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Investigating the Standards: Grades 6-12 Literacy in History/SS, Science and Technical Subjects. Statewide roll-out: CESA Statewide School Improvement Services In collaboration with Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. Standards-Based Assessments. Standards-Based Leadership.

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Investigating the Standards: Grades 6-12 Literacy in History/SS, Science and Technical Subjects


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    1. Investigating the Standards: Grades 6-12Literacy in History/SS, Science and Technical Subjects • Statewide roll-out: • CESA Statewide School Improvement Services • In collaboration with • Wisconsin Department of PublicInstruction

    2. Standards-Based Assessments Standards-Based Leadership Curriculum Common Core State Standards Standards-Based Reporting & Recording Curriculum Standards-Based Instruction Standards-Based Professional Development

    3. Today’s Agenda • Introduction to Common Core State Standards • Investigating the Portrait of a Literate Individual • Investigating the Standards for Reading Informational Text • Investigating the Standards for Writing • Determining Implications and Action Steps

    4. Purpose • To understand the underpinnings of the CCSS • To investigate the Grades 6-12 CCSS for Literacy in History/SS, Science and Technical Subjects • To learn a process that can be used to investigate the CCSS • To plan local investigations of the CCSS • To reflect about implications to your practice using these standards

    5. Statewide Roll-Out

    6. The Message The Roll-Out is an extended process toward full adoption. The process cannot/should not be rushed – it’s a marathon, not a race. This is one of many collaborative sessions on the CCSS. School/district teacher leaders are needed to lead the process locally. Our focus today is to learn HOW to investigate the disciplinary Literacy standards. We aren’t investigating all standards today. You will be given a process that can be duplicated in your school. We won’t be aligning today because alignment cannot be done effectively without careful investigation.

    7. To investigate, you will need … • Print out of: • Introduction to CCSS, pp. 3-8 • the Literacy in History/SS, Science and Technical Subjects Common Core State Standards, 6-12, pp. 60-66 • ELA Appendix A • ELA Appendix B • ELA Appendix C • The Investigations Guide • Highlighters • Pen or pencil • Tables for group work • Timer/timekeeper

    8. Ground Rules for Today Information-Giving Group Work & Recording • Attentive listening • Open mindset to receive new ideas and information • Note-taking • Open mindset • Professional conversations • Careful note-taking (for taking back) • Deep thinking • Recording of questions – to be addressed later

    9. Impetus for the Common Core State Standards • Currently, every state has its own set of academic standards, meaning public educated students are learning different content at different rates. • All students must be prepared to compete with not only their American peers in the next state, but with students around the world. This initiative will potentially affect 43.5 million students which is about 87% of the student population.

    10. CCSS Evidence Base • Standards from individual high-performing countries and provinces were used to inform content, structure, and language. Writing teams looked for examples of rigor, coherence, and progression. Mathematics Belgium (Flemish) Canada (Alberta) China Chinese Taipei England Finland Hong Kong India Ireland Japan Korea Singapore • English language arts • Australia • New South Wales • Victoria • Canada • Alberta • British Columbia • Ontario • England • Finland • Hong Kong • Ireland • Singapore

    11. Development of Common Core Standards • Joint initiative of: • Supported by: • Achieve • ACT • College Board

    12. The promise of standards These Standards are not intended to be new names for old ways of doing business. They are a call to take the next step. It is time for states to work together to build on lessons learned from two decades of standards based reforms. It is time to recognize that standards are not just promises to our children, but promises we intend to keep. Foundations for the Investigation Guide

    13. What’s the Big Deal? • The CCSS initiative is a “sea change” in education for teaching and learning! • The CCSS mandates the student learning outcomes for every disciplinary grade band (6-12 Literacy). • The CCSS forces a common language. Your staff will begin using this language. • Students will be tested and instructional effectiveness will be measured based on CCSS. • Federal funding is tied to CCSS adoption, implementation, and accountability. • English Language Arts and Mathematics CCSS are just the beginning. . .more subject area standards are being developed.

