slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
How Clean is Your Air and What Can You Do About It PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
How Clean is Your Air and What Can You Do About It

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 82
ishana

How Clean is Your Air and What Can You Do About It - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

116 Views
Download Presentation
How Clean is Your Air and What Can You Do About It
An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author. While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. How Clean is Your Air and What Can You Do About It Denis Corr, Ph. D. Corr Research www.corr-research.com Upwind Downwind Conference

  2. Acknowledgements Clean Air Hamilton Green Venture Julie Wallace, Ph. D. J. Wallace Associates Pat DeLuca Centre for Spatial Analysis McMaster University

  3. Mobile Monitoring of Neighbourhoods in Hamilton,

  4. City Air Quality Trends TSP PM2.5 NO2 SO2 Downtown Industry ROTEK A i r Q u a l i t y M o n i t o r i n g S p e c i a l i s t s

  5. 1952 Great Fog, London , England 11,000 deaths

  6. Epidemiology

  7. Current Summary of Percent Changes in Acute Mortality per 10 Units of Pollutant Talar Sahsuvaroglu, PhD, Senes 2012

  8. Deaths from Air Pollution Each Year

  9. Deaths from Air Pollution Each Year(Ontario Medical Association 2008) Toronto 2,100 Peel 700 Hamilton 186 - 440 Halton 330

  10. Health Effects/MortalityExposure to PM2.5 over a few hours to weeks can trigger cardiovascular disease–related mortality and nonfatal events; Longer-term exposure (eg, a few years) increases the risk for cardiovascular mortality to an even greater extent Greater risk may include the elderly, patients with preexisting coronary artery disease, and perhaps those with diabetes. Recent data suggest that women and obese individuals might also be at higher risk. Brook et al, Circulation 2010, 121:2331-2378: 80% of mortality is in over 65 year old groupOntario Medical association 2008For every $ of govt funds to reduce air pollution exposures, approx $50 to $150 is saved in the health care system and productivityCorr Research 2012

  11. Air Quality Health Index http://www.hamilton.ca/HealthandSocialServices/PublicHealth/AirQualityHealthIndexInfo.htm

  12. How Clean is Your Air?Not Clean Enough

  13. Turning Science into Action

  14. Mobile Monitoring What and where Is the air pollution Affecting the health Of the people of Hamilton

  15. Mobile Command Centre

  16. Instrument Rack Mounts

  17. Equipment for Mobile Monitoring Mobile platform with minimum 30 amp electrical supply and A/C Carbon Monoxide Continuous Monitor Nitrogen Oxides Continuous Monitor Sulphur Dioxide Continuous Monitor Particulate Continuous Monitor Two GPS Data Collection and Handling Geographic Information Systems

  18. Industry

  19. Emission Sources by Regions in Hamilton Flamborough/Waterdown NE Ind Stny Crk East Mtn

  20. National Pollutant Release InventoryTotal Point Source Emissions by Contaminant Tonnes

  21. What We’d Expect to See Carbon Monoxide – 66% Transportation, 23% Industry Sulphur Dioxide – 92% Industry, 5% Transportation Nitrogen Oxides – 57% Transportation, 37% Industry PM10 – 73% Open Sources/Road Dust, 18% Industry Note: MOE identified trackout/road dust resuspension as a major problem

  22. Residential Sample NO ppb Industry Wind

  23. (Higher Impacts on Women and Over 60s) Exposure to Traffic and the Onset of Myocardial Infarction, A. Peters et al, NEJM, Oct 21, 2004 Traffic Exposure and Myocardial Infarction

  24. Traffic ModellingJulie Wallace, CSPA, McMaster

  25. NO March 9th 2007 Traffic Traffic Industry Traffic

  26. School StudyMorning – Idling Vehicles

  27. Monitoring Vehicle at School

  28. Natural Experiment ppb

  29. Afternoon – Vehicle Engines Off

  30. Trackout/Diesel Trucks

  31. PM10 ROAD DUST Industry Ben Garden, Savas Kanaroglou, Pat DeLuca, Spatial analysis Unit, McMaster University

  32. Workshop Dec 11 2006Trackout/Road Dust Reduction 50 attendees including industries, suppliers and government staff

  33. Before Particulate After P. DeLuca, CSPA

  34. Noise BarriersAir quality improvement effects

  35. Noise Barrier EffectHighway Downwind QEW No Noise Barrier Noise Barrier

  36. Noise Barrier

  37. Total Health Effects of Traffic+Mapping

  38. McMaster Institute of Environment and Health A Public Health Assessment ofMortality and Hospital Admissions Attributable to Air Pollution in Hamilton Prepared by:Talar Sahsuvaroglu, PhD and Michael Jerrett, PhD School of Geography and Geology May, 2003

  39. Health Close-up Centennial/Queenston 15% mortality increase Wind

  40. SW Health Impacts– PM10 less than 500 Wind

  41. NE – Aggregated Health Impact Wind

  42. Neighbourhood Air Quality Hamilton

  43. Background

  44. ArcelorMittal Dofasco committed to fund a mobile air quality monitoring program in neighbourhoods across Hamilton in partnership withClean Air Hamilton.

  45. Other partners : Conserver Society - community/source identification Green Venture - community co-ordination/supportRotek Environmental Inc. - air monitoring/logistics/ data analysis/supportMinistry of Environment – monitoring equipment/vehicle Hamilton Public Health – community identification

  46. Methodology:-Measure individual pollutantsCalculate health impacts Sum for total impact

  47. Summary of Percent Changes in Acute Mortality per 10 Units of Pollutant Talar Sahsuvaroglu, PhD, Senes 2012