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Learning Media Assessments. Orange County School District September 20, 2006. Agenda. 1:00 – 1:15 Introductions and Objectives 1:15 – 1:45 What IS a Learning Media Assessment? 1:45 – 2:00 Establishing the Impact the Visual Impairment has on Reading and Writing Skills

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learning media assessments

Learning Media Assessments

Orange County School District

September 20, 2006

agenda
Agenda

1:00 – 1:15 Introductions and Objectives

1:15 – 1:45 What IS a Learning Media Assessment?

1:45 – 2:00 Establishing the Impact the Visual Impairment has on Reading and Writing Skills

2:00 -2:10 Break

2:00 – 2:15 Identifying Sensory Channels

2:15 – 3:15 Determining the Appropriate Learning Media – Predominately Print? Predominately Braille? Or Both?

3:15 – 3:30 Review and Closure

our objectives for today
Our Objectives for Today

After given instruction and practice in Learning Media Assessments, teachers will conduct LMAs with their students to document appropriate learning medias with 100% accuracy.

1. Teachers will complete a sensory channels assessment with 80% accuracy.

2. Teachers will complete the decision- making scenarios with 80% accuracy.

thinking styles assessment

Thinking Styles Assessment

What’s Your Learning Style?

scoring9
Scoring:
  • Total the A’s from table I with the A’s from table II. Continue with B’s, C’s, and D’s
  • The category with the highest score is the one most like you.
scoring10
Scoring
  • A = Concrete Sequential
  • B = Abstract Sequential
  • C = Concrete Random
  • D = Abstract Random
what does it mean
What Does It Mean?

Random

Abstract

Concrete

Sequential

for discussion

For Discussion…….

Why do we do functional vision assessments?

importance of functional vision assessment
Importance of Functional Vision Assessment

“ The presence of a visual impairment affects every aspect of development and has a particularly profound effect on early relationships and communicative functions. Thus, the earlier the detection of a visual problem, the earlier the intervention can be implemented to offset many of the associated developmental problems that ensue as the result of visual dysfunction and to improve the general outlook for functional vision.” Beth Langley in ISAVE

proposal
Proposal….
  • Think of Learning Media Assessment in these terms:

1. Method to identify the impact a child’s visual impairment has on their ability to develop or maintain literacy skills.

proposal cont
Proposal Cont.

Learning Media Assessment:

2. Tool to help determine the current AND FUTURE media that will provide greatest access to learning for their student.

functional vision assessment
Functional Vision Assessment
  • Functional Vision – TOOL to discover what, how and where the student sees
  • WHY? “Information from observations should be summarized, analyzed and transformed into effective and unique intervention strategies.”

“Make an educated estimation of what, where, and how the student sees and the conditions that promote or impede visual functioning.” Beth Langley in ISAVE

learning media assessment
Learning Media Assessment
  • Functional Vision – TOOL to discover what, where and how that MEDIA should be used.
  • WHY? “Information from observations should be summarized, analyzed and transformed into effective and unique intervention strategies.”

“Make an educated estimation of what, where, and how the student LEARNS and the MEDIA that promotes or impedes LEARNING.” Kay Ratzlaff in Orange County

for discussion18

For Discussion….

What should be included in your functional vision assessments?

what are the non negotiable aspects of assessments

What are the non-negotiable aspects of assessments?

IDEIA, State Board Rule and District Requirements

eligibility assessments
Eligibility Assessments
  • Medical Eye Examination
  • Observation of Functional Vision to include daily living skills and mode of reading
  • Developmental or academic functioning
  • Additional – Orientation and Mobility and Vocational
re evaluation assessment
Re-evaluation Assessment
  • Re-evaluation shall occur at least every three years and shall include evaluations in accordance with paragraph (4) of this rule. (See previous slide.)
florida ese rules
Florida ESE Rules
  • In the case of a student who is blind or visually impaired, provision of instruction in braille and the use of braille unless the IEP team determines, after an evaluation of the student’s reading and writing skills, needs, including future needs, and appropriate reading and writing media, that instruction in braille or the use of braille is not appropriate for the student.
slide23

Requirements of Functional “Vision” Assessment

1. Eye Medical

2.Observation of

functional

vision

3. Developmental or

academic

functioning

4. Evaluation of

student’s reading

and writing skills

Daily living and

mode of reading

Future needs and

appropriate reading

and writing media.

