The National Weather Service Goes Geospatial – Serving Weather Data on the Web - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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The National Weather Service Goes Geospatial – Serving Weather Data on the Web

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  1. The National Weather Service Goes Geospatial – Serving Weather Data on the Web Ken Waters Regional Scientist National Weather Service Pacific Region HQ Honolulu, Hawaii March 5, 2003

  2. Overview of the National Weather Service (NWS) • Established 1898 as the Weather Bureau • Now a part of the Department of Commerce and NOAA • NWS consists of 122 forecast offices, including one in Guam and Honolulu

  3. NWS Mission • Provide watches and warnings to save lives and property • Operate state-of-the-art numerical weather models • Maintain a vast amount of weather and hydrologic data, both real-time and historical

  4. NWS Warnings • Short-term warnings • Tornado • Severe thunderstorm • Flash flood • Longer-term warnings • Hurricane, river flooding, winter storm, wind • Very long-term warnings: • Climate and El Nino

  5. Numerical Models • Global models, especially the Global Forecast System (GFS, ex-AVN) • 80 km horizontal resolution out to 240 hours • Regional Models • Eta, Regional Spectral Model • Variable resolutions, some down to 8 km • Models are stored in GRIB format

  6. Observations • Satellite (in conjunction with NOAA/NESDIS) • Imagery (visual, infrared, water vapor) • Geostationary (GOES) • Resolution from 12 km down to 1 km • Data refresh from 5 to 15 minutes • Polar Orbiting satellites (POES) • View always changing; resolution down to 0.5 km

  7. Observations • Doppler Radar • 130 radar sites (4 in Hawaii, 1 in Guam) • Data refresh every 6 minutes • Surface data (automated stations, buoys, tide and river gauges) • Upper air data (2x daily balloon launches, ACARS on aircraft, atmospheric profilers, satellite soundings) • Climate Data, including cooperative network of weather observers

  8. Many Disparate Data Formats • GRIB (model data) • netCDF (most data as stored at forecast offices) • GINI (satellite) • Archive II (radar) • BUFR (soundings) • McIDAS (satellite) • Gempak (model and synoptic) • METAR (surface weather observations) • Text (products such as daily forecasts)

  9. Where are we going? • Challenges • Many data formats • None in geospatial-friendly format such as shapefiles • Rapidly growing data bases • Working more with other federal agencies to share data • Determining presence on the Web • Making forecasts more user-oriented (pull technology rather than push)

  10. National Digital Forecast Database • National gridded database (2.5 km) of forecast data • Winds, clouds, rain/snow chance and amounts, temperature, humidity • Operational end of 2003 for CONUS, 2004 for Alaska/Pacific • Three forms: • GRIB2 binary format for high-end users • Imagery posted on the Web • Legacy text products such as city forecasts, sampled from the grids rather than hand-edited

  11. National Digital Forecast Database • Example of Max Temperature forecast grid image at 5 km resolution • More info: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/NDFD

  12. ArcIMS Efforts • Current team recommending prototype project for this summer’s hurricane season • Will run off of a server in NWS HQ (Silver Spring MD) • Will combine track forecast of hurricane, near-real-time rainfall grids plus typical shapefiles (roads, counties, cities, etc.) • Targeted towards the Emergency Management community with the hopes that it can be used in decision-making regarding landfall of a hurricane

  13. Dynamic application to help decision-makers integrate NWS forecasts and data

  14. Warnings • Incorporate polygon information from short-term warnings into shapefiles for ArcIMS

  15. Future Efforts • Deploy the National Digital Forecast Database grids (GRIB2 GRID) in an IMS application • Convert most NWS data sets into shapefile/grid format to allow a multitude of IMS applications

  16. Questions? This presentation can be found at: http://www.prh.noaa.gov/hq/wx_rug.ppt Ken.waters@noaa.gov http://www.prh.noaa.gov (808) 532-6413 737 Bishop St., Ste 2200 Honolulu HI 96825