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Approaches to Plagiarism. Approaches to Plagiarism. Individual. Approaches to Plagiarism. Education. Individual. Sonoma State University http://www.sonoma.edu/uaffairs/policies/cheatingpolicy.htm. Texas A&M University http://writingcenter.tamu.edu/content/view/12/54/.

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Presentation Transcript
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Approaches

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Plagiarism

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Approaches

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Plagiarism

Individual

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Approaches

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Education

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sonoma state university http www sonoma edu uaffairs policies cheatingpolicy htm
Sonoma State Universityhttp://www.sonoma.edu/uaffairs/policies/cheatingpolicy.htm
texas a m university http writingcenter tamu edu content view 12 54
Texas A&M Universityhttp://writingcenter.tamu.edu/content/view/12/54/
the council of writing program administrators http wpacouncil org node 9
The Council of Writing Program Administrators http://wpacouncil.org/node/9

Students should understand research assignments as opportunities for genuine and rigorous inquiry and learning. Such an understanding involves:

• Assembling and analyzing a set of sources that they have themselves determined are relevant to the issues they are investigating;

• Acknowledging clearly when and how they are drawing on the ideas or phrasings of others;

• Learning the conventions for citing documents and acknowledging sources appropriate to the field they are studying;

• Consulting their instructors when they are unsure about how to acknowledge the contributions of others to their thought and writing.

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Hodges, John C., with Mary E. Whitten, in consultation with Francis X. Connolly. Harbrace College Handbook. 5th ed. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World, 1962. 409-410.

  • Plagiarism. Any failure to acknowledge borrowed material is a serious offense called plagiarism. If a borrowed idea is expressed in the student's phraseology, an acknowledgment of the source is sufficient. If it is in the phraseology of the source, it should be put in quotation marks and also acknowledged. Usually any conscious quotation (except well-known or proverbial passages) of three or four connected words or more should be placed in quotation marks. In a library paper, acknowledgments are made in footnotes.
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Approaches

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Approaches

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InstitutionalReform

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Approaches

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the center for academic integrity http www academicintegrity org
The Center for Academic Integrityhttp://www.academicintegrity.org/
the council of writing program administrators http www wpacouncil org node 9

The Council of Writing Program Administrators http://www.wpacouncil.org/node/9

Most current discussions of plagiarism fail to distinguish between:

submitting someone else’s text as one’s own or attempting to blur the line between one’s own ideas or words and those borrowed from another source, and

carelessly or inadequately citing ideas and words borrowed from another source.

Such discussions conflate plagiarism with the misuse of sources.

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turnitin com http www turnitin com
Turnitin.com http://www.turnitin.com

“Every paper submitted to Turnitin is compared against the most comprehensive digital repository of potentially plagiarizable material in the world.”

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Approaches

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Approaches

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Criticalreading

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the council of writing program administrators http wpacouncil org node 920
The Council of Writing Program Administrators http://wpacouncil.org/node/9
  • Show students how to evaluate their sources. Provide opportunities for students to discuss the quality of the content and context of their sources, through class discussions, electronic course management programs or Internet chat spaces, or reflective assignments. Discuss with students how their sources will enable them to support their argument or document their research.
  • Focus on reading. Successful reading is as important to thoughtful research essays as is successful writing. Develop reading-related heuristics and activities that will help students to read carefully and to think about how or whether to use that reading in their research projects.
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Pedagogy

the council of writing program administrators http wpacouncil org node 922
The Council of Writing Program Administrators http://wpacouncil.org/node/9
  • Design assignments that require students to explore a subject in depth.
  • Start building possible topics early.
  • Consider establishing a course theme, and then allow students to define specific questions about that theme so that they become engaged in learning new ideas and begin to own their research.
  • Develop schedules for students that both allow them time to explore and support them as they work toward defined topics.
  • Support each step of the research process.
  • Make the research process, and technology used for it, visible.
  • Attend to conventions of different genres of writing.
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Criticalreading

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InstitutionalReform

Pedagogy

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Criticalreading

Approaches

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InstitutionalReform

Pedagogy