5. Additional information -

Orientation and Mobility

Vocational

state board rule key points

State Board Rule -Key Points

Florida State Board Rule 6A-6.03014 Special Programs for Students Who Are Visually Impaired

state board rules
State Board Rules
  • Criteria for eligibility. A student is eligible for a special program for the visually impaired if the following medical andeducational criteria are met:
  • (a) Medical. There is a documented eye impairment as manifested by at least one of the following:
state board rules26
State Board Rules

1. A visual acuity of 20/70 or less in the better eye after best possible correction;

  • 2. A peripheral field so constricted that it affects the student's ability to function in an educational setting;
  • 3. A progressive loss of vision which may affect the student's ability to function in an academic setting or,
state board rules27
State Board Rules
  • 4. For children birth to five (5) years of age, bilateral lack of central, steady, or maintained fixation of vision with an estimated visual acuity of 20/70 or less after best possible correction; bilateral central scotoma involving the perimacula area (20/80-20/200); bilateral grade III, IV, or V Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP); or documented eye impairment as stated in paragraph (2)(a) of this rule.
state board rules28
State Board Rules

(b) Educational. There is a documented functional vision loss which:

1. Inhibits optimal processing of information through the visual channel; and

2. Requires the use of specialized techniques, textbooks, materials, or equipment.

state board rules29
State Board Rules

(4) Procedures for student evaluation

(a) The minimum evaluations necessary for determining eligibility shall include:

1. A medical eye examination describing: etiology, diagnosis, treatment regimen, prognosis, near/distance, corrected/uncorrected acuity measures for left eye, right eye and both eyes, measure of field of vision, and recommendations for lighting levels, physical activity, aids, or use of glasses, as appropriate. For children birth to five (5) years of age, a medical assessment describing visual functioning shall be documented when standard visual acuities and measure of field of vision are unattainable.

state board rules30
State Board Rules

2. Documented observation of functional vision to include daily living skills and mode of reading by a teacher of students with visual impairments or an appropriately trained diagnostician, and

state board rules31
State Board Rules

3. Evaluation of developmental or academic functioning.

(b) Additional information including vocational and orientation and mobility evaluations may be gathered to assist in determining the appropriate educational program and necessary environmental adjustments for the student.

continuum on assessments

Continuum on Assessments

Minimum… Maximum…

State Most

Board Effective Rule Practices

for discussion33
For Discussion…..
  • Are you meeting what the current research, the National Agenda, and Florida Low Vision Initiatives recommend in the realm of assessment? (Moving toward most effective practices on the continuum…..)
most effective practices

Most Effective Practices….

Learning Media Assessments by M. Cay Holbrook and Alan Koenig and A Practitioner’s Guide to Evaluation and Intervention by Amanda Hall Lueck

functional vision assessment fva learning media assessment lma
Functional Vision Assessment (FVA) Learning Media Assessment (LMA)
  • The learning media assessment is an objective process of systematically selecting learning and literacy media for students with visual impairments. This assessment process guides the educational team in making decisions on the range of instructional media needed to facilitate learning for students with visual impairments. The LMA, when used in a meaningful and holistic manner, will provide essential information needed to develop appropriate programs for all students, regardless of the level of vision or severity of additional disabilities.
components of lma
Components of LMA
  • Use of Sensory Channels
    • In different locations and under different conditions:
      • Record each observed behavior a child has with things in their environment
      • In each setting, record and rate 15 or more discrete behaviors
      • Put a box around the primary channel and a circle around the secondary channel
    • Most children will react with more than one sensory channel
    • If a consistent pattern does not emerge, differentiate observed behaviors involving near and distant tasks.
components of the learning media assessment
Components of the Learning Media Assessment
  • John’s Basic Reading Inventory
    • Regular print
    • Large print
    • Braille