    14. What are the Common Core Standards? “Common Core Standards define the knowledge and skills students should have within their K-12 education careers so that they will graduate high school able to succeed in entry-level, credit-bearing academic college courses and in workforce training programs.” (NGA & CCSSO, 2010) http://www.corestandards.org/

    15. Why are common core state standards good for students? • College & Career Focus. It will help prepare students with the knowledge and skills they need to succeed in college and careers • Consistent. Expectations will be consistent for all kids and not dependent on a student’s zip code • Mobility. It will help students with transitions between states • Student Ownership. Clearer standards will help students understand what is expected of them and allow for more self-directed learning by students Foundations for the Investigation Guide

    16. A Vision for Implementation

    17. Investigating the Standards: CCSS Grades 6-12Literacy in History/SS, Science and Technical Subjects

    18. Overall ELA Structure K-5 6-12 ELA 6-12 Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science & Technical Subjects (complements content standards) Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C

    19. Integrated Model of Literacy • Strands are closely connected • Strands are foundational to every disciplinary content area Big Idea: “Reading and writing are about thinking and making meaning essential to understanding any content area”.

    20. Readiness for … College, Workforce Training, and Life in a Technological Society “Students need the ability to gather, comprehend, evaluate, synthesize, and report on information and ideas” (CCSS, p. 4)

    21. Readiness for … College, Workforce Training, and Life in a Technological Society Interdisciplinary approach to literacy emphasizes the need for today’s adolescents to be proficient in reading complex informational texts independently in any disciplinary area.

    22. Readiness for … College, Workforce Training, and Life in a Technological Society “Most of the required reading in college and workforce training programs is informational in structure and challenging in content; postsecondary education programs typically provide students with a higher volume of such reading than is generally required in K-12 schools and comparatively little scaffolding” (CCSS, p. 4)

    23. Readiness for … College, Workforce Training, and Life in a Technological Society “The needs of the workplace are “increasingly indistinguishable” from the knowledge and skills needed for college success” (American Diploma Project, 2008)

    24. Readiness for … College, Workforce Training, and Life in a Technological Society “Think of literacy as a spine; it holds everything together. The branches of learning connect to it, meaning that all core content teachers have a responsibility to teach literacy” (Gates Foundation)

    25. Ready for College andReady for Work What does it mean to be ready for college? • Ability to begin college: • Without need for remedial or developmental course work • With a reasonable chance to be successful in entry-level credit-bearing courses (75% chance of a C or better or 50% > B) • ACT Research: “A First Look at the Common Core and College and Career Readiness”

    26. Ready for College andReady for Work What does it mean to be ready for work? Ability to successfully enter job training for jobs that: • Pay a wage sufficient to support a family • Offer the potential for career advancement O*NET™ (US Department of Labor) Zone 3 jobs meet these criteria. U.S. Department of Labor Employment & Training Administration

    27. ACT Tested Wisconsin Graduates – Class of 2010 Likely to Be Ready for College-Level Coursework (in percent) 75% 66% 60% 53% 52% 43% 38% 31% 29% 24% Reading Source: ACT 2010 College Readiness Report for Wisconsin – 47,755 students from 2010 Graduating Class

    28. Skills Needed to Succeed in College (Conley et al., 2007) Thinking & Literacy Skills in All Disciplines • Read to infer/interpret/draw conclusions. • Support arguments with evidence. • Resolve conflicting views encountered in source documents. • Solve complex problems with no obvious answer.

    29. Thinking and Literacy Skills • Ability to navigate and comprehend complex text in any discipline • What does that look like?

    30. Investigating Complex Text • Does the text: • Use sophisticated language structure? • Include unfamiliar vocabulary? • Require or infer certain level of background knowledge? • Require the reader to “work it” to understand it? • Require the reader to have interest and motivation in the topic to be able to comprehend? • Require scaffolding for the reader to become independent?

    31. Activity # 1 Activity #1: InvestigatingComplex Text Task: • Read the sample of Complex Text individually. • Use the organizer to individually reflect on: • How did you read the text in order to make meaning of the text? What strategies did you use? • In what ways is this considered a more complex piece of text? • What would have helped you to make meaning of the text? • What connections are you making to your students? • Discuss your reflections with your table partner(s).

    32. So, in thinking about the importance of complex texts for our students. . . We need to consider: • How students develop literacy skills K-12 • The impact of disciplinary literacy skills and the expectations of the CCSS on our instructional decisions

    33. How does literacy develop? Middle and High School Disciplinary Literacy Intermediate Literacy Basic Literacy (Shanahan & Shanahan, 2008)

    34. Disciplinary Literacy: CCSS Literacy Standards Disciplinary Literacy LiteraryFiction Mathematics Bio Science Phy Science History Social Studies Technical Health Fitness Humanities Intermediate Literacy Basic Literacy D. Buehl, in press, IRA

    35. Activity # 2 Investigating Disciplinary Texts Broad definition of Text: • Text refers broadly to any communication product: • oral (e.g., speeches, conversations, and audiotapes); • written (e.g., essays, stories, articles, novels, and poems); • visual (e.g. illustrations, films, or computer displays).

