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Fundamentals of Capital Budgeting. The Capital Budgeting Process. Capital Budget Capital Budgeting Incremental Earnings. Cash Flows in a Typical Project. Forecasting Incremental Earnings. Operating Expenses Versus Capital Expenditures Operating Expenses Capital Expenditures.

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Fundamentals of Capital Budgeting


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    Presentation Transcript
    1. Fundamentals of Capital Budgeting

    2. The Capital Budgeting Process Capital Budget Capital Budgeting Incremental Earnings

    3. Cash Flows in a Typical Project

    4. Forecasting Incremental Earnings Operating Expenses Versus Capital Expenditures Operating Expenses Capital Expenditures

    5. Forecasting Incremental Earnings Operating Expenses Versus Capital Expenditures Depreciation Depreciation expenses do not correspond to actual cash outflows Straight-Line Depreciation

    6. Forecasting Incremental Earnings Incremental Revenue and Cost Estimates Factors to consider when estimating a project’s revenues and costs: A new product typically has lower sales initially The average selling price of a product and its cost of production will generally change over time For most industries, competition tends to reduce profit margins over time

    7. Forecasting Incremental Earnings Incremental Revenue and Cost Estimates The evaluation is on how the project will change the cash flows of the firm Thus, focus is on incremental revenues and costs

    8. Forecasting Incremental Earnings Incremental Revenue and Cost Estimates Incremental Earnings Before Interest and Taxes (EBIT) = Incremental Revenue – Incremental Costs – Depreciation (Eq. 9.1)

    9. Forecasting Incremental Earnings Taxes Marginal Corporate Tax Rate The tax rate a firm will pay on an incremental dollar of pre-tax income (Eq. 9.2) Income Tax = EBIT  The Firm’s Marginal Corporate Tax Rate

    10. Forecasting Incremental Earnings Incremental Earnings Forecast Incremental Earnings = (Incremental Revenues – Incremental Costs – Depreciation)  (1 – Tax Rate) (Eq. 9.3)

    11. Example : Incremental Earnings Problem: Suppose that Linksys is considering the development of a wireless home networking appliance, called HomeNet, that will provide both the hardware and the software necessary to run an entire home from any Internet connection. HomeNet will also control new Internet-capable stereos, digital video recorders, heating and air-conditioning units, major appliances, telephone and security systems, office equipment, and so on. The major competitor for HomeNet is a product being developed by Brandt-Quigley Corporation.

    12. Example Incremental Earnings Problem: Based on extensive marketing surveys, the sales forecast for HomeNet is 50,000 units per year. Given the pace of technological change, Linksys expects the product will have a four-year life and an expected wholesale price of $260 (the price Linksys will receive from stores). Actual production will be outsourced at a cost (including packaging) of $110 per unit.

    13. Example : Incremental Earnings Problem (cont'd): To verify the compatibility of new consumer Internet-ready appliances with the HomeNet system as they become available, Linksys must also establish a new lab for testing purposes. They will rent the lab space, but will need to purchase $7.5 million of new equipment. The equipment will be depreciated using the straight-line method over a 5-year life. Linksys' marginal tax rate is 40%.

    14. Example : Incremental Earnings Problem (cont'd): The lab will be operational at the end of one year. At that time, HomeNet will be ready to ship. Linksys expects to spend $2.8 million per year on rental costs for the lab space, as well as rent marketing and support for this product. Forecast the incremental earnings from the HomeNet project.

    15. Example : Incremental Earnings Solution: Plan: We need 4 items to calculate incremental earnings: (1) incremental revenues, (2) incremental costs, (3) depreciation, and (4) the marginal tax rate: Incremental Revenues are: additional units sold  price = 50,000  $260 = $13,000,000 Incremental Costs are: additional units sold  production costs = 50,000  $110 = $5,500,000

    16. Example : Incremental Earnings Plan: Selling, General and Administrative = $2,800,000 for marketing and support Depreciation is: Depreciable basis / Depreciable Life = $7,500,000 / 5 = $1,500,000 Marginal Tax Rate: 40% Note that even though the project lasts for 4 years, the equipment has a 5-year life, so we must account for the final depreciation charge in the 5th year.

