street fiction and the english language arts classroom n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Street Fiction and the English/Language Arts Classroom PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Street Fiction and the English/Language Arts Classroom

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 9

Street Fiction and the English/Language Arts Classroom - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 182 Views
  • Uploaded on

Street Fiction and the English/Language Arts Classroom . Tamika Robinson Dr. Donovan Teaching Young Adult Literature May 2, 2011. What is Street Fiction?. Also called urban fiction, hip novels, black pulp fiction, ghetto lit, and gangsta lit.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Street Fiction and the English/Language Arts Classroom' - italia


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
street fiction and the english language arts classroom

Street Fiction and the English/Language Arts Classroom

Tamika Robinson

Dr. Donovan

Teaching Young Adult Literature

May 2, 2011

what is street fiction
What is Street Fiction?

Also called urban fiction, hip novels, black pulp fiction, ghetto lit, and gangsta lit.

Literature that reflects urban life and its harsh realities such as drugs, sex, violence.

Target audience: African Americans from teens to forty-year-olds.

Readership: working class that live in urban areas similar to those depicted in the books.

what is street fiction1
What is Street Fiction?

The genre began with The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1966) and Manchild in the Promised Land by Claude Brown (1965)

Street Fiction authors of the 1970s like Iceberg Slim and Donald Giones set the tone for this genre.

Street Fiction reemerged in the 1990s with Omar Tyree’s Flyy Girl (1996) and Sister Souljah’sThe Coldest Winter Ever (1999).

Some novels make connections to the hip- hop culture.

street fiction controversies
Street Fiction Controversies
  • Glorifies the negative aspects of urban life
  • Belittles black women and demeans black men
  • Pornographic jacket covers
  • Lacks positive morals
  • Poorly edited
using street fiction in the english classroom how
Using Street Fiction in the English Classroom (How)

Editing texts for grammar, syntax, style, and factual consistency.

Bridging canonical and contemporary literature.

Writing different creative forms of the text.

Publish through new media outlets, book reviews, traditional and street fiction publishing houses.

Exploring problematic themes and connecting them to society.

using street fiction in the english classroom why
Using Street Fiction in the English Classroom (Why)

Relevancy to urban students.

Culturally Responsive Teaching: using diversity as an asset.

Tales act as a caution to young readers.

There is street fiction geared toward teen audiences with age-appropriate content and messages as well.

Ultimately, the same critical eye used to assess other literary genres should be used with street fiction.

street fiction for teens
Street Fiction for Teens
  • To be a man by Anne SchraffLike a broken doll by Anne SchraffOutrunning the darkness by Anne SchraffStep to this by Nikki CarterRetaliation by Yasmina ShirazThe Bully by Paul LanganJaded by Monica McKayhanThe trouble with a half moon by Danette VigilanteFirst Semester by Cecil R. CrossFast Forward by CelestNorfleetSpin it like that by Chandra R. Taylorand many more...
sources
Sources
  • Agosto, Denise E.; Cottman, Darren T.; Hughes-Hassell, Sandra; Morris, Vanessa J. . "Street Lit: Flying Off Teen Fiction Bookshelves in Philadelphia Public Libraries. (cover story)." Young Adult Library Services 5.1 (2006): 16-23. Education Research Complete. EBSCO. Web.
  • Fialkoff, Francine. "Street Lit Takes a Hit." Library Journal Feb. 2006: 8. Education Research Complete. EBSCO. Web.
  • Hill, M., B. Pérez, and D. Irby. "Street Fiction: What Is It and What Does It Mean for English Teachers? " English Journal  97.3 (2008): 76-81. 
  • Honig, Megan. "Takin' it to the Street: TEENS AND STREET LIT." Voice of Youth Advocates 31.3 (2008): 207-211. Education Research Complete. EBSCO. Web.
sources1
Sources
  • Johnson, Angela. Sweet, Hereafter. New York: Simon & Schuster for Young Readers, 2010. Print.
  • Marcou, Daniel. "Urban Teen | Street Fiction: Urban Fiction Author Interviews, Urban Fiction News, and Urban Fiction Book Reviews." Street Fiction: Urban Fiction Author Interviews, Urban Fiction News and Urban Fiction Book Reviews. Apr. 2007. Web. <http://www.streetfiction.org/category/genres/urban-teen/>.
  • Marshall, Elizabeth, Staples, Jeanine, and Gibson, Simone. "Ghetto Fabulous: Reading Black Adolescent Femininity in Contemporary Urban Street Fiction." Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy 53.1 (2009): 28-36. Education Research Complete. EBSCO.
  • Stairs, Andrea J. "Culturally Responsive Teaching: The Harlem Renaissance in an Urban English Class." English Journal 96.6 (2007): 37-42. Print.