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Wilsonian Progressivism at Home and Abroad, 1912–1916

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  1. Chapter 29 Wilsonian Progressivism at Home and Abroad, 1912–1916

  2. Question All of the following are true of New Freedom EXCEPT • it included stronger antitrust legislation to protect small business enterprises from monopolies, banking reform, and tariff reductions. • it advocated decreasing opportunities for capitalist competition rather than increasing government regulation of large trusts. • it shunned social-welfare proposals and pinned their economic faith on competition. • the keynote of Wilson’s campaign was not regulation but fragmentation of the big industrial combines, chiefly by means of vigorous enforcement of the antitrust laws.

  3. Answer All of the following are true of New Freedom EXCEPT • it included stronger antitrust legislation to protect small business enterprises from monopolies, banking reform, and tariff reductions. • it advocated decreasing opportunities for capitalist competition rather than increasing government regulation of large trusts. (correct) • it shunned social-welfare proposals and pinned their economic faith on competition. • the keynote of Wilson’s campaign was not regulation but fragmentation of the big industrial combines, chiefly by means of vigorous enforcement of the antitrust laws. Hint: See pages 729–730.

  4. Question All of the following were true of the New Nationalism EXCEPT • it was the state-interventionist reform program advocated by Theodore Roosevelt during his Bull Moose presidential campaign. • Roosevelt objected to continued consolidation of trusts and labor unions. • it sought to create stronger regulatory agencies to insure that they operated to serve the public interest. • it favored continued consolidation of trusts and labor unions, paralleled by the growth of powerful regulatory agencies.

  5. Answer All of the following were true of the New Nationalism EXCEPT • it was the state-interventionist reform program advocated by Theodore Roosevelt during his Bull Moose presidential campaign. • Roosevelt objected to continued consolidation of trusts and labor unions. (correct) • it sought to create stronger regulatory agencies to insure that they operated to serve the public interest. • it favored continued consolidation of trusts and labor unions, paralleled by the growth of powerful regulatory agencies. Hint: See page 729.

  6. Question All of the following were true the Underwood Tariff EXCEPT • it provided for a substantial increase of rates. • a swarm of lobbyists descended on the Senate seeