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U.S. Assistance Programs for Export Control Development PowerPoint Presentation
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U.S. Assistance Programs for Export Control Development

U.S. Assistance Programs for Export Control Development

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U.S. Assistance Programs for Export Control Development

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  1. U.S. Assistance Programs for Export Control Development

  2. U.S. Assistance Overview • Department of State: • Export Control and Related Border Security Program (EXBS) • Biosecurity Engagement Program (BEP) • Chemical Security Engagement Program (CSP) • Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism (GICNT) • Department of Energy: • International Nonproliferation Export Control Program (INECP) • Second Line of Defense (SLD) Megaports Program

  3. The Export Control and Related Border Security (EXBS) Program United States Department of State Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation Office of Export Control Cooperation

  4. The EXBS Program Export Control and Related Border Security Created in the early 1990s to: • Assist foreign governments in bringing export control systems up to international standards; • Establish capabilities to detect, interdict, investigate, and prosecute illicit transfers of WMD, WMD-related materials, and conventional weapons; • Exchange information about export control and border security “best practices”; • Support national efforts to fulfill UNSCR 1540 requirements. EXBS Training along the borders of Afghanistan and Tajikistan.

  5. The EXBS Program Export Control and Related Border Security The EXBS Program: • Funded and managed by the U.S. Department of State • Has sponsored bilateral and regional cooperative efforts worth nearly $400 million including: • Over 1,472 technical exchanges and workshops • $216.5M of inspection and interdiction equipment • Regional Conferences and Seminars Interdiction Equipment Donation to Customs Officials

  6. EXBS is active in over 60 countries with 20 resident advisors around the world EXBS IS ACTIVE IN OVER 60 COUNTRIES WITH 20 RESIDENT ADVISORS AROUND THE WORLD

  7. The EXBS Program Export Control and Related Border Security The EXBS program is implemented by drawing on the expertise of international and non-governmental organizations, foreign governments, the private sector, and U.S. Government Agencies, including: • U.S. Department of Commerce • U.S. Department of Defense • U.S. Department of Energy • U.S. Department of Homeland Security • Customs and Border Protection (CBP) • Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) • U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) • U.S. Department of Justice

  8. The EXBS Program Export Control and Related Border Security EXBS works on establishing and strengthening “five pillars” of export control/border security: • Comprehensive Legal/Regulatory Frameworks • Effective Licensing Procedures and Practices • Enforcement Techniques and Equipment • Government Outreach to Industry • Interagency Coordination

  9. The EXBS Program Export Control and Related Border Security EXBS supports workshops and exchanges that facilitate drafting, adoption, and implementation of strong, comprehensive export control laws and regulations, including: • Basic Legal/Regulatory Workshop • Implementing Regulations Workshop • Model Law Workshop • Legislative Outreach Workshop

  10. The EXBS Program Export Control and Related Border Security Countries that have recently instituted new export control laws or regulations, or have strengthened existing laws and regulations include: • Philippines • Thailand • Vietnam • Mexico

  11. EXBS gives licensing officers the capacity to make well-informed decisions about which licenses to approve, through activities including: National Control List Workshop ASCOT (Analysis and Strategic Commodity Transfers) Brokering Workshop End/Use End/User Workshop (also relates to enforcement pillar) The EXBS Program Export Control and Related Border Security

  12. The following countries have adopted or are working to adopt national control lists: Singapore UAE Philippines Mexico The EXBS Program Export Control and Related Border Security

  13. Tracker Automated Export Control Licensing System: Deployed to 19 countries Tracker 7.0 to be released July 2009 www.trackernet.org The EXBS Program Export Control and Related Border Security

  14. EXBS works with Enforcement Agencies to: Modernize border crossing points, and Address basic and advanced customs and border enforcement techniques through: Commodity Identification Workshop and e-Commodity Identification (e-CIT) Techniques Land, Sea, Air, and Rail Interdiction Techniques Targeting and Risk Management Workshop Investigatory Techniques The EXBS Program Export Control and Related Border Security

  15. The EXBS Program Export Control and Related Border Security Nonintrusive Inspection Equipment Techniques International Air Cargo Interdiction Techniques

  16. EXBS has provided state-of- the-art imaging and advanced x-ray screening systems to countries to detect and interdict contraband: Backscatter vans Vehicle and Cargo Inspection Systems (VACIS) Pass-through x-ray systems The EXBS Program Export Control and Related Border Security

