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Learning Objectives: You will understand background information relative to an author and novel. PowerPoint Presentation
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Learning Objectives: You will understand background information relative to an author and novel. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Learning Objectives: You will understand background information relative to an author and novel.

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  1. Monday, 15 November 2010 Due Today: Ø Bell-work: Please pick up a handout from the stool on the way to your seat. Learning Objectives: You will understand background information relative to an author and novel. You will review study guide questions, new vocabulary words, and character charts. You will read chapter one of the text. • Agenda: • TOTC Book #1 ~ “Recalled to Life” • Reading Schedule • Study Guide Questions • Vocabulary Chart • Background Information • TOTC Chapter 1 Reading • Writer’s Notebook #12:Book #1 Plot & Character Chart Homework: TOTC Chapters 1-3 TOTC Book #1 Study Guide TOTC Character Chart TOTC Book #1 Vocabulary Chart

  2. WN #12 11/15/10 Book #1 Plot & Character Chart Chapter Setting Characters Plot France = Violence & Religious Persecution England = Crime 1 “The Period” England & France X English Roads- Mistrust & Crime 2 “Mail” “Wait in Dover for Mam’selle” “Recalled to Life” Jarvis Lorry Jerry Cruncher English Roads- Travel between London & Paris. A sense of the gothic (dark descriptions, mysterious) Dosing off in the coach, Mr. Lorry dreams of and talks to a man buried alive for 18 years. Night Shadows are ghosts. 3 “Night Shadows” Jarvis Lorry A Ghost?

  3. Tuesday, 16 November 2010 Due Today: TOTC Chapters 1-3 Bell-work: Please open up to WN #12 and get out your TOTC study guide. Learning Objectives: You will actively read a text by anticipating themes and concepts. You will interpret and apply vocabulary as you read. You will use an online tool to help understand a complex text. • Agenda: • 2nd Term Grade Distribution • Writer’s Notebook #12:Book #1 Plot & Character Chart • TOTC Chapter 4 (30 minutes) Homework: TOTC Book #1 Chapter 5 TOTC Book #1 Study Guide TOTC Book #1 Vocabulary Chart

  4. Plot/Character Chart: Book #1 “Recalled to Life” Chapter 4 “Preparation” Setting England - The Dover Hotel Characters Jarivs Lorry, Lucie Manette, Miss Pross, Jerry Cruncher is further characterized. Plot Lorry steps out of the coach into the daylight. From darkness to light symbolizes a literal resurrection. He is preparing to tell Lucie & preparing Lucie to meet her father.

  5. Wednesday, 17 November 2010 Due Today: TOTCBook #1 Chapters 4 & 5 Bell-work: Please get out your vocabulary workbook and open up to page 131. Begin Analogies Lesson #6. Learning Objectives: You will solve analogies. You will identify motifs in a piece of historical fiction and learn more about Dickens. You will interpret and define vocabulary as you read. You will connect characters in our text. • Agenda: • Vocabulary Workbooks: Analogies Lesson #6 pg. 131 • Writer’s Notebook #12:Book #1 Plot & Character Chart • Writer’s Notebook #13:TOTC Background Information Continued • TOTCChapter 6 • TOTCNote Cards • TOTC Book #2 Study Guide & Vocabulary Chart Homework: TOTCBook #1 Study Guide & Vocabulary Chart due Friday TOTC Book #2 Chapters 1 – 2

  6. Plot/Character Chart: Book #1 “Recalled to Life” Chapter 5 “Wineshop” St. Antoine, France – poor city just outside of Paris, France. Setting Characters The Defarges & the 3 “Jacques” Plot The red wine cask that had shattered in the street & the people who flocked to it is one of the most memorable & referenced scenes in the book. The red stained hands symbolize the bloodshed to come 14 years in the future. Want, need, poverty, suffering, and hunger are all around.

  7. WN #13 11/17/10 TOTC Background cont. What is Serial Writing? • Basically, a serial is an ongoing story not much different from the format of a contemporary soap opera. • Just as "Days of Our Lives" gives the viewer a story that runs on in daily, manageable bites, serial stories break a story down into segments, keeping the reader coming back for more. • TOTC was originally published in weekly installments that lasted from April to November of 1859. • Serial stories provide people with a depth of story that can't be achieved in a short story. • At the same time, it provides deeper stories in small, easily digestible chunks. • Dickens’ attempt was to create a popular story full of suspense and intrigue that leaves many questions after the first few chapters. Some of the questions, like how Mme. Manette’s father came to be incarcerated for 18 years. • It takes patience to get through, but is ultimately very rewarding.

  8. A note on the Dickensian writing style … • Much of what Dickens wrote is considered to be gothic literature. • Gothic literature is a genre that establishes an uneasy, mysterious mood through the use of remote, desolate settings, supernatural or macabre events, and violence. • Gothic literature dominated much of fiction from the late eighteenth century through the end of the nineteenth century.

  9. The Route Between England & France Twentieth-century travelers have been able to make the one-way trip between London and Paris in just under six hours: they take a train from London to Dover, where they board a ferry on the 21-mile across the choppy English Channel to Calais. From there, they take a train to Paris. Since 1994, however, passengers can cut their travel time to a mere three hours by riding on a high-speed train through a tunnel beneath the English Channel, popularly known as the Chunnel. What would Jarvis Lorry and his traveling companions think if they were to see the Chunnel train hurtling through the country side at a starling 185 miles per hour?

