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Mastering MLA Style. Look at the Emily Lesk’s essay on page 106 of the St. Martin’s Handbook. Notice how the in-text citations directly link to the works cited entries ! The first word in the in-text citation will almost always be the same as the first word in the works cited entry.

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in text citations are married to works cited entries

Look at the Emily Lesk’s essay on page 106 of the St. Martin’s Handbook. Notice how the in-text citations directly link to the works cited entries! The first word in the in-text citation will almost always be the same as the first word in the works cited entry.

In-text citations are married to works cited entries! 
slide3

Throughout the company’s history, its marketing strategies have centered on putting Coca-Cola in scenes of the happy, carefree existence Americans are supposedly striving for. What 1950s teenage girl, for example, wouldn’t long to see herself in the Coca-Cola ad that appeared in a 1958 issue of Seventeen magazine? A clean-cut, handsome man flirts with a pair of smiling girls as they laugh and drink Cokes at a soda-shop counter. Even a girl who couldn’t picture herself in that idealized role could at least buy a Coke for consolation. The malt shop, complete with a soda jerk in a white jacket and paper hat and a Coca-Cola fountain, is a theme that, even today, remains a piece of Americana (Ikuta 74).

This WHOLE paragraph discusses info from page 74 of Mr. Ikuta’s book. So, the author waits until the end of the paragraph to cite the source.

slide4

Throughout the company’s history, its marketing strategies have centered on putting Coca-Cola in scenes of the happy, carefree existence Americans are supposedly striving for. What 1950s teenage girl, for example, wouldn’t long to see herself in the Coca-Cola ad that appeared in a 1958 issue of Seventeen magazine? (Ikuta 74). A clean-cut, handsome man flirts with a pair of smiling girls as they laugh and drink Cokes at a soda-shop counter. Even a girl who couldn’t picture herself in that idealized role could at least buy a Coke for consolation. The malt shop, complete with a soda jerk in a white jacket and paper hat and a Coca-Cola fountain, is a theme that, even today, remains a piece of Americana (Ikuta 75).

This paragraph discusses info from two different pages of Mr. Ikuta’s book. So, I placed an in-text citation immediately after the info that was borrowed from each page.

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One of the earliest and best-known examples of this strategy is artist Haddon Sundblom’s rendering of Santa Claus (see Fig. 2). Using the description of Santa in Clement Moore’s poem “A Visit from St. Nicholas”—and his own rosy-cheeked face as a model—Sundblom contributed to the round, jolly image of this American icon, who just happens to delight in an ice-cole Coke after a tiring night of delivering presents (“Haddon Sundblom & Santa Claus”). Coca-Cola utilized the concept of the magazine to present this inviting image in a brilliant manipulation of the medium (Pendergrast 181).

This paragraph discusses info from two different sources. So, the writer placed an in-text citation immediately after the info that was borrowed from each source.

slide6

One of the earliest and best-known examples of this strategy is artist Haddon Sundblom’s rendering of Santa Claus (see Fig. 2). Using the description of Santa in Clement Moore’s poem “A Visit from St. Nicholas”—and his own rosy-cheeked face as a model—Sundblom contributed to the round, jolly image of this American icon, who just happens to delight in an ice-cole Coke after a tiring night of delivering presents (“Haddon

Sundblom & Santa Claus”).

This excerpt discusses info from a web site. Since there is no author or page number, the citation includes the name of the web site.
here is how to cite an entire website

On the works cited page:

Cooper, Phil. Diet and Exercise. Health Institute, 28 Apr. 2003. Web. 10 May 2009.

  • Within the essay: Just ten minutes of exercise five days per week can decrease cholesterol levels by 10% (Cooper).
Here is how to cite an entire website.
here is how to cite an individual page on a web site

On the works cited page:

“Eating Well for Less.” Fab Foods. 24 June 2009. Web. 20 April 2010.

Within the essay:

A nutritious home-cooked meal may be prepared for under $1 per serving (“Eating Well”).

Here is how to cite an individual page on a web site.