    17. Example : Incremental Earnings Execute:

    18. Example : Incremental Earnings Evaluate: These incremental earnings are an intermediate step on the way to calculating the incremental cash flows that would form the basis of any analysis of the HomeNet project. The cost of the equipment does not affect earnings in the year it is purchased, but does so through the depreciation expense in the following five years.

    19. Example : Incremental Earnings Evaluate (cont'd): Note that the depreciable life, which is based on accounting rules, does not have to be the same as the economic life of the asset—the period over which it will have value. Here the firm will use the equipment for four years, but depreciates it over five years.

    20. Determining Incremental Free Cash Flow Converting from Earnings to Free Cash Flow Free Cash Flow The incremental effect of a project on a firm’s available cash Capital Expenditures and Depreciation

    21. Deducting and then Adding Back Depreciation

    22. Example : Incremental Free Cash Flows Solution: Plan: The difference between the incremental earnings and incremental free cash flows in the HomeNet example will be driven by the equipment purchased for the lab. We need to recognize the $7.5 million cash outflow associated with the purchase in year 0 and add back the $1.5 million depreciation expenses from year 1 to 5 as they are not actually cash outflows.

    23. Example : Incremental Free Cash Flows Execute:

    24. Example : Incremental Free Cash Flows Evaluate By recognizing the outflow from purchasing the equipment in year 0, we account for the fact that $7.5 million left the firm at that time. By adding back the $1.5 million depreciation expenses in years 1 – 5, we adjust the incremental earnings to reflect the fact that the depreciation expense is not a cash outflow.

    25. Determining Incremental Free Cash Flow Converting from Earnings to Free Cash Flow Net Working Capital Trade Credit The difference between receivables and payables is the net amount of the firm’s capital that is consumed as a result of these credit transactions Net Working Capital = Current Assets  Current Liabilities = Cash + Inventory + Receivables  Payables (Eq. 9.4)

    26. Example : Incorporating Changes in Net Working Capital Problem: Suppose that HomeNet will have no incremental cash or inventory requirements (products will be shipped directly from the contract manufacturer to customers). However, receivables related to HomeNet are expected to account for 15% of annual sales, and payables are expected to be 15% of the annual cost of goods sold (COGS). Fifteen percent of $13 million in sales is $1.95 million and 15% of $5.5 million in COGS is $825,000. HomeNet’s net working capital requirements are shown in the following table.

    27. Example : Incorporating Changes in Net Working Capital Problem (cont'd): How does this requirement affect the project’s free cash flow?

    28. Example : Incorporating Changes in Net Working Capital Solution: Plan: Any increases in net working capital represent an investment that reduces the cash available to the firm and so reduces free cash flow. We can use our forecast of HomeNet’s net working capital requirements to complete our estimate of HomeNet’s free cash flow. In year 1, net working capital increases by $1.125 million. This increase represents a cost to the firm. This reduction of free cash flow corresponds to the fact that $1.950 million of the firm’s sales in year 1, and $0.825 million of its costs, have not yet been paid.

    29. Example : Incorporating Changes in Net Working Capital Plan (cont'd): In years 2–4, net working capital does not change, so no further contributions are needed. In year 5, when the project is shut down, net working capital falls by $1.125 million as the payments of the last customers are received and the final bills are paid. We add this $1.125 million to free cash flow in year 5.

    30. Example : Incorporating Changes in Net Working Capital Execute:

    31. Example : Incorporating Changes in Net Working Capital Execute (cont’d): The incremental free cash flows would then be:

    32. Example : Incorporating Changes in Net Working Capital Evaluate: The free cash flows differ from unlevered net income by reflecting the cash flow effects of capital expenditures on equipment, depreciation and changes in net working capital. Note that in the first year, free cash flow is lower than unlevered net income (incremental earnings), reflecting the upfront investment in equipment. In later years, free cash flow exceeds unlevered net income because depreciation is not a cash expense. In the last year, the firm ultimately recovers the investment in net working capital, which adds to the free cash flow.

