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Seasonal Carbon and Energy Fluxes for Restored Wetlands in the Sacramento – San Joaquin Delta PowerPoint Presentation
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Seasonal Carbon and Energy Fluxes for Restored Wetlands in the Sacramento – San Joaquin Delta

Seasonal Carbon and Energy Fluxes for Restored Wetlands in the Sacramento – San Joaquin Delta

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Seasonal Carbon and Energy Fluxes for Restored Wetlands in the Sacramento – San Joaquin Delta

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  1. Seasonal Carbon and Energy Fluxes for Restored Wetlands in the Sacramento – San Joaquin Delta Frank Anderson, USGS 9th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference, Orlando, Florida, June 8, 2012

  2. Goals • What are the atmospheric conditions that can lead to maximum wetland productivity • Annual Carbon Budget from a Temperate Wetland • Wetland Annual Variability

  3. Twitchell Island Wetland Met Tower (ET, CO2, CH4)

  4. Radiometers Upward & Downward PAR Sensors Diffuse Radiometer Kipp & Zonen 4-Channel Net Radiometer

  5. Eddy Covariance Instrumentation CSAT3 Sonic Anemometer HMP45C: Relative Humidity Air Temperature LI7500: CO2/H2O Intake for Closed Path LGR CH4 Sensor LI 7700 Open Path CH4 Sensor

  6. Twitchell Island Wetland Met Tower (ET, CO2, CH4) UCB Rice Met Tower (ET, CO2, CH4)

  7. Twitchell Island Wetland Met Tower (ET, CO2, CH4) UCB Rice Met Tower (ET, CO2, CH4) Feed Corn Met Tower (ET)

  8. Twitchell Island Wetland Met Tower (ET, CO2, CH4) UCB Rice Met Tower (ET, CO2, CH4) Maize (grain) Met Tower (ET, CO2) CIMIS Met Tower (Reference ET)

  9. Twitchell Island West pond Met Tower (ET, CO2, CH4) East pond Met Tower (ET, CO2) UCB Rice Met Tower (ET, CO2, CH4) Maize (grain) Met Tower (ET, CO2) CIMIS Met Tower (Reference ET)

  10. Study Site on Twitchell Island Alfalfa Sampling site Flux Towers West pond: 25 cm deep East pond: 55 cm deep Corn

  11. Calculating Eddy Covariance Flux EC Tower

  12. Calculating Eddy Covariance Flux Vertical Wind Component EC Tower

  13. Calculating Eddy Covariance Flux EC Tower

  14. Calculating Eddy Covariance Flux Net Upward Flux w’ = positive s’ = positive w’ = negative s’ = negative

  15. Calculating Eddy Covariance Flux Net Downward Flux w’ = positive s’ = negative w’ = negative s’ = positive

  16. w’T’ w’H2O’ w’CO2’ w’CH4’

  17. Annual Total: -351 g CO2/m2/yr -1.42 MT CO2/acre/yr

  18. Early Summer 2010

  19. To keep Carbon Sequestration rates high, need to • Maintain water levels • Remove or bury thatch (“lodging”) 2010 Vegetation Classification 56% classified as thatch (brown) 34% classified as emergent marsh (green) 2011 Vegetation Classification 16% classified as thatch (brown) 74% classified as emergent marsh (green)

  20. EP 2010/11: 5.11 MT CO2/acre/yr EP 2011/12: -1.29 MT CO2/acre/yr WP 2011/12: -1.42 MT CO2/acre/yr

  21. Fig 1 Fig 2 Continuous NEE (gapfilled 2010, 2000-2 DNDC) NEE (raw data – not gap filled) Fig 3 Fig 4

  22. Summer 2003

  23. Concluding Remarks • The Delta’s Mediterranean type climate can provide a long dry growing season with cool nights • Annual variation in the East Pond alternating from a source to a sink • The East Pond had 2 – 4 times higher NEE in it’s earlier stages

  24. Collaborators: Dennis Baldocchi, Matteo Detto, Joe Verfaillie, Jaclyn Hatala, Oliver Sonnentag UC Berkeley Lisamarie Windham-Myers, Kristin Byrd, Brian Bergamaschi, Travis von Dessonneck, Kathleen Keating, Robin Miller, Roger Fujii USGS

  25. Funding Acknowledgements This research is supported by: USGS Climate Change Program, California’s DWR Levee Program, and the USGS Cooperative Research Program

  26. Freshwater marsh restoration on subsided Delta islands (Peat fills the consistent 25-55cm accomodation space) “Carbon Farm” Lisamarie Windham-Myers, INTECOL, 2012

  27. Constant, large accomodation space Freshwater tidal wetlands accrete peat at average rates of only ~1.5 mm yr-1 (RSLR) Drexler et al. (2009) Wetlands

  28. Why does the Carbon Farm sequester more carbon than other restored wetlands? Leaf structure Stomate size and density Oxidized rhizosphere Typha latifolia Typha latifolila 50 mm Schoenoplectus acutus Schoenoplectus acutus THE PLANTS Moderate GPP w/high vertical LAI Tule: Lignified, aerenchymous, high stomatal density