  17. EXBS provides advanced radiation detection and identification capabilities coupled with first-responders and incident response training: Installed or upgraded radiation portal monitors at key land crossings and sea ports in 8 countries Developed training courses with the VINCA Institute in Serbia on nuclear and chemical materials smuggling for customs and police officers in the region The EXBS Program Export Control and Related Border Security

  18. Success Stories: Several scrap metal shipments turned back at the borders by Serbian and Macedonian Customs due to excessive radiation levels (2007 & 2008) EXBS-provided Radiation Pagers alarmed, Customs officers stopped the shipments, isolated them and called in the experts Chemical shipment to Iran stopped by Macedonian Customs (June 2008) Manifest stated diesel fuel – viewed as suspicious Customs inspection determined truck contained a toxic chemical Customs isolated the vehicle, consulted with experts in Skopje and the U.S., then returned the shipment The EXBS Program Export Control and Related Border Security

  19. Success Stories: Kosovo Customs intercepted ammunition smuggling (July 2008) Stopped suspicious car at the border Questioned driver and observed that inside back walls had been modified Search turned up 17,000+ rounds of ammo hidden within the back walls The EXBS Program Export Control and Related Border Security

  20. Success Stories: Inspection and detection equipment and training has led to numerous interdictions and improved overall contraband seizure rates significantly. Serbian Customs officers employed EXBS-donated inspection equipment and techniques to stop and search a cargo truck, resulting in the seizure of over 160 kg of heroin. This was the largest drug seizure in the history of Serbian Customs. Macedonian Customs confiscated 882 pounds of cocaine using EXBS-provided x-ray vans. Valued at over 50 million Euros, the seizure was the largest in Macedonian history. The EXBS Program Export Control and Related Border Security

  21. Improving Control over Green Borders: The EXBS Program Export Control and Related Border Security • Provided equipment to develop mobile border teams in Eastern Europe and the Balkans • Deploying modular buildings along borders between crossing points in Central Asia. • Deployed border monitoring sensors in numerous partner countries • Delivered cargo scanning equipment, heavy-duty cranes, and forklifts to various Afghan border crossing points

  22. Government Industry Outreach: Government Industry Relations Forum Internal Compliance Program (ICP) Survey of Industries/Producers of Strategic and Dual Use Goods The EXBS Program Export Control and Related Border Security

  23. The EXBS Program Export Control and Related Border Security Export Control Resources Available Online Soon

  24. Tenth International Export Control Conference, June 2009, Turkey South Asia 1540 Workshop, June 2009, Sri Lanka Tracker Best Practices Conference, May 2009, Poland MANPADS Controls Seminar, April 2009, Morocco UN Regional 1540 Workshop, March 2009, Qatar OSCE Mediterranean Partners Seminar on MANPADS, October 2008, Vienna Ninth Annual International Export Control Conference, October 2008, Croatia OAS 1540 Workshop, May 2008, Argentina International Transshipment Conference, May, 2008, Morocco The EXBS Program Export Control and Related Border Security Recent EXBS program-sponsored multilateral events:

  25. The EXBS Program Export Control and Related Border Security Looking Towards the Future: • Promote sustainability, including through: • Development of customs academy curriculums and • Train-the-trainer training • International coordination on UNSCR 1540: • Work with other governments on third country outreach • Conduct/support UN-led regional 1540 workshops • Encourage regional cooperation • Strengthen interagency coordination

  26. Contact the EXBS Program: The EXBS Program Export Control and Related Border Security ECC Office Website: http://www.state.gov/t/isn/ecc/index.htm EXBS Program Website: http://www.exportcontrol.org

  27. Biosecurity Engagement Program (BSP) Why: Biological Threat Reduction Where: Global What: Awareness Raising Pathogen Security Safe, Secure, Sustainable S&T Development Enhance Disease Diagnosis & Surveillance How: Engage Scientists, Institutions, Policymakers Best Practices in Lab Biosafety & Biosecurity Technical & Grants Assistance to Partner Countries Bilateral and Multilateral Collaboration BEP FY2007 - 2009 FY09: $28 million worldwide ~ $6 million in ASEAN Region

