substance that yields oxygen readily to stimulate the combustion of certain other substances.
  • Division 5.2 Organic Peroxides - A derivative of hydrogen peroxide in which part of the hydrogen has been replaced by an organic peroxide
hazard class 6 toxic materials
Hazard Class 6Toxic Materials
  • Division 6.1 Toxic Materials
  • Division 6.2 Infectious Substances
hazard class 8 corrosive materials
Hazard Class 8Corrosive Materials
  • A liquid or solid that causes visible destruction or irreversible damage to skin tissue at the point of contact, pH that has a severe corrosion rate on steel
  • Similar to RCRA corrosive definition but does not include specific pH thresholds
develop a written hazcom plan
Develop a writtenHAZCOM Plan
  • What needs to be in this plan?

I. POLICY

II. PURPOSE

III. RESPONSIBILITY

IV. MATERIALS, INVENTORY, AUDITS

V. MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS (MSDS)

VI. LABELS AND LABELING

VII. INFORMATION AND TRAINING

VIII NON-ROUTINE WORK OR TASKS

IX. INFORMING CONTRACTORS

X. PROGRAM MAINTENANCE - OTHER FUNCTIONS

hazcom coordinator
HAZCOM Coordinator
  • Just what does this person do?
conduct the chemical inventory

Explosives

Gases

Flammable Liquids

Flammable Solids

Oxidizers

Organic Peroxides

Toxic Materials

Infectious Substances

Radioactive Materials

Corrosive Materials

Conduct The Chemical Inventory
initiate labeling requirements
Initiate Labeling Requirements

In-plant containers of hazardous chemicals must be labeled, tagged, or marked with the identity of the material and appropriate hazard warnings.

slide21

Break

Minutes

slide22
MSDS
  • Chemical manufacturers and importers are required to obtain or develop a material safety data sheet for each hazardous chemical they produce or import. Distributors are responsible for ensuring that their customers are provided a copy of these MSDSs. Employers must have an MSDS for each hazardous chemical which they use.*

* OSHA.gov

establish employee training
Establish Employee Training

Each employee who may be "exposed" to hazardous chemicals when working must be provided information and trained prior to initial assignment to work with a hazardous chemical, and whenever the hazard changes.

employee responsibilities
Employee Responsibilities
  • Know where to get information about hazardous substances used, stored, or handled at your inspection sites.
  • Learn to read labels and understand MSDSs.
  • Identify hazards before you begin a task.
  • Do not be afraid to ask questions.
  • Use personal protective equipment.
non routine tasks
Non-Routine Tasks

Supervisors should ensure that employees are informed of potential chemical, biological, and physical hazards associated with the performance of any non-routine tasks along with appropriate personal protective measures.

determination of hazards and personal protective equipment
Determination of HazardsandPersonal Protective Equipment

Job Hazard Analysis

Activity Hazard Analysis

Job Safety Analysis

hazard recognition
Hazard Recognition

Look at the BIG picture!

TREATMENT UNITS

CONFINED

SPACES

FLAMMABLES

BIOHAZARDS

AIRBORNE

MATERIALS

CHEMICALS

LABORATORIES

PHYSICAL

HAZARDS

hazard recognition means

THINK

PAY ATTENTION

DON’T DISREGARD

POSSIBILITIES

USE COMMON SENSE

HAZARD RECOGNITION MEANS:
  • understand normal operations & equipment, understand hazards, use imagination: what could happen?
  • be aware of surroundings and nearby activities
  • unlikely doesn’t mean impossible
  • getting away with it so far doesn’t make it safe or smart to do
case studies
Case Studies . . .

New York City Sanitation, November 1996

Michael Hanly, trash collector,

killed while standing behind his truck

as 70% hydrofluoric acid gas escaped

from containers under compaction

City workers in another location find

six plastic jugs of hydrofluoric acid

placed curbside with recyclables

niosh health hazard evaluations 1994

air samples from solids handling buildings &

headworks; 3 different WWTPs in 2 cities in

Missouri, 1 sampled in spring, 2 in fall

Results:

hydrogen sulfide: BDL up to 95 ppm

(NIOSH limit 10 ppm, OSHA limit 20 ppm)

> 45 other VOCs, mostly below NIOSH/OSHA limits:

toluene methyl ethyl ketone

dimethyl sulfide trichloroethanes

dimethyl sulfoxide 2-butanol

dimethyl trisulfide 3-methyl 2-butanol

NIOSH Health Hazard Evaluations 1994
palm springs police september 1995
Palm Springs PoliceSeptember 1995
  • Contractor spray painting; 2 dispatch center employees unconscious, 20 more exposed. Blood tests detect benzene and trimethylbenzene.
  • Sgt. C. Dewalt remains to operate dispatch 5-6 hours after hospital warns of health hazard. Dewalt later develops pulmonary, nervous system, cardiovascular, and musculo-skeletal problems.
  • Benefits were in dispute; Dewalt termed negligent, however, he was finally awarded WC.
fdep site investigation november 1996
FDEP Site InvestigationNovember 1996

FDEP Staff sample site contaminated with

Benlate fungicide and its breakdown product,

butyl isocyanate gas.

No information about possible hazardous

exposures provided to staff; no PPE used.

Employees suffered nosebleeds

and skin irritation onsite,

but did not leave.

facility inspector illness 1991
Facility Inspector Illness1991
  • Inspector encounters splashing droplets and mist from mixer at raw influent end of treatment system. No PPE provided or used, no signs, no abatement measures taken.
  • Inspector develops lung infection approx. 2 weeks later, becomes hospitalized, infection can’t be identified so source is unconfirmed.
  • Worker’s Comp denied.
hazard recognition heat stress
Hazard RecognitionHeat Stress

An employee experiences heat stress while investigating the derailment of a CSX freight train. The employee had to dress out in Level C (saranex suit) because the derailment released 40,000 gallons of sodium hydroxide. The derailment was located in a boggy area which necessitated him to trudge through thick mud and undergrowth; the weather was hot and humid. After about 30 minutes, the employee experienced weakness and lightheadedness. He was treated by EMS at the scene for electrolyte depletion and returned to duty that day.

hazcom summary
HAZCOM Summary

Protection under OSHA's HAZCOM Standard (HCS) includes all workers exposed to hazardous chemicals in all industrial sectors. This standard is based on a simple concept - that employees have both a need and a right to know the hazards and the identities of the chemicals they are exposed to when working. They also need to know what protective measures are available to prevent adverse effects from occurring.

that s all folks
That’s All, Folks!

Developed by

T. Michael Self, CPEA (Health & Safety)

Southeast District