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CCE 125: Program Planning
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  1. CCE 125: Program Planning Monday & Wednesday 6:30-7:45 North Seattle Community College, IB 1409

  2. CCE 125: Program Planning • Candice Hoyt, Faculty • (206) 715-1878 (until 9 pm) • Office hours by appointmentchoyt@sccd.ctc.edu • http://facweb.northseattle.edu/choyt • Syllabus: • http://facweb.northseattle.edu/choyt/CCE125 • Online—Angel: • http://northseattle.angellearning.com/ • CCE 125 Program Planning (Hoyt - hybrid) W10

  3. Wednesday 2/17 • Learning Stories • Dramatic Play • Oral Stories • Writing Center

  4. Learning Stories for CCE 125 • Same as in CCE 135 • But only required to post when complete • Can post for feedback from peers • Can email to me for feedback/review up to 48 hours before final is due

  5. Learning Stories for CCE 125 3.4 Learning Story 10 points • Observe a child or a group of children engaged in an activity of their choice. Take photographs of the stages of their play that began with the child's initiative. Take notes on what the child or children say and do. • Write a Learning Story for this child that includes all four parts. • FORMAT: • Part 1: The Story • Part 2: What It Means • Part 3: Opportunities and Possibilities • Part 4: Responses (family, child, other teachers, children or adults) • DELIVERABLES: • (a) OPTIONAL: Post Part 1 online.OPTIONAL: Reply to each other. • (b) DUE 3/1 (4 points): OPTIONAL: Post Parts 1-3 online.OPTIONAL: Reply to each other. • (c) DUE 3/10 (4 point): OPTIONAL: Post Parts 1-4. OPTIONAL: Reply to each other. • (d) DUE 3/15 (2 points): DUE 3/17 (10 points):Post complete story online and present in class. OPTIONAL: Reply to each other.

  6. Dramatic Play • Value of dramatic play • Literacy • Knowledge (Worch, Scheuermann & Haney, 2009) • “Sociodramatic play” • Problem-solving • Turn-taking • Power-playing • Values (McEntire, 2009, “Dramatic Play: Bring It Back”) • Delay of Gratification (Cemore & Herwig, 2005) • Performances from books (Kraus, 2006) • Cautions • Gender play – this is where teachers need to watch carefully!(Frawley, 2005) • Not everyone fits into the story • Power-play

  7. Dramatic Play • Equipment/materials: • Prop boxes (Einarsdottir, 1996)(Stone, 2009/2010) • Books , songs, movies, … • Writing materials • Text • Drawing materials • Opal school, Portland* • Create center based on book they like • No: • Belts (for little kids) • Interrupts play • Swords, guns • Yes: • Try to have enough to go around • Old clothes – real grown up suits, etc • Clothes for the dolls (to match) • Tutus • Princess/fairy dresses and shoes … • Wigs? • Yes: • Scarves • Hats/helmets, cowboy hats • Shoes a little too big, and grown up shoes, boots • Aprons/vests/capes, wings • Feather boas • Towels & washcloths • Purses • Babies • Sheets for fort-building • Jewelry – Mardi Gras beads • Masquerade masks • Headbands / animals, etc • Animal tails • Face paint – arm paint • Gloves

  8. Oral Stories - Personal history • Oral stories when you were young (family/ school). • Family stories, “when I was little” • Not a lot of folktales/ fairytales • Tall tales – stretched the truth, “autobiographic” • War stories, didn’t like them as kids • History – story about previous generations • Fairy tales • Now – at home or school. • Family stories w/children • Current stories, not so much previous generations • Reminisce • Pam surprised about origins of fairy tales • New made-up stories • Make up My Little Pony story every night • Winnie the Pooh story each morning • Family-created fiction story • Fairy tales • Embellished fairy tales

  9. Oral Stories - fiction • Value of oral stories • Made-up stories(Fields, 2000) • Literacy: Spontaneous story-creating leads to writing • Imagination / inventiveness • Psychological release • Socialization – making up stories together • Folktales, etc • Literacy: Story-structure understanding – story is still story without pictures or book

  10. Oral Stories – biographic stories • Value of oral stories • Socialization • Making friends • Keeping friends • Defending your story • Working-class kids have more practice at this • Oral language dev. • Sometimes more important to provide than print (Kraus, 2006) • Cultural differences • Working class: • Emotion verbs • Dramatic gestures • More frequent stories • Parents contradict untruth • Middle class: • Emotion state words • Less frequent but equally as valued • Parents more gentle with correcting untruths or use technique to let it go

  11. Writing Center • Special area for writing • Writing materials • Text • Drawing materials • Other places for writing • Block area – block journal

  12. Oral Stories • 3.3 Oral Storytelling 4 pointsPresent and post story 2/22 • Tell an uncommon, 3 to 8 minute story by voice alone, without using felt cutouts or pictures. You cannot use these common stories: Three Little Pigs, Three Billy Goats Gruff, Goldilocks and the Three Bears, Little Red Riding Hood, or the Gingerbread Boy. • Please select a story that appeals to you and seems to fit your personality, and you will enjoy telling it to children for many years into the future. • Begin by saying, “Would you like to hear a story?” and then start, “Once upon a time...” Keep eye contact with your listeners the whole time. At the end, say, “And that was the story of...” or use a standard rhyme, such as, “Snip. Snap. Snout. My tale is told out.” • 3 to 8 minutes long • unfamiliar to at least two people in your group • using the standardany introductory and closing words. • maintaining eye contact with all listeners.

  13. Physical Science Activity 3.6 PHYSICAL SCIENCE (4 pts) • Develop a physical science experiment that you could demonstrate to children. It could involve air, water, light, movement, electricity, etc. The TV programs Mr. Wizard or Bill Nye, books in the library and the supplemental text are sources of ideas. These demonstrate a transformation that the children can observe and participate in a discussion about what will happen, describe the effect, and describe the result. • Demonstrating a transformation in front of the class. • Name each item, giving names to everything the class sees. • Ask description and prediction questions of the class. • What will happen? • What is happening now? • What happened? • Document the predictions and outcomes for each step. • Long spaces for children to document their understanding and do their own inquiry. • Wed 2/24 Assignment: Post detailed activity plan for teachers to try, including your experience presenting it.

  14. Process Activity • 3.1 Process Activity Chart (4 pts) • Select food item or something useful to make that children 3 to 5 years old would enjoy making with as little assistance as possible. Draw pages of a process chart for making that item. Try it out on children (so they can help each other figure out what to do). Use the Demonstration/Do/Review system as explained in class. Display your process chart in the classroom and describe to the group what happened. It must be a multi-step process and NOT the ones done in class or presented in the packet. • REQUIREMENTS • a four-year-old child could prepare the item (dangerous steps excepted) following a demonstration. • one to three words on each frame. • neat primary script printing using lower case letters. • implemented and described orally • Wed 2/24 Assignment: • Post pages of illustrated chart (preferred) or list of steps. • Bring illustrated chart to class.

  15. Due Tonight • D8: Oral Stories – post online