  28. Biosecurity Engagement Program (BSP) BEP Engagement ONGOING: Indonesia Philippines Thailand Cambodia Laos Vietnam • Why Southeast Asia? • Transnational terrorist groups • Requested assistance at high containment laboratories • Extensive pathogen collections • Laboratory infrastructure variable • Growing lab biosafety & biosecurity awareness/expertise • Legal/regulatory biosafety/biosecurity framework incomplete • Human/animal health needs/infectious disease burden • HPAI, ND, Anthrax, FMD, Brucellosis, Rabies, Ebola-Reston, Nipah, dengue, malaria, MDR-TB, melioidiosis , Japanese encephalitis, enteric diseases

  29. Mission: The Chemical Security Engagement Program (CSP) seeks to deter terrorists and proliferant states from accessing chemical expertise and materials that could be used in a chemical attack. Program Goals: Raise awareness about chemical threat, dual-use nature of chemicals. Provide assistance to improve chemical security and safety best practices Foster national and regional dialogue on improving chemical safety and security Promote and strengthen scientific cooperation among chemical professionals Strategy: Work with partner countries to assess priorities and coordinate with: National chemistry societies Regional chemistry societies (Federation of Asian Chemistry Societies) International organizations (Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons) Chemical Security Engagement Program (CSP)

  30. Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism (GICNT) • Purpose: • Strengthen cooperation/collaboration among partner nations in building and exercising collective capabilities and resources in the overall global architecture to combat nuclear terrorism • Provide the opportunity for nations to share information and expertise in a non-legally binding environment • Bring together experience and expertise from the nonproliferation, counter proliferation, and counterterrorism disciplines and from international, federal, state, and local governments and private sector

  31. Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism (GICNT) • U.S. and Russia Co-Chair Responsibilities: • Set priorities for GICNT • 2008-09: strengthen detection and forensics, deny safe haven and financing to terrorists, deter terrorist intentions to acquire and use nuclear devices • Co-chair Plenary, Exercise Planning Group meetings • Coordinate Seminars, Workshops, Exercises via the Plan of Work • Assist in inviting partner nation SMEs to participate • Outreach to current 75 partners and prospective partners.

  32. International Nonproliferation Export Control Program (INECP) Department of Energy / National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE / NNSA)

  33. International Nonproliferation Export Control Program (INECP) • Threat • Networks of procurement agents, brokers, and companies systematically maneuver around and through national export control efforts to obtain commodities and technology needed for WMD development and production facilities • INECP Mission • Strengthen global efforts to prevent proliferation of WMD-related materials, equipment, and technology INECP’s approach is based on identifying, training, and developing a cadre of technical/nonproliferation specialists in each partner country that can sustain that country’s export control system over the long term

  34. Strengthen global efforts to prevent proliferation of WMD-related materials, equipment, and technology Proliferation Risk Analysis in the Licensing Process Ensure the license review process competently assesses proliferation risks associated with end-uses and end-users, and ensure technical specialists are being utilized Government Outreach and Enterprise Compliance Assist governments to establish outreach programs and promote enterprise compliance at key enterprises and technology holders WMD-related Commodity Identification Training and reach-back for Customs Ensure enforcement personnel are sensitized to WMD-related materials and equipment, and have access to technical/analytical resources and support International Nonproliferation Export Control Program (INECP) MISSION AREAS OF ENGAGEMENT

  35. International Nonproliferation Export Control Program (INECP)

  36. Three Pillars of INECP activity International Nonproliferation Export Control Program (INECP)

  37. International Nonproliferation Export Control Program (INECP) Spotlight on Enterprise Outreach • Our unique value added • Implementing compliance programs at US National Labs • Intangible technology control • Technical understanding of the control lists, commodities, WMD programs, acquisition networks • Our niche • Public sector, tertiary enterprises and legacy WMD sectors (nuclear, missile, chemical, biological)

  38. International Nonproliferation Export Control Program (INECP) Spotlight on Commodity Identification Training (CIT) • CIT gives inspectors “a trained eye” by familiarizing them with the materials, components, and equipment sought by WMD procurement programs • CIT simplifies export control lists by grouping items into technology “bundles” and by aiding recognition through a focus on physical appearance, using pictures and demonstration kits: • Equipment • Fabricated Parts and Components • Electronics (Components and Equipment) • Industrial Equipment • Systems and Subsystems • Materials • Structural Materials (metals and non-metals) • Special Materials (Nuclear, Chemical, Biological) • Indigenization strategy • INECP follows a disciplined indigenization approach based on our technical partnerships to establish ongoing training programs and reachback capabilities CIT deployment is underway in 25 countries

