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Harvard Extension School Expo E-25; Section 8 (7:45PM-9:45PM). Instructor: Julie Anne McNary Please check your Elluminate Audio Wizard We will begin at 7:45PM. Expository Writing E25: Introduction to Academic Writing and Critical Reading Analyzing the Short Story.

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harvard extension school expo e 25 section 8 7 45pm 9 45pm

Harvard Extension SchoolExpo E-25; Section 8 (7:45PM-9:45PM)

Instructor: Julie Anne McNary

Please check your Elluminate Audio Wizard

We will begin at 7:45PM.

slide2

Expository Writing E25: Introduction to Academic Writing and Critical ReadingAnalyzing the Short Story

Online WebConference Via Elluminate SoftwareWebsite: http://isites.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=k64023Elluminate Room:https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2007009&password=M.3163A85F45E3980D9A1F3875B7EED6

overview
Overview
  • MORE Housecleaning – comments, drop box, text book, issues, most importantly, first conferences, and finally, The Writing Center;
  • Another call to arms…
  • Class Discussion and in-class writing exercise: The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien
  • The Aristotelian Appeals – how can we use this material when analyzing short stories
    • Your rhetoric exercises
  • Moving from your 1.3 outline to Exercise 1.4, First Draft of Essay #1
our book and chapters
Our Book and Chapters
  • ISBN #0-321-47583-6
  • Chapters we’ve read so far:
    • 1: Reading a Story
    • 2. Point of View
    • 3. Character
    • 4. Setting
    • 5. Tone and Style
    • 6. Theme
    • 13. Writing about A Story
  • Chapters assigned:
    • 7. Symbol
    • 8. Evaluating a Story
the writing center
The Writing Center
  • If you wish to discuss your work in progress with a Writing Center tutor you can send a request for an email consultation to writing_center@dcemail.harvard.edu.
  • Look at the Writing Center website for more information about what to include in your email: 
  • http://www.extension.harvard.edu/2009-10/resources/writing.jsp. 
some sample 1 2 exercises
Some Sample 1.2 exercises
  • Christine
  • Ruy
  • Timothy
  • Heather
  • Sample JAMc Comments – Stephanie
class discussion

Class Discussion

The Things They Carried,

By Tim O’Brien

classical rhetoric and the aristotelian appeals

Classical Rhetoric and the Aristotelian Appeals

The strategies we use when we write or speak persuasively

in class exercise
In Class Exercise
  • For the next twenty minutes, please think about one character you have read about in the various texts I have assigned in this course thus far.
  • If you were going to conduct a rhetorical analysis of that character, how would you go about doing so? Is that character an ethos-driven character? Does the character employ the pathetic appeal? the logical appeal?
strong paragraph structure again
Strong Paragraph Structure…Again
  • Clear, direct topic sentence that states some sort of claim;
  • Evidence and examples from the text that respond to and/or support that claim;
  • Transitions and coherent explication if you are addressing a complex claim with several points of connection;
  • YOUR ANALYSIS OF THAT EVIDENCE!!!
  • A sentence that both provides closure and helps transition into the next paragraph.
exercise 1 4 first draft
Exercise 1.4 – First Draft
  • Please refine and strengthen your introductory paragraph of Essay #1. Make sure to include a strong opening sentence, a quick summary of your story, your analytical question, and your thesis;
  • MAKE SURE TO GROUND YOUR ARGUMENT IN A CLOSE-READING OF THIS TEXT;
  • Then, build your body paragraphs from the outline you constructed in 1.3;
  • Make sure to look at your paragraph structure very, VERY carefully;
  • In your conclusion, feel free to expand on your thesis, perhaps even bringing your own life experience.