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Winter 2007 SISAF 444 Africa Studies Seminar Enterprise and Business Top ten countries by GDP Top ten countries by GDP Average for Sub-Saharan Africa Top ten countries by population Top ten countries by population Average for Sub-Saharan Africa Source: Heritage Foundation

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Winter 2007

SISAF 444 Africa Studies Seminar

Enterprise and Business



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Top ten countries by GDP

Average for Sub-Saharan Africa



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Top ten countries by population

Average for Sub-Saharan Africa



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Doing Business

  • On average, it takes a business in a rich nation six procedures, 8 percent of income per capita, and 27 days to get started

  • In a poor or lower-middle-income economy, the same process takes 11 procedures, 122 percent of income per capita, and 59 days.

  • In more than a dozen poor countries, registering a new business takes more than 100 days

    World Bank, Doing Business 2005


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Doing Business … in Africa (2006)

World Bank

http://www.doingbusiness.org/documents/2006-Sub_Saharan.pdf


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Doing Business … in Africa


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Doing Business … in Africa


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Doing Business … in Africa


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Doing Business … in Africa


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Doing Business … in Africa


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Doing Business … in Africa


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Doing Business … in Africa

Ease of hiring, flexibility of working hours, ease of firing


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Doing Business … in Africa


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Doing Business … in Africa


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Doing Business … in Africa


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Doing Business … in Africa


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Doing Business … in Africa


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Doing Business … in Africa


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Doing Business … in Africa


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Doing Business … in Africa


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Doing Business … in Africa


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Doing Business … in Africa


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Doing Business … in Africa


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Doing Business … in Africa


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Doing Business … in Africa


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Doing Business … in Africa




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Mbeki 2005:“The Fundamental Problem”

“The enormous power imbalance between the political elite and key private-sector producers”

“Structural powerlessness of producers and their inability to retain and control their savings”


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Mbeki 2005:“What Africa Needs”

  • New financial institutions

  • The power of private ownership

  • Reduce rent-seeking and gvt. monopsony

  • Protecting the rights of private-sector producers (agriculture/industry/services)


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Formal and informal sectors: three cases

  • Marginal informality

  • Widespread informality

  • Dominant informality


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Formal and informal sectors: three cases

  • Marginal informality:

    In developed countries informal sector “free-rides” on a well-functioning and well-regulated market economy


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Formal and informal sectors: three cases

  • Widespread informality:

    An ‘exclusive state’ limits enforcement of economic rights, low transaction costs for elite sectors and insiders, and high transaction costs for the informal sector


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Formal and informal sectors: three cases

  • Dominant informality:

    Complete‘marketization of the state’, formal sector is marginalized or disappears, a ‘roadblock state’ means that long-term investments become impossible, the state approaches failure.


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Dominant informality…and the ‘marketization of the state’

“Everything is for sale, everything is bought in our country. And in this traffic, holding any slice of public power constitutes a veritable exchange instrument, convertible into illicit acquisition of money or other goods”

Joseph Mobutu, President of Zaire


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Dominant informality…and state failure

Stephen Ellis, The Roots of African Corruption(Current History, May 2006)


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Formal and informal sectors: three cases

  • Marginal informality: Developed countries, informal sector “free-rides” of well-functioning and regulated market economy

  • Widespread informality: ‘exclusive state’ limits enforcement to elite sectors and insiders, high transaction costs for informal sector

  • Dominant informality: ‘marketization of the state’, formal sector is marginalized or disappears





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Doing Business … in Africa


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