  39. U.S. Department of EnergySecond Line of Defense (SLD)Megaports Initiative

  40. Megaports Initiative (SLD) • Misson:To provide equipment, training, and technical support to international partners to enhance their ability to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking of special nuclear and other radioactive materials in the global maritime system. • Strategy: Engage high priority ports using a prioritization model that factors in threat (25%) and volume (75%) • Scan containers at high volume ports • Scan containers at high risk ports • Scan US-bound containers in conjunction with imaging operations to support DHS’ Container Security Initiative (CSI) and Secure Freight Initiative (SFI) • Goal: Screen as many containers as possible (including imports, exports, and transshipments) regardless of destination and with minimal impact to port operations

  41. Megaports Initiative (SLD) Project Scope • Equipment operated by host country personnel • Typical Activities funded by DOE/NNSA: • Radiation detection equipment and its installation • Cost share for additional ports • Associated cameras, Optical Character Recognition (OCR), License Plate Recognition (LPR) technology, and its installation, as appropriate • Computer equipment and associated communications systems for Central Alarm Systems • Installation of equipment at Regional or National training centers • Training in the use and maintenance of equipment • Technical support assistance • Maintenance and sustainability contracts Vehicle monitor with OCR Hand-held detection and identification equipment

  42. Megaports Initiative (SLD) Project Scope • Cost-Sharing approach pursued, where feasible • Host nation/private industry pays for design, construction, and installation, and in some cases, maintenance • Megaports provides equipment (including radiation detection equipment and communications hardware), software development, training, and in some cases, limited maintenance • Provide hands-on training and materials designed to address site-specific requirements • Develop training curriculum, operating procedures, and reference guides in host-country format/language • Establish indigenous training program tailored to existing capability • Promote a “Train-the-Trainer” approach Central Alarm Station (CAS) Materials Detected at Megaports installations to date include contaminated scrap and sealed radioactive sources

  43. Progress to Date Megaports Initiative (SLD) Bahamas (Freeport) Belgium (Antwerp) Belgium (Zeebrugge) Colombia (Cartagena) Dominican Republic (Caucedo) Greece (Piraeus) *Honduras (Cortes) – SFI Pilot Israel (Haifa) – Pilot Jamaica (Kingston Mexico (Lazaro Cardenas, Veracruz) Netherlands (Rotterdam) *Oman (Salalah) – SFI Pilot *Pakistan (Qasim) – SFI Pilot Panama (Balboa and MIT) Philippines (Manila) Spain (Algeciras) Singapore (Singapore) – Pilot *South Korea (Pusan) – SFI Pilot Sri Lanka (Colombo) Thailand (Laem Chabang) *U.K. (Southampton) – SFI Pilot Japan (Yokohama) Qatar (Training Center) Operational Megaports(23) Bangladesh (Chittagong) China (Shanghai) *China (Hong Kong) – SFI Djibouti (Djibouti) Dubai, UAE (Jebel Ali) Egypt (Alexandria) Israel (Ashdod) Jordan (Aqaba) Kenya (Mombasa) Lebanon (Beirut) Malaysia (Klang & TJP) Mexico ( Manzanillo, Altamira) Panama (Colon & Cristobal) Portugal (Lisbon) Spain (Valencia & Barcelona) Taiwan (Kaohsiung & Keelung) Implementation Phase(21) Special Projects & Collaboration (2) Over 25 other major international seaports in several locations are under negotiation *SFI Port Goal:Over 100 Megaports, scanning over 70% of global shipping traffic by 2015 and approximately 83% of U.S. bound imports shipped through these ports.

  44. Megaports Initiative (SLD) Summary • The Megaports Initiative enhances the ability to detect, interdict and deter illicit trafficking of special nuclear and other radioactive materials by providing equipment, training, and technical support to international partners • Radiation portal monitors, handheld identification equipment, a communication network and software allow partners to unobtrusively inspect cargo, as it transits through the port, for the presence and type of radiation • At the host country port, the Megaports Initiative implementation demonstrates that the system can be used effectively without a detrimental impact on commercial operations

  45. Thank You Yvette Wong Director, Office of Export Control Cooperation U.S. Department of State WongYM@state.gov