1962 first close up view of venus via mariner 2
Download
1 / 19

1962 First close-up view of Venus via Mariner 2. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 143 Views
  • Uploaded on

1962 First close-up view of Venus via Mariner 2. 1965 First close-up view of Mars thanks to Mariner 4. It orbited Mars for three years following the encounter. 1973 Pioneer 10 is first to visit Jupiter. It is currently 8 billion miles from the Earth. Mariner 10 is first to visit Mercury.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about '1962 First close-up view of Venus via Mariner 2.' - jaden


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Slide2 l.jpg

1962

First close-up view of Venus via Mariner 2.


Slide3 l.jpg

1965

First close-up view of Mars thanks to Mariner 4.

It orbited Mars for three years following the

encounter.


Slide4 l.jpg

1973

Pioneer 10 is first to visit Jupiter. It is

currently 8 billion miles from the Earth.

Mariner 10 is first to visit Mercury.


Slide5 l.jpg

1979

Pioneer 11 gets first close-up look at Saturn.

Its last signal was received in 1995.


Slide6 l.jpg

1985

Uranus' first close-up by Voyager 2.


Slide7 l.jpg

1989

Voyager 2 takes first close-up of Neptune.

It is almost 90 Aeronautical Units

from Earth and still sends back

signals today.


Slide8 l.jpg

2001

New Horizons was proposed to AO-OSS-01,

NASA's Jan. 20, 2001, request for flyby mission

proposals to Pluto-Charon and the Kuiper Belt.

New Horizons was one of two proposals chosen

for further concept study in June 2001, and NASA

selected New Horizons as its Pluto mission on

Nov. 29, 2001. Led by Principal Investigator (PI) Alan

Stern of the Southwest Research Institute's Space

Studies department, the mission team included

major partners at the Johns Hopkins University

Applied Physics Laboratory, Stanford University,

Ball Aerospace Corp., NASA Goddard Space Flight

Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.


Slide9 l.jpg

2002

National Research Council's Decadal Survey for Planetary

Science ranked the reconnaissance of Pluto-Charon and

the Kuiper Belt as its highest priority for a new planetary

mission this decade.


Slide10 l.jpg

2004

INL builds its Space and Security

Power Systems Facility.


Slide11 l.jpg

January 12, 2005

New Horizons teams from across

the country gather at Cape Canaveral

to watch Deep Impact launch and

undergo first pre-launch run-through.


Slide12 l.jpg

May 2005

PI Alan Stern and Project Scientist

Hal Weaver lead team to discovering

two more of Pluto's moons. They are

43,450 kilometers (27,000 miles)

away from Pluto.


Slide13 l.jpg

2005

New Horizons’ RTG is built in just

nine months at INL. It is taken to

Kennedy Space Center in Florida

for pre-launch testing.


Slide14 l.jpg

January 2006

INL’s RTG is delivered to NASA and

installed in New Horizons just days

before the launch.


Slide15 l.jpg

January 19, 2006

New Horizons mission

successfully launches from

Kennedy Space Center at

14:00:00 PM. It was the fastest

launch ever at 22,000 miles per

hour.


Slide16 l.jpg

February 2007

New Horizons will reach Jupiter.

The craft will take close-up photos

and will be the closest flyby of the

gaseous giant. New Horizons will fly

through Jupiter's vicinity and gain

momentum like a slingshot through

its gravitational pull. Speeds will

increase to roughly 36,000 miles

per hour.


Slide17 l.jpg

2014-2015

First close-up photos of Pluto will

travel back to Earth in 4 1/2 hours.


Slide18 l.jpg

July 2015

Closest encounter with the

ninth planet. The closest

photographs will be 1,000

times the resolution of the

best pictures from the Hubble

Space Telescope.


Slide19 l.jpg

2016-2020

New Horizons exploration

of Kuiper Belt Objects.