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Silver Strong and Associates. Thoughtful Education Press. The. Thoughtful Classroom. Making Students as Important as Standards. What does it mean when we say “Reading” for meaning?. focus, purpose. focus, purpose. Four Thoughts-Four Readings. What do good readers do when they

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Presentation Transcript
slide1

Silver Strong and Associates

Thoughtful Education Press

The

Thoughtful Classroom

Making Students as Important as Standards

slide3

focus, purpose

focus, purpose

four thoughts four readings
Four Thoughts-Four Readings

What do good readers do when they

read?

principles of success
Principles of Success
  • Principle of Accessing Prior Knowledge
  • Principle of Active Reading
  • Principle of Accountability
  • Principle of Communication Connection
levels of comprehension
Levels of Comprehension

Textually Explicit or Literal

Requires the reader to find or recall directly stated information.

Schema Based

Judgmental

Make judgment about the reading based on prior knowledge, perceptions, experiences, and values.

Implicit or Interpretive

Requires the reader to translate or determine what the implications of what has been read.

Critical Reading

Problem solve, explore connections or apply the information read to topics external to the reading or focus on the aesthetics, symbols, or imagery .

reading for meaning lesson
Reading for Meaning Lesson

Cold Mountain

Cold Mountain

Reading for Meaning

a word is a sign that signifies meaning

A word is a sign that signifies meaning…

What are some words that are synonymous with smart?

What are some words that mean the opposite of smart?

What do these words signify?

think about the following statements before reading the text
Think about the following statements before reading the text:

Agree Disagree

_____ _____ 1. Intelligent people are not always

smart.

______ ______ 2. People can be both illiterate and smart.

______ _______ 3. Life is a rich textbook filled with lessons.

______ _______ 4. A good way to learn is to ask questions.

reading for meaning

Agree Disagree

Intelligent people are not always smart.

Evidence to Refute

Evidence to Support

Reading for Meaning

Agree Disagree

People can be both illiterate and smart.

Evidence to Refute

Evidence to Support

reading for meaning16

Agree Disagree

Life is a rich textbook filled with lessons.

Evidence to Refute

Evidence to Support

Reading for Meaning

Agree Disagree

A good way to learn is to ask questions.

Evidence to Refute

Evidence to Support

assessment
Assessment

Open Response

Ruby, who had little formal education, was Ada’s primary text.

A. Give THREE examples of how Ruby served as a ‘text’ to Ada.

B. Explain the importance of Ruby’s lessons and how they helped Ada to survive.

reflective writing
Reflective Writing

On Demand Writing

Think about a person in your life who, like Ruby, serves as a primary text to your own learning. What some important lessons they have taught you? Why are these lessons important to your own wellness and personal growth?

Write a letter of thanks letting him/her know how much you appreciate them

reading for meaning19
Reading for Meaning
  • Text to Text: Planning Inside the Text
  • Text to World: Planning Outside the Text
variation to reading for meaning
Variation to Reading for Meaning

Inside the Text Outside the Text

Gettysburg Address Gettysburg Address

  • The two fundamental ideals 1. Liberty is more important

of U.S. government are than equality.

liberty and equality.

  • Lincoln believed the soldiers 2. In a Democracy, soldiers

died in vain. never die in vain.

variation to reading for meaning21
Variation to Reading for Meaning

Inside the Text Outside the Text

Gettysburg Address Gettysburg Address

  • Lincoln believes the past 3. The present is not

controls the present. controlled by the past.

  • A good slogan for the speech 4. Words can heal a

Lincoln gave at Gettysburg a nation.

should be “We can work it out.”

slide22

What is the difference between designing statements inside the text and outside the text?When would you want to use statements inside the text?When would you want to use statements outside the text?

slide27

Reading for Meaning

Agree Disagree

1. This animal lives entirely in the water.

2. It plays an important role in its

habitat.

3. These creatures are powerful predators.

4. It is uniquely designed to adapt to its

habitat.

open response
Open Response

Science Standard 5B12: Explain how organisms are adapted to environmental conditions in different biomes. (LIB2)

Study the picture of the imaginary animal below. Based on its features, make scientific inferences about the animals habitat and about its niche. In other words, tell about the kind of area it might live in, what it might eat, and what role it might play in its community. Be sure to explain your reasoning.

slide29
Read and analyze the question.

Establish a gist answer or main idea.

Search for evidence in the text to support your main idea.

Prove your case, analyze reasons or ask “why?”

Organize the details chronologically or by importance using transition words

Now, write a conclusion, a personal, historical, or textual connection.

Did you answer all parts….

….. stay on the topic

.......use appropriate writing connections

.............write clearly and neatly?

slide30

Read and analyze the question.

Establish a gist answer or main idea.