  10. TOTCMotifs • Resurrection • Violence & Oppression • Self Sacrifice & Heroism • Revolutions • Doubles & Opposites • Shadows & Darkness • Imprisonment & Freedom

  11. Hallmarks of Dickensian Style • Parallelism: In grammar, parallelism is a balance of two or more similar words, phrases, or clauses. The application of parallelism in sentence construction improves writing style and readability. Parallelism may also be known as parallel structure or parallel construction. • Anaphora: repetition of a word or words at the beginning of two or more successive verses, clauses, or sentences.

  12. Jacques & Jacquerie • During a conversation in the wineshop, M. Defarge and three other men all refer to each other as “Jacques.” This identifies them as fellow revolutionaries. It is a password of sorts. The name is contemptuous The name comes from Jacques Bonhomme (Goodman James) a name the peasants used in contempt to refer to the novels in a French revolt in 1358. Therefore, “Jacquerie” is the term applied to any revolt of French peasants.

  13. Plot/Character Chart: Book #1 “Recalled to Life” Chapter 6 “Shoemaker” Setting St. Antoine, France – poor city just outside of Paris, France. Characters Dr. Manette In the garret of the wineshop, the prisoner is reunited with his daughter. He appears to has lost his identity. He recalls his own names as being 105 North Tower. The locks of golden hair of Lucie offer him some memory. His reaction is genuine. Lucie’s is a little unbelievable. Lorry & Defarge arrange for them to leave. He steps out from the garret into the day; from darkness to light. Plot

  14. Friday, 19 November 2010 Due Today: TOTCBook #1 Study Guide Bell-work: Please get ready to turn in your study guide questions for Book #1 Learning Objectives: You will identify motifs in a piece of historical fiction. You will learn more about Charles Dickens and his writing style. You will interpret and define vocabulary as you read. You will connect characters in our text. • Agenda: • Writer’s Notebook #14: TOTC Book #2 Plot & Character Chart • TOTCBook #2 Chapter 3 Homework: TOTCBook #2 Chapters 3 - 4

  15. Plot/Character Chart: Book #2 “The Golden Thread” Chapter 1 “Five Years Later” Setting Tellson’s Bank, Cruncher Apartment Characters The Crunchers: Jerry Sr., Jerry Jr., Wife Plot • Tellson’s Bank is described as being small, dark, ugly and grave-like. Mud is splattered on the windows and it is damp, but it is respectable. • Jerry Cruncher (bank employees) are getting ready at home to run errands together, and his wife is praying for him. Jerry gets angry and throws a boot at her. A domestic dispute ensues. • Something to remember … Jerry’s boots are muddy at night, and his son notices his rusty colored hands.

  16. Plot/Character Chart: Book #2 “The Golden Thread” Chapter 2 “A Sight” Old Bailey – Criminal Court in central London; near the Thames River & Temple Bar Setting Characters Prisoner Charles Darnay, An Eager Crowd, Barristers, Jarvis Lorry, Lucie (22) & Dr. Manette Plot • Darnay (a handsome man of 25) is on trial for treason (spying for the French King) – a crime punishable by quartering. • The crowd is eager to see him found guilty, and to see the violent execution. The case is an example of sensationalism. • Barristers are in black robes & white wigs. • Darnay sees two men & a woman enter the courtroom (Lorry, Lucie, and Dr. Manette). He learns they are witness for the prosecution. He sees terror and compassion in her eyes.

  17. Plot/Character Chart: Book #2 “The Golden Thread” Chapter 3 “A Disappointment” Setting Old Bailey Characters Darnay, The Crowd, The Jury, Barristers, Jarvis Lorry, Lucie & Dr. Manette, Attorney General (prosecuting attorney), John Barsard, Mr. Stryver (defense attorney), Roger Cly, Sydney Carton Plot • The Attorney General encourages the jury to find the prisoner guilty and to have hatred towards him. He urges them to find him guilty. • The Attorney General calls the first witness, John Barsard, to the stand. Barsard is a patriot who felt obligated to turn in Darnay. • Mr. Stryver exposes that Barsard served time in a debtor’s prison, so his testimony is unreliable. • The Attorney General calls forward Robert Cly to testify. Cly was Darnay’s former servant and claims he witnessed Darnay deliver information to Frenchmen. • Mr. Stryver exposes Cly as a fraud because he has stolen in the past. His proves him to be untrustworthy.

  18. Plot • Jarvis Lorry is called forward, but claims that he cannot say definitively that Darnay was in the coach as he traveled to France or when traveling back from France. • A terrified Lucie is called to the stand. She admits meeting the prisoner on the ship coming from France. She explains that he helped her with her sick father. She turns the court against Darnay because of comments he made supporting the American revolution, but also showed that he had kindness & compassion. • Dr. Manette is called to the stand, but has no recollection of having met Darnay due to his illness. • As Mr. Stryver is cross examining someone, Sydney Carton ( an assistant) approaches to give him a note. Carton looks strikingly like Darnay and the jury notices. • Their physical similarities put the question of reasonable doubt in the mind of the jurors. They return with the verdict: an acquittal.

  19. Characters in TOTCthrough Book #2 Chapter 7 • Jarvis Lorry • Jerry Cruncher • Lucie Manette • Ms. Pross • Mme. Defarge • Mr. Defarge • Dr. Manette • Jerry Cruncher Jr. • Mme. Cruncher • Charles Darnay • John Barsad • Mr. Stryver • Roger Cly • Sydney Carton • Monseigneur • Mr. Gaspard