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Higher Education Community Engagement Model. Penny Wilson, Head of Community Affairs, University of Cambridge. Office of External Affairs and Communications. Background.

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higher education community engagement model

Higher Education Community Engagement Model

Penny Wilson, Head of Community Affairs, University of Cambridge

Office of External Affairs and Communications

background
Background
  • The Higher Education Community Engagement Model was developed by twelve Russell Group universities in conjunction with The Corporate Citizenship Company (TCCC).
  • The model attempts to quantify community engagement activities and provides useful qualitative information about what public engagement activities are happening across an institution.
  • It’s not “the answer” – but it’s a good starting point!
cambridge experience top line data
Cambridge experience – top line data

The survey found that, in 2005-06:

  • 3,000 members of University staff were involved in outreach of some kind. Together they gave more than 285,000 hours of their time.
  • 5,250 students took part in a voluntary activity, giving over 85,000 hours of their time.
  • This staff and student time is estimated to be worth £4 million to the community.
  • More than 1 million people benefited from voluntary activities undertaken by University staff and students.
  • 300,000 pupils and 6,000 teachers took part in face-to-face activities run by the University.
  • Around £1 million was raised and donated to charity by University staff and students.
cambridge experience
Cambridge experience
  • 3 surveys in 2002-03, 2003-04 and 2005-06
  • By 2006 all Colleges, Departments, student societies and most admin departments were surveyed – high response rate
  • Surveyed departments not people – and “went in” at different levels
  • For some answers we let respondents decide on categorisation
  • Gives numbers, but also gives invaluable qualitative information
  • It was a huge job!
what we learnt 1
What we learnt - 1
  • Model basic but need basic knowledge before can take to next stage
  • Senior buy in essential
  • What are the boundaries of what we’re measuring – what’s in and what’s out
  • Record keeping at respondent end can be limiting
  • We think it’s more important to have some imperfect information than none at all
what we learnt 2
What we learnt - 2
  • Don’t make it too complicated for respondents
  • Increases in activity probably due to improved data capture
  • Show people what you do with their information
  • Excellent to build profile of community function and of public engagement
  • Difficult to benchmark with other universities
what next
What next
  • Next Cambridge survey in 2010
  • We haven’t even started on impact (except for individual activities)
  • We haven’t worked enough with our communities on measurement
further information
Further information
  • Full guide at www.warwick.ac.uk/go/hecommunityhub
  • Cambridge reports at www.admin.cam.ac.uk/offices/communications/community/report/
  • Penny Wilson, [email protected]
higher education community engagement model1

Higher Education Community Engagement Model

Penny Wilson, Head of Community Affairs, University of Cambridge

Office of External Affairs and Communications

what the model maps what s included
What the model maps - What’s included?

Examples:

  • Pro bono support for charitable activities, e.g. professional expertise on conservation, veterinary science, feasibility studies or business plans.
  • Rooms, facilities and equipment lent/given to voluntary organisations and schools
  • Educational outreach activities, including online resources, video conferencing, lectures for schools, Science Festival activities and summer schools.
  • Museums’ community education programmes.
  • Public open days and lectures.
what the model maps what s included1
What the model maps - What’s included?

More examples:

  • Students running community-focused activities, such as a befriending service for elderly people.
  • Work placements and work experience.
  • Students and staff raising funds for charity.
  • Subsidised cultural activities for the general public.
  • Staff undertaking volunteering activities, for example reading projects in schools, mentoring or serving as charity trustees or school governors.
what the model maps motivation
What the model maps - Motivation
  • Charitable gifts (responding to community needs and requests with minimal expectation of a return for the University).
  • Community investment (investing in particular issues because they are in the University’s interests long-term, so looking for a ‘win-win’)
  • Core initiatives in the community (meeting the core needs of the University as the primary motivation, but structured in such a way as to deliver additional benefits to the community)
what the model maps subject focus
Young people and children

Health

Environment and conservation

Education

Criminal justice

Refugees and asylum seekers

Community

Disability

Older people

Cultural and religious

Arts

Sports

Not known

What the model maps - Subject focus
what the model maps type of organisation
What the model maps - Type of organisation
  • School/college
  • Community group
  • Charity
  • Public sector
  • Public-private partnership
what the model maps geographic area
What the model maps - Geographic area
  • Local
  • Regional
  • National
  • International
what the model maps university unit
What the model maps - University unit
  • University core
  • Department
  • College
  • Cultural and sport
  • Students
cash and in kind
Cash and in kind
  • Value of cash contributions
  • Value of in-kind contributions
  • Management costs
what the model maps staff volunteering
What the model maps - Staff volunteering
  • Number of staff involved in university time
  • Staff hours during university time
  • Number of staff involved in own time
  • Staff hours during their own time

Then valued at agreed rate.

what the model maps student volunteering
What the model maps - Student volunteering
  • Students involved in activities organised by university
  • Student time in activities organised by university
  • Students involved in activities organised elsewhere
  • Student time in activities organised elsewhere

Then valued at agreed rate.

what the model maps leverage
What the model maps - Leverage
  • Money raised by staff
  • Money raised by students
  • Money raised by other external partners
what the model maps beneficiaries
What the model maps - Beneficiaries
  • Number of organisation beneficiaries
  • Number of individual direct beneficiaries
further information1
Further information
  • Full guide at www.warwick.ac.uk/go/hecommunityhub
  • Cambridge reports at www.admin.cam.ac.uk/offices/communications/community/report/
  • Penny Wilson, [email protected]
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