data and access views from a research administrator and recovering meteorologist n.
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Data and Access: Views from a Research Administrator ( and recovering meteorologist)

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 16

Data and Access: Views from a Research Administrator ( and recovering meteorologist) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 88 Views
  • Uploaded on

Data and Access: Views from a Research Administrator ( and recovering meteorologist). Kelvin K. Droegemeier Vice President for Research University of Oklahoma UNT 3 rd Annual Symposium on Open Access May 20-21, 2012. A HUGE Spectrum. Zillions of small data;

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Data and Access: Views from a Research Administrator ( and recovering meteorologist)' - ilana


Download Now An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
data and access views from a research administrator and recovering meteorologist

Data and Access: Views from a Research Administrator (and recovering meteorologist)

Kelvin K. Droegemeier

Vice President for Research

University of Oklahoma

UNT 3rd Annual Symposium on Open Access

May 20-21, 2012

a huge spectrum
A HUGE Spectrum

Zillions of small data;

ubiquitous, streaming,unexpected, highly perishable, non-reproducible, geo-referenced,

mobile

Huge structured data;anticipated, well defined, streaming, fixed in space,reproducible

some of the key questions
Some of the Key Questions
  • Definition of DATA
  • Who owns it and when, and who decides?
  • What should be kept and who decides?
  • How and where should it be kept and who decides?
  • How is quality assured and who determines it?
  • Who provides access and who pays?
  • How is access provided and who decides?
  • Who is given access and when, and who decides?
  • When should access be denied and who decides?
  • Who provides technical assistance in using data?
  • How should credit be given for generating/maintaining data, and who decides?
  • Who ensures and pays for compliance?
data the way it was
Data: The Way it Was
  • Federal research agencies and laboratories
    • Money for research
    • Big iron
    • High capacity network backbone
    • Lots of storage
    • Special large and shared facilities (telescopes, ships, aircraft, accelerators)
    • Little compliance or policy apart from health-related information
    • Focus on physical science and engineering
  • Universities
    • Researchers (faculty, students, post docs)
    • Modest computing for data analysis and visualization
    • Links to backbone plus modest on-campus connectivity
    • Some storage
    • Coordination at department/college level with distributed IT management
data the way it s becoming
Data: The Way It’s Becoming
  • Federal research agencies and laboratories
    • Money for research
    • Big iron
    • High capacity network backbone
    • Lots of storage
    • Special large and shared facilities (telescopes, ships, aircraft, accelerators)
    • Significant compliance mandates, data management plans, IP implications
    • ALL disciplines now involved in data in VERY different ways!
  • Universities
    • Researchers (faculty, students, post docs)
    • Significant computing for data analysis and visualization
    • Links to backbone plus significant wired/wireless on-campus connectivity
    • Large storage
    • Local digital repositories
    • Components of data systems for federated data bases
    • Emerging interaction among Library, IT Leadership, Research Office, Academic Leadership at the institutional level
my role as vp for research
My Role as VP for Research
  • Assist faculty across all disciplines within a comprehensive research university in achieving their scholarly goals and dreams
    • Help locate and create opportunity
    • Help build collaborations internally and externally
    • Help define research program trajectories and prepare competitive proposals
    • Provide financial and other resources
    • Create incentives and rewards
    • Promulgate useful policies and reduce administrative burden
    • Ensure tight integration of instruction and research
    • Shine a bright light on achievement
    • Recruit and retain the best faculty and students – to continue the cycle
view from a vice president for research
View from a Vice President for Research
  • Key Point #1: Facilitating Research With Data
    • A means to tackle some of the most compelling intellectual challenges at the intersections of multiple disciplines
    • It’s not only about providing access but also helping ensure EFFECTIVE use of data – which is not automatic!
    • The institution must help: bring people together, stimulate conversations, bridge language barriers, build trust, guide thinking, provide support
    • Library has a unique role to play – a renaissance as the intellectual commons of our campuses
    • As IT has opened new doors and brought people/disciplines together, so can the “data challenge” if we handle it properly!
      • Especially critical for engagement of social sciences and the humanities
data don t guarantee understanding
Data Don’t Guarantee Understanding!

Numerical Simulation

24 hours CPU = 1 hour real

20 TB of output

Still trying to understand

Mother Nature

Real time!

Still trying to understand

view from a vice president for research1
View from a Vice President for Research
  • Key Point #2: Providing Credit and Support
    • System (but importantly also a philosophy) for giving credit to faculty for generating, maintaining, and provisioning data (similar to how IP has been added to portfolio)
      • Provost, Deans, Tenure Committees, Senior Faculty
    • Building data stewardship into research metrics aka citations, impact factors, etc
    • Creation of persistent identifiers/tags (EZID, DataCiteConsortium) – but also WHAT credit means
    • Creation of an indirect cost component for data and compliance
view from a vice president for research2
View from a Vice President for Research
  • Key Point #3: Logistics and Cost
    • Coordination and consolidation of data management approaches across the institution: Provost, Library Dean, CIO, VPR
    • Appropriate cyberinfrastructure, security, systems-level approach
    • Integration into the broader academic ecosystem
    • The strategies in which we invest today may be quite different in a short time – shifting sands
      • Division of responsibilities (local and national)
      • When will the dust settle regarding policies?
      • Unity versus diversity in approaches
    • Roles from Fran Berman’s recent article
      • Universities: Expand repositories (pay via fees, gifts, tuition, grants)
      • Agencies: Research, workforce, repositories, good policies
      • Private Sector: Capacity and services, partnerships, federation
view from a vice president for research3
View from a Vice President for Research
  • Strategy for OU
    • Just hired a new Dean of Libraries (Rick Luce)
    • Bringing in a blue ribbon visiting team to evaluate IT support of research in its broadest definition
      • Data issue is a key component of the agenda
    • Like some universities, OU doesn’t have a lot to “undo” in the way of a unified approach to data management
    • New coordination among Library Dean, CIO, Provost, VPR
closing thoughts
Closing Thoughts
  • Like so many things in our world, our ability to generate data has far outstripped our ability to utilize them effectively for research and decision making
  • In our necessary haste to make data available, we must also learn how to use data effectively
  • We’re now somewhat in a valley – data deluge has slowed progress in some ways and accelerated it in others
  • Some of the greatest advances in the history of civilization will be made in the next 50 years provided we can tackle the data challenge holistically (i.e., provision, effective use)