    36. Activity # 2 Activity #2: Investigating Disciplinary Text Task: • Reflect on your disciplinary content area and brainstorm examples of text materials that students should encounter and learn to navigate. • Use the organizer to capture your examples. • Discuss your examples with group members.

    37. Investigating the CCSS Standards CCSS Grades 6-12 Literacy in History/SS, Science and Technical Subjects

    38. Standards Documents Walk-Through Sticky note divider Use sticky notes to mark important sections • Introduction: pp. 2-8 • Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects, 6-12, pp. 59-66 • Appendix A (Research Supporting Key Elements of the Standards and Glossary of Key Terms), 43 pages • Appendix B (Text Exemplars and Sample Performance Tasks) -183 pages • Appendix C (Samples of Student Writing)- 107 pages INTRO LIT - CONTENT APPEN. A APPEN. B APPEN. C

    39. Key Design Features • CCR (College and Career Readiness) & Grade specific standards • Grade Bands • Focus on Results • Integrated Model of Literacy • Research and Media Blended • Shared Responsibility p. 4 in the standards

    40. College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards • Flowing throughout all strands of standards • Anchoring the document • Defining general, cross-disciplinary literacy expectations • Defining expectations that must be met for entry into college and workforce training programs • Expressing cumulative progressions through the grades to meet CCR by end of high school

    41. Activity # 3 Portrait of a Literate Individual Students who are college and career ready inLiteracy … • Demonstrate independence • Build strong content knowledge • Respond to varying demands of audience, task, purpose and discipline • Comprehend as well as critique • Value evidence • Use technology and digital media strategically and capably • Understand other perspectives and cultures p. 7 in the standards

    42. Activity # 3 Activity #3: Portrait of a Literate Individual p. 7 in the standards introduction • Read the descriptions of characteristics of a literate individual. • Discuss each student characteristic. What might this look like? • Take notes on the organizer. • Watch your time.

    43. Literacy in History/SS, Science & Technical Subjects

    44. K-5 Structure (Birds-Eye View) Progress with increasing levels of sophistication • Section • K-5 ELA Standards • by grade K through 5 • Strands: • READING & CCR Reading Anchor Standards • Reading Literature • Reading Informational Text • Foundational Skills (K-5) • WRITING & CCR Writing Anchor Standards • SPEAKING& LISTENING & CCR Speaking &Listening Anchor Standards • LANGUAGE & CCR Language Anchor Standards Across the Curriculum Standard 10 Range, Quality and Complexity of Student Reading K-5 & Range of Writing

    45. Progress with increasing levels of sophistication 6-12 Structure(Birds-Eye View) • Section • 6-12 ELA Standards • By grade & grade bands (6, 7, 8, 9-10, 11-12) • Strands: • READING & CCR Reading Anchor Standards • Reading Literature • Reading Informational Text • WRITING & CCR Writing Anchor Standards • SPEAKING& LISTENING & CCR Speaking &Listening Anchor Standards • LANGUAGE & CCR Language Anchor Standards Standard 10 Range, Quality and Complexity of Student Reading 6-12 & Range of Writing

    46. 6-12 Structure, continued Literacy in History/Social Studies,Science and Technical Subjects By grade bands (6-8, 9-10, 11-12) • READING & CCR Reading Anchor Standards • History/Social Studies • Science & Technical Subjects • WRITING & CCR Writing Anchor Standards • History/Social Studies, Science & Technical Subjects

    47. Literacy in History/SS, Science & Technical Subjects

    48. READING & CCR Reading Anchor Standards • Reading Informational Text (increasingly complex text)

    49. Genre: Informational Text Informational textis a kind of nonfiction text that includes exposition; argumentation and persuasive text; and procedural text and documents. • Expository text: (e.g. textbooks, reports, workplace documents, essays) • Argumentation and persuasive text: (e.g. writing to persuade, appeal to emotions, or sway an audience) • Procedural text: (e.g. “how-to” text, directions) • Documents: (e.g. primary and secondary sources)

    50. Activity # 4 College & Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading Page 60 CCR Categories forGrades 6-12 • Key Ideas and Details • Craft and Structure • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas • Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity Major Organizing Structure Throughout the Reading Standards Specific Standards are Provided in Each Category by Grade Level/Band