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Writing a Curriculum Vitae & Converting your C.V. to a Resume . Presenter: Beth White, Associate Director The Career Center, Emory University 1784 N. Decatur Rd., Suite 200 404-727-6211 www.career.emory.edu. What goes in a C.V.? .

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Writing a Curriculum Vitae & Converting your C.V. to a Resume


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    1. Writing a Curriculum Vitae & Converting your C.V. to a Resume Presenter: Beth White, Associate Director The Career Center, Emory University 1784 N. Decatur Rd., Suite 200 404-727-6211 www.career.emory.edu

    2. What goes in a C.V.? • A written summary of your educational and professional experience. • A thorough list of all of your academic achievements • See hand-out: “Possible categories to include in a Vita” • Content can vary from discipline to discipline. Seek feedback from others in your field and from your advisor.

    3. When is a CV used? • Applications for academic or research positions • Departmental or tenure Reviews • Leadership positions for professional associations • Speaking Engagements • Publishing • Editorial Review Boards • Consulting • Grant Proposals • Fellowships

    4. Getting Started: Content • On the first draft of your CV, list everything that could possibly be included: Postdoc experience, research and teaching experience, publications, academic service, grants, etc. (You can always go back & delete less significant information.) • Look at sample CV’s, such as the one we provided. • Look at the Chronicle of Higher Education’s job web page http:chronicle.com/jobs to find sample CVs and additional information about writing job search materials.

    5. How to Organize Your C.V. • Organize each section in reverse chronological order • Put most important information the first page • Use clear, easy to understand language • Tailor your C.V. to your audience

    6. Content of the C.V. • Contact information goes at the top. • List only phone numbers where you want to be contacted • Use one email address (more than one may confuse the employer)

    7. Educational Background • Educational background comes next • Most Ph.D.s put this at the top • Field of concentration, name of dissertation, name of your advisor • Some Post docs have “Current Research Experience” as a first category, before education • Include your undergraduate degree

    8. Experience • Many use 2 sections • “Research Experience” • “Teaching Experience” • For those with significant professional experience outside the academy, “Professional Experience” is a section you may include.

    9. Additional sections of the C.V. • Many more possible categories exist • On the “Job Candidate” CV sample we gave you, let’s take a look at some of the sections you see listed after the “Teaching Experience” section: • Informal Teaching Activities • Fellowships and Awards or Honors and Awards • Additional Activities and Honors • Refereed Publications • Invited Reviews • Selected Abstracts (National and International Meetings) • Selected Seminars • References

    10. Additional possible categories: • Research Interests • Be completely prepared to elaborate on this if you get an interview • Must be credible • A brief answer to the question, “What is next?” • Teaching Competencies (or) Teaching Interests • CV should support and justify what you write • Must be credible

    11. A Resume Is… Used outside of academia and research-oriented positions (i.e. business, non-profit, etc.) Typically 1 page in length, 2 pages maximum Targeted to the specific position, employer, and/or industry

    12. Targeting Your Resume A resume is a living, breathing document. It should adjust to the position for which it is used. DO NOT use one standard resume to apply to unrelated positions. Target your text through proper selection and description of experiences.

    13. Sections To Include Contact Information Objective (optional) Skills Summary Education Experience Additional/ Optional Categories

    14. Sample Position – Corporate Trainer / Curriculum Developer Facilitate training sessions Develop and write new curriculum Proficient in technology applications Assess & evaluate program effectiveness and learning outcomes

    15. Sample Position – Skills Needed Teaching skills Presentation skills Writing skills Research skills

    16. Do’s and Don’ts of Resumes Do tailor the resume to the given position. Do choose language that reflects the industry. Do treat your resume as a sales brochure. Don’t list false information. Don’t write in paragraph form. Use bullets. Don’t list irrelevant information.

    17. The Career Center • North Decatur Building, Suite 200 • 404-727-6211 • 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. • Services offered: - Critique service - Career counseling - Send documents to: careercenter@emory.edufor a critique.