Identifying the impact their visual impairment has on their reading and writing skills. And determining the appropriate learning media – predominantly regular print, predominantly large print, or predominantly braille.

components of assessment
Components of Assessment
  • Learning Media Assessment
    • Check reading speed (fluency) and comprehension in different sizes of print
    • Determine if there is a pattern of dropping ending of words or missing the beginning of words.
    • Loosing place while reading
    • Watch for consistent mistakes – e for o or c; v for u, etc.
learning media assessment39
Learning Media Assessment
  • Using the John’s Basic Reading Inventory provides concrete, objective data on the student’s reading skills and modes (regular print, large print or braille) for consideration by the IEP team.
fva lma
FVA -LMA
  • Continuing Assessment of Literacy Media
    • Materials used
      • Eye report
      • FVA
      • Reading inventory
    • Reading rates and comprehension
    • Recommended print sizes
    • Future needs
let s practice

Project SLATE: Supporting Literacy Achievement and Teacher Effectiveness for Students Who are Blind or Visually Impairedhttp://www.educ.ttu.edu/slate/

Let’s Practice…..

slide42

Jan

Project Slate Jan

slide43

Dave

Project Slate: Dave

important forms
Important Forms
  • General Student Information
  • Use of Sensory Channels
  • Indicators of Readiness for Conventional Literacy Program
  • Continuing Assessment of Literacy Media
  • Literacy Tools Inventory
functional vision assessments

Functional Vision Assessments

A Practitioner’s Guide to Evaluation and Intervention

Amanda Hall Lueck, Editor

key components of good functional vision assessment
Key Components of Good Functional Vision Assessment
  • Observations
  • Interviews
  • Assessments
  • Reports
  • Conveying Information in Person

A Practitioner’s Guide to Evaluation and Intervention, Amanda Hall Lueck, Editor

key components observations
Observations

Reading ability and efficiency

Use of pictures

Preferred viewing distance and positions

Writing tasks

Color identification

Lighting

Contrast

Mobility

Near object location and reach

Optical devices

Special equipment

Requests for assistance

Key Components -Observations

A Practitioner’s Guide to Evaluation and Intervention, Amanda Hall Lueck, Editor

key components interview
History

Favorite things – toys, activities, etc

Visual activities –

recognize people, computer, moving objects vs. still, etc.

Use of optical devices

Daily living activities

Mobility and transportation issues

Key Components -Interview

A Practitioner’s Guide to Evaluation and Intervention, Amanda Hall Lueck, Editor

key components assessment
Near Acuity

Distance Acuity

Crowding and spacing

Visual Fields

Contrast Sensitivity

Light Sensitivity

Color Vision

Oculomotor control

Reading Skills (Learning Media Assessment)

Visual Perceptual Skills

Daily Living Skills

Travel Skills

Computer Use

Key Components – Assessment

A Practitioner’s Guide to Evaluation and Intervention, Amanda Hall Lueck, Editor

components of assessment50
Components of Assessment
  • Near Acuity
    • Print size
    • Distance from reading materials
    • Different formats: Phone book, magazine, text book, newspaper, etc.
    • Contrast: Black on white, white on black, highlighted, etc.
    • Other suggestions?
components of assessment51
Components of Assessment
  • Distance Acuity
    • Distance from board
    • Different colored markers on board
    • Reading menus in fast food restaurant
    • Locating items in the environment
    • Reading street signs
    • TV or videos
    • Using Snellen charts or others
    • Other suggestions?
components of assessment52
Components of Assessment
  • Visual fields
  • Figure Ground
  • Familiar and unfamiliar environments
  • Different lighting conditions
  • Functional classroom tasks
  • Other suggestions?
components of assessment53
Components of Assessment
  • Contrast Sensitivity:
    • Colored markers?
    • Contrast sensitivity chart
  • Color Vision
  • Lighting Changes
    • Precision Vision Cone Adaptation
review some reports

