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    1. Problems with Papers Mostly APA Stuph plus a tiny dose of GRAMMAR!!!!!

    3. Justification & Spacing Dont justify text APA says to use double spacing, research says 1.5 spacing is easier to read. Either is Ok, but I prefer 1.5.

    4. Cite all authors up to 6 When I see this: According to Roblyer et al. (1997), studies suggest . . . And then check the Bibliography and see that there are THREE authors for this article, the citation should be: According to Roblyer, Edwards and Havriluk (1997), studies suggest . . .

    5. IF there are more than Six authors: In text, use first author only: (Schmoe et al., 1999). But in reference list, include all names.

    6. And Dots!!! Ellipsis points to indicate omissions in quotes: Three points, separated by spaces within sentences: Schmoe, Verboze, and Schnoz claim in 1970 . . . the 428 Hemi was a killer V-8 application. Use four points to indicate that an entire sentence was omitted.

    7. More Common Errors Factual comments need citations: Computer anxiety is easily overcome in as little as 10 minutes by playing video games. If opinion, say so: This writer believes that children will benefit from using Galaxy Whiz to learn basic chemistry.

    8. APA Headings in Text Body Helps readers organize text Helps writers organize text Most writers only need two levels (1 & 3) (link to example-slide 28) or Three levels (1,3 & 4) (link to example-slide 27)

    9. Quotes Quiz: What is wrong with. Blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah and blah or blah, but Alessi and Trollip proposed these stages: (1) the presentation of information or learning experiences; (2) initial guidance as the student struggles to understand the information or execute the skill to be learned; (3) extended practice to provide fluency or speed or to ensure retention; and (4) the assessment of student learning

    10. No Page number More than 40 words so block Quote:

    11. Blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah and blah or blah, but Alessi and Trollip proposed these stages:

    12. Block Quote Additional Increase left margin by 1 Do NOT change right margin Do NOT indent first line of first paragraph Do Indent subsequent paragraphs

    13. Short Quotations

    14. Reference problems ??

    15. Reference problems ??

    16. The Right Way Horschepouer, L. O., Tranny, E., & Morspeed, F. (1998). The effect of underage children driving muscle cars on fifth grade language acquisition. Journal of American Performance Cars, 66 (8), 34-42.

    17. Journal Article; Single Author

    18. Chapter in a Book

    19. Electronic Sources

    20. Electronic Sources Online Article-Internet Only journal Frederickson, B. L. (2000, March 7). Cultivating positive emotions to optimize health and well-being. Prevention & Treatment, 3, Article 0001a. Retrieved October 15, 2001, from http://journals.apa.org/prevention/vol3pre0030001a.html

    21. IT

    24. A common sighting: It is important for teachers to have a high level of awareness of what type of software fits with their type of lesson, project, or unit plan.

    25. How bout That teachers have a high level of awareness of what type of software fits with their type of lesson, project, or unit plan is important.

    26. Or even better: Importantly, teachers need to have a high level of awareness of what type of software fits with their type of lesson, project, or unit plan.

    27. So Who Is This Bozo? rO is Manuscript review board member for: Computers in the Schools (Nationally Refereed) Journal of Educational Computing Research (Nationally Refereed) Journal of Research on Computing in Education Internationally Refereed) Journal of Computing in Childhood Education Nationally Refereed) Computers in Human Behavior (Internationally Refereed)

    28. Design of the Study Sample The sample was preservice education students, ages 18 to 50, (M = 24.7), enrolled in an introductory computer course at a mid-Eastern university of 17,000 students. The sample was blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah Dependent measures Stages of concern. The sample completed a version of the Stages of Concern (SoC) instrument, developed by Hall, George, and Rutherford, (1977) at the beginning of the course and blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah Attitudes toward technology. The Attitudes Toward Personal and School Use of Computers (ATPSC) instrument designed by Troutman (1991), was utilized because it breaks blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah Achievement. A two-part, final exam was used to assess achievement. The first part tested declarative knowledge on various learning theories, and methods of classroom technology blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah Treatment Content. The single, two hour and 45 minute session per week, introductory computer course for preservice teachers was comprised of two major components. The first, the skills blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah Differences. Although both course sections included most of the same content, some differences were unavoidable. The campus course included a two week multimedia development blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah

    29. The Promise of Email Fast Personal Communication Email is extremely fast which allows efficient communication between individuals such as professors and students. Both students and faculty typically have very blah blah blah blah blah bl Access, Speed and Accuracy Computers are oblivious to time so email users can send/pickup messages any time they desire. Email messages, once sent, typically arrive at their destination within blah blah blah blah blah blah Mailing Lists Most email programs allow creation of mailing lists by collecting email addresses and storing them under a nickname. For example, a professor may create a nickname blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah Processing Messages Email messages can be treated the same as any digital document. Recipients can (a) save or edit messages, (b) forward messages to someone else or include the message as blah blah blah blah The Peril of Email Bothersome Notification Mentioned above is the automatic notification feature of some email systems that provide a screen notice and audible sound when an email message is received. Those who blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah Email Response Time The time required to read and respond to email messages escalates exponentially when all students have access to you via email and are responding to listserv blah blah blah blah blah blah Unrealistic Response Expectations When students understand that email travels exceptionally quickly, they often develop an expectation that a professor will respond to their email in an extremely short blah blah blah blah blah