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MLA Format. Take One: Print Sources. Books with One Author or Editor. Last Name of Author, First Name. (follow with ‘, ed. if the person is an editor). Title . City of Publication: Publication Company, Date of Pub. Print. Examples:

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mla format

MLA Format

Take One: Print Sources

books with one author or editor
Books with One Author or Editor

Last Name of Author, First Name. (follow with ‘, ed. if the person is an editor). Title. City of Publication: Publication Company, Date of Pub. Print.

Examples:

Twitchell, James B. Living it Up: America’s Love Affair with Luxury. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2002. Print.

Crystal, David. Language Play. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1998. Print.

books with two or more authors
Books with Two or More Authors

Always list the authors in the order they are listed on the text. If there are four or more authors, you can use the abbreviation ‘et al’ after the first author’s name.

Last Name, First Name, Full Name, and Full Name. Title. City: Pub. Company, Date. Print.

Examples:

Cohn, Rachel, and David Levithan. Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist. New York: Random House, 2007. Print.

Lupton, Ellen, et al. A Fake Book. New York: Fake Publishing, 2007. Print.

a work in an anthology
A Work in an Anthology

Last Name, First Name. “Title of Story.” Name of Anthology. Ed. Full Name. City: Pub. Company, Date: page no. Print.

Example:

Cofer, Judith Ortiz. “American History.” Literature and the Language Arts: The American Tradition. Ed. Laurie Skiba. St. Paul: EMC/Paradigm, 2002: 31-38. Print.

republished book modern printing of an older text
Republished Book (modern printing of an older text)

Last Name, First Name. Name of Book. Original publication date. City: Pub. Company, Date of current publication. Print.

Example:

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. 1925. New York: Random House, 2001. Print.

a book published in a second or subsequent edition
A Book Published in a Second or Subsequent Edition

Last Name, First Name. Title. Edition Number. City: Pub. Company, Year. Print.

Example:

Arnett, Jeffrey Jensen. Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood: A Cultural Approach. 2nd ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc., 2004. Print.

preface foreword introduction or afterword
Preface, Foreword, Introduction, or Afterword

Last Name, First Name. Description of contribution. Name of Book. (follow with ‘By’ or ‘Ed.’ and the name of the book’s author or title). Original publication date, if republished. City: Pub. Company, Date of current publication, if applicable. Print.

Example:

Bruccolli, Matthew J. Introduction. The Great Gatsby. By F. Scott Fitzgerald. 1925. New York: Random House, 2001. Print. vi-xiv.

Atwan, Robert. Foreword. The Best American Essays 2002. Ed. Stephen Jay Gould. Boston: Houghton, 2002. Print. viii-xii.

an article in a reference book
An Article in a Reference Book

Typical Entry:

“Name of Entry.” Title of Reference Book. Edition No. Year of Publication. Print.

No Author Attached Example:

“Specificity.” The New Lexicon Webster’s Dictionary of the English Language. 1991 ed. 1990. Print.

Author Attached Example:

Allen, Anita L. “Privacy in Health Care.” Encyclopedia of Bioethics. Ed. Stephen G. Post. 3rd ed. Vol. 4. New York: Macmillan-Thomson, 2004. Print.

sacred text
Sacred Text

Unless you are citing a particular edition, sacred texts do not need to appear in the works cited list.

Example:

The New Jerusalem Bible. Henry Wansbrough, ed. New York: Doubleday, 1985. Print.

newspaper article
Newspaper Article

Last Name, First Name. “Article Title.” Name of Newspaper Day Month Year of Publication, edition (if applicable, as in late ed., early ed.): page. Print.

Example:

Tysiac, Ken. “Wolfpack Adds One to Roster.” News and Observer 14 August 2009, late ed.: C1+. Print.

magazine article
Magazine Article

Last Name, First Name. “Name of Article.” Magazine Title Date of Publication: Page Number(s). Print.

Example:

Zakaria, Fareed. “Victory in Iraq.” Newsweek 15 June 2009: 32-35. Print.

an article in a scholarly journal
An Article in a Scholarly Journal

Last Name, First Name. “Title of Article.” Title of Publication Vol.Iss No (Month and Year, or just Year): Page No(s). Print.

Example:

Quinn, Anna. “Reading between the Lines: Strategies to Discover Meaning from a Text.” English Journal 95.1 (Sept. 2005): 47-51. Print.

a print source without an author
A Print Source Without an Author

If there is not an author, skip it and go on to the title. The rest of the entry would look the same as the regular entry for that type of source:

Example:

“Whose Bright Idea Was This?” Newsweek 15 June 2009: 68. Print.

what to do if your source doesn t match up perfectly with a model
What to do if Your Source Doesn’t Match up Perfectly with a Model??

Don’t panic! Just use some good old common sense:

  • Identify a basic model to follow.
  • Look for models that show the additional elements in your source.
  • Add new elements from the other models to your basic model in the order indicated.
  • When in doubt, ask your teacher for help.
general reminders
General Reminders
  • You can also underlineTitles instead of italicizing them.
  • You must always indent any lines after the first one.
  • Always put periods inside quotation marks.
  • With articles that are not on continuous pages, put a plus after the first page (ex. C8+) to show that it continues (but not on C9).
  • With Print sources, you must now include the word Print at the end of the entry (in the case of series, it comes before the series title). This is a change from previous years!
  • Sometimes you may have to do a little searching to find all the information for an entry. Just because you don’t see it in one quick second, doesn’t mean it isn’t there!