Review some reports

Review the reports you have been given. Determine the strengths and weaknesses of each report based on the criteria discussed. Does the report meet or exceeded the minimum standards?

reports
Reports
  • Review the reports for the following:
    • Is there much jargon? Are terms clearly defined and explained?
    • Is the setting or environment clearly defined?
    • After reading the report would someone not familiar with “vision” understand the child’s visual limitations and condition?
reports56
Reports
  • Are key areas addressed? Learning Media Assessment, near acuity, far acuity, color, visual field, etc.
  • Are the recommendations appropriate and supported by data collection?
reflection
Reflection…..
  • Reflection….
  • Answer the following questions:
    • What was the most important thing I learned about the assessment process?
    • What will I change about my assessment process and reports?
    • What topics do I need additional information?
learning media assessment58

Learning Media Assessment

For students with visual impairments and additional disabilities.

preparing for assessment
Preparing for Assessment

Child should be:

  • Ready for perceiving and processing information
  • Provided with sufficient but appropriate amounts of information
  • Physically stabilized
preparing for assessment60
Preparing for Assessment
  • Ensuring Postural Stability
    • Consult with therapists for advice on postures and movements
    • Assisted supine head alignment affords mobility of the head and control of eye movement
    • Positions other than supine or sitting should be attempted
      • Side lying for dissociated movement, weight-bearing, organization of eyes and hands in midline
      • Prone for weight shift, facilitate reaching
preparation for assessment
Preparation for Assessment
  • Vestibular Activity
    • Vestibular System Information from our head position, the pull of gravity and speed and direction of movement. Guides our position in space, critical to staying upright.
    • Engaging in rolling or other forms of vestibular activity helps alert and integrate the oculomotor system
  • Proprioception
    • Proprioception – Information from muscle, tendons, and joints. Directs our posture and movement and detects force, amount, speed and positions in space.
behaviors suggesting vision
Behaviors Suggesting Vision
  • Turning to a light source
  • Eyes widening when presented with a visual stimulus
  • Increase or decrease in movement or postural tone
  • Change in breathing
  • Quieting or relaxation
conditions for optimal attending
Conditions for Optimal Attending
  • Low background light
  • Supine position with head raised
  • Stimuli presented slowly and calmly with time to process
conditions for optimal attending64
Conditions for Optimal Attending
  • Signs of stress include yawning, drowsiness, hiccupping, fussiness, eye aversion, regurgitation
  • Over stimulation and CVI
    • Fade in and out of responsiveness
    • Vision may disappear for seconds or longer
    • Assessment should be stopped
    • Use calming methods to facilitate reorganization
sensory channels
Sensory Channels
  • Appetite and Aversion charts
  • The parent, caregiver and teachers must be aware of alternate responses.
  • Identify the child’s motivational preferences
individual sensory learning profile interview

Individual Sensory Learning Profile Interview

Tanni Anthony, Ph.D.

Child Development Institute

http://www.fpg.unc.edu/~edin/Presentation_docs/AER%202006%20Resources/Literacy/Handouts/AM3_Handout_F_ISLPI.doc

challenges
Challenges
  • Determine a consistent response to a stimulus
  • Transfer that response to new situation
  • Attach meaning to that response
re visit our objectives for today
Re-Visit our Objectives for Today

After given instruction and practice in Learning Media Assessments, teachers will conduct LMAs with their students to document appropriate learning medias and channels with 100% accuracy.

1. Teachers will complete a sensory channels assessment with 80% accuracy.

2. Teachers will complete the decision- making scenarios with 80% accuracy.

contact info
Contact Info:

Kay Ratzlaff

4210 W. Bay Villa Ave, RM. 26

Tampa, FL 33611

813-837-7829 800-282-9193

kratzlaff@fimcvi.org www.fimcvi.org