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New Flu? What can you do?. Pandemic Influenza. “Get Informed - Be Prepared” Lynchburg College. Fall 2009. Special Thanks. Seasonal Influenza. Pandemic Influenza. Seasonal Influenza. Occurs annually Peaks usually in December thru March in North America 36,000 deaths each year

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new flu what can you do
New Flu?

What can you do?

Pandemic

Influenza

“Get Informed - Be Prepared”

Lynchburg College

Fall 2009

slide3
Seasonal Influenza

Pandemic Influenza

seasonal influenza
Seasonal Influenza

Occurs annually

Peaks usually in December thru March in North America

36,000 deaths each year

Usually worse in frail, elderly, and very young

pandemic influenza
Pandemic Influenza

Rapid Global spread among humans

No seasonal preference

Comes in waves

Total duration is more than a year

Millions of deaths

Affecting the very young, 15-35 years of age, and the very old

slide6

Pandemics Do Happen!

H9*

1998

1999

H5*

2003

1997

2003-2006

H7*

1980

1996

2002

2003 2004

H1

H3

H2

H1

1977

1915

1925

1935

1945

1955

1965

1975

1985

1995

2005

1957

Asian

Influenza

H2N2

1918

Spanish

Influenza

H1N1

1968

Hong Kong

Influenza H3N2

*Avian Flu

3 2006 3 2009
3/2006- 3/2009

Phases of a Pandemic

reassortment mutation
Reassortment (Mutation)

New virus

Human

virus

Avian

virus

Avian

Reservoir

novel h1n1 flu swine flu
Novel H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu)
  • Detected in the US in April 2009
  • World Wide Pandemic by June 2009
signs and symptoms
Signs and Symptoms
  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Sore Throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Body aches
  • Headache chills and fatigue
  • Sometimes diarrhea and vomiting
when is it an emergency
In children

Fast breathing or trouble breathing

Bluish or gray skin color

Not drinking enough fluids

Severe or persistent vomiting

Not waking up or not interacting

Being so irritable that the child does not want to be held

Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough

In adults

Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath

Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen

Sudden dizziness

Confusion

Severe or persistent vomiting

Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough

When is it an emergency?

When in doubt…check it out!

contagious
YES.

Spreads through:

Coughing

Sneezing

Touching objects with flu on it and then touching your own mouth or nose

How long?

1-2 days before getting sick

to 5 to 7 days after symptoms begin.

Contagious?
prevention
Prevention
  • Cover your nose/mouth with a tissue
  • Wash your hands
  • Use hand sanitizers often
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth. [Germs spread this way]
  • If you are sick, stay home & keep away from others
  • You may return to usual activities after you have been without a fever for 24 hours
vaccinate when offered
Vaccinate When Offered
  • Seasonal Influenza vaccine to be offered late October
  • Novel H1N1 Flu vaccine planned for mid-late October and may need to be repeated 3 weeks after the 1st dose.
  • CDC has designated a priority list, i.e. health care providers [support persons], pregnant women, etc
antiviral medication
Antiviral Medication
  • Currently only recommended during the first 48 hours of sickness
  • Resistance is already evident
  • Not a cure- only shortens illness by 1day
  • Costs $50-70 without insurance
protect family
Protect Family
  • www.readyvirginia.gov
  • Make a kit
  • Make a plan
  • Stay informed
what if family is sick
What if Family is Sick?
  • Employees who are well but who have an ill family member at home with novel H1N1 flu can go to work as usual
  • Monitor your own symptoms every day
  • Use same prevention measures at home
contamination
Contamination
  • What surfaces are most likely to be sources of contamination? Germs can be spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth. Droplets from a cough or sneeze of an infected person move through the air. Germs can be spread when a person touches respiratory droplets from another person on a surface like a desk, for example, and then touches their own eyes, mouth or nose before washing their hands
  • How long can the virus remain viable on objects (such as books and doorknobs)?Studies have shown that influenza virus can survive on environmental surfaces and can infect a person for 2 to 8 hours after being deposited on the surface.
cleaning
Cleaning
  • Keep surfaces (especially computer keyboards, bedside tables, surfaces in the bathroom, kitchen counters and toys for children) clean by wiping them down with a household disinfectant according to directions on the product label.
  • Linens, eating utensils, and dishes belonging to those who are sick do not need to be cleaned separately, but importantly these items should not be shared without washing thoroughly first.
can i get it from eating pork
Can I get it from eating pork?
  • No
  • Eating properly handled and cooked pork products is safe.
more information
More Information

http://www.flu.gov

www.who.int/csr/en