Science Standard 5B12: Explain how organisms are adapted to environmental conditions in different biomes. (LIB2)Study the picture of the imaginary animal below. Based on its features, make scientific inferences about the animals habitat and about its niche. In other words, tell about the kind of area it might live in, what it might eat, and what role it might play in its community. Be sure to explain your reasoning.

What are you trying to prove?

What is the gist or main idea?

slide31

Search for evidence to support.

Prove your case, ask “why?”

This creature is designed so that it can adapt and survive living in wet, marshy environments.

Large ears helps it to hear predators

What evidence?

Analyze why?

Webbed Feet

Allows it to move in and out of the water

Eyes on side of head helps it to see predators and prey

Long sticky tongue for catching insects

Why?

Why?

Why?

Long hind legs for jumping

Why?

Why?

slide32
Read and analyze the question.

Establish a gist answer or main idea.

Search for evidence in the text to support your main idea.

Prove your case, analyze reasons or ask “why?”

Organize the details chronologically or by importance using transition words

Now, write a conclusion, a personal, historical, or textual connection.

Did you answer all parts….

….. stay on topic

.......use appropriate writing conventions

.............write clearly and neatly?

slide33

Think of a Time ….

when you have been competitive. What did it feel like? List the advantages and disadvantages of competition.

Advantages Disadvantages

slide34

Now, think about situations where you worked together with other people to achieve a team goal.

List some of the advantages and disadvantages of cooperating.

Advantages Disadvantages

slide35

What are some characteristics a strategy would have to possess in order to combine the assets of both competition and cooperation while minimizing the liabilities?

team game tournaments
TEAM GAME TOURNAMENTS
  • How can you create a strategy that maximizes the benefits of competition and cooperation and minimizes students’ inabilities?
slide37

Goals of Team Games Tournament

  • To provide immediate and positive effect on student academic success.
  • To produce positive changes in students’ attitudes toward the class and content matter.
  • To foster positive working relationships among students by creating an interdependency.
  • To make it possible for students with different learning rates to have an equal opportunity to succeed at an academic task and/or learning goal.
  • To help students learn HOW to LEARN.
g a m e s
GAMES

enerate short answer objective questions and answer sheet for practice session and Tournament play.

rrange students into academically balanced practice teams.

ix team members by comparable ability for tournament play.

xplain tournament roles of doer, checker, and challenger.

ecure score and team summary sheets to validate results.

phase i practice session
Phase I: Practice Session

Teammates work together to practice and help each other get ready to participate in the weekly tournament.

What are the learning goals?

What are the expectations?

How will teams work together to learn the content material?

phase ii weekly tournament games
Phase II: Weekly Tournament Games

Each student plays against members from other teams, points won for first, second, third, fourth place are given.

Groups can play as long as time permits. If they finish the first game, they simple reshuffle cards and begin again.

scoring points
Scoring Points

Player No Ties Tie for Top Tie for Low 3 way Tie

Top Score 6 5 6 4

Middle Score 4 5 3 4

Low Score 2 2 3 4

Three Player Game

group assignment

Based on past performance, top scoring students begin at table 1.

Based on past performance, low scoring students begin at table 8.

Group Assignment

Table 1 Table 2 Table 3 Table 4

Table 5 Table 6 Table 7 Table 8

bumping
Bumping

Table 1 Table 2 Table 3 Table 4

Student compete in Team Games.

After the first tournament game, students change tables based on their tournament performance.

High performing student at Table 2 for example would move to Table 1. Low performing student at Table 2 would be bumped to Table 3. The second high scorer would remain at Table 2.

phase iii formative evaluation
Phase III: Formative Evaluation

Data gathering of evidence of changed students’ attitudes toward the class and subject matter.

Data gathering of evidence in the working relationship of students.

Data gathering of evidence of improved and positive effects upon student academic performance.

slide45

100%

90%

80%

70%

60%

50%

30%

20%

Average

Test Scores

Using TGT

Without TGT

Closing the Achievement Gap

9th Grades Social Studies

P. Dugan

Top Achievers Average Achievers At Risk

slide46

Type 2 Questions are posed as a riddle.

Type 1 Questions require students to construct an answer.

Tournament Questions

Type 6 Questions are mathematical in nature and have one correct answer.

Type 3 Questions ask if it is true or not.

Type 4 Questions have one correct answer and may be posed as a multiple choice.

Type 5 Questions have multiple correct answers.

slide47

Planning Team Games

  • Prepare short answer objective questions and answer sheets for practice session and tournament play.
  • Assign students to practice teams of three or four members, balance teams academically.
  • Assign one member from each team to participate at a tournament table, there should not be more than four per table with equal ability.
  • Explain the role of player, challenger, and checker. Review the rules.
  • Collect game score and team summary sheets, validate results and prepare a method for announcing and recognizing teams.