    33. Determining Incremental Free Cash Flow Calculating Free Cash Flow Directly

    34. Determining Incremental Free Cash Flow Calculating Free Cash Flow Directly Depreciation Tax Shield Tax Rate x Depreciation

    35. Determining Incremental Free Cash Flow Calculating the NPV To compute a project’s NPV, one must discount its free cash flow at the appropriate cost of capital

    36. Example : Calculating the Project’s NPV Problem Assume that Linksys’s managers believe that the HomeNet project has risks similar to its existing projects, for which it has a cost of capital of 12%. Compute the NPV of the HomeNet project.

    37. Example : Calculating the Project’s NPV Solution Plan From Example 9.4, the incremental free cash flows for the HomeNet project are (in $000s):

    38. Example : Calculating the Project’s NPV Execute

    39. Example : Calculating the Project’s NPV Evaluate Based on our estimates, HomeNet’s NPV is $2.862 million. While HomeNet’s upfront cost is $7.5 million, the present value of the additional free cash flow that Linksys will receive from the project is $10.362 million. Thus, taking the HomeNet project is equivalent to Linksys having an extra $2.862 million in the bank today.

    40. Other Effects on Incremental Free Cash Flows Opportunity Costs Project Externalities Cannibalization Sunk Costs Fixed Overhead Expenses Past Research and Development

    41. Other Effects on Incremental Free Cash Flows Adjusting Free Cash Flow Time of Cash Flows Accelerated Depreciation MACRS Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System

    42. Example : Computing Accelerated Depreciation Problem: What depreciation deduction would be allowed for HomeNet’s $7.5 million lab equipment using the MACRS method, assuming the lab equipment is designated to have a five-year recovery period?

    43. Example : Computing Accelerated Depreciation Solution: Plan: MACRS provides the percentage of the cost that can be depreciated each year. Under MACRS, we take the percentage in the table for each year and multiply it by the original purchase price of the equipment to calculate the depreciation for that year.

    44. Example : Computing Accelerated Depreciation Execute: Based on the table, the allowable depreciation expense for the lab equipment is shown below (in thousands of dollars):

    45. Example : Computing Accelerated Depreciation Evaluate: Compared with straight-line depreciation, the MACRS method allows for larger depreciation deductions earlier in the asset’s life, which increases the present value of the depreciation tax shield and so will raise the project’s NPV. In the case of HomeNet, computing the NPV using MACRS depreciation leads to an NPV of $3.179 million.

    46. Example : Computing Accelerated Depreciation Problem: What depreciation deduction would be allowed for HomeNet’s $6.5 million lab equipment using the MACRS method, assuming the lab equipment is designated to have a five-year recovery period?

    47. Example : Computing Accelerated Depreciation Execute: Based on the table, the allowable depreciation expense for the lab equipment is shown below (in thousands of dollars). Note that “Year 1” in Table 9.4 corresponds to our “Year 0”:

    48. Example : Computing Accelerated Depreciation Evaluate: Compared with straight-line depreciation, the MACRS method allows for larger depreciation deductions earlier in the asset’s life, which increases the present value of the depreciation tax shield and so will raise the project’s NPV. In the case of HomeNet, computing the NPV using MACRS depreciation leads to an NPV of $0.1917 million.

    49. Other Effects on Incremental Free Cash Flows Adjusting Free Cash Flow Liquidation or Salvage Value When an asset is liquidated, any capital gain is taxed as income Capital Gain = Sale Price  Book Value Book Value = Purchase Price  Accumulated Depreciation After-Tax Cash Flow from Asset Sale = Sale Price  (Tax Rate  Capital Gain)

    50. Example : Computing After-Tax Cash flows from an Asset Sale Problem: As production manager, you are overseeing the shutdown of a production line for a discontinued product. Some of the equipment can be sold for a total price of $50,000. The equipment was originally purchased 4 years ago for $500,000 and is being depreciated according to the 5-year MACRS schedule. If your tax rate is 35%, what is the after-tax cash flow you can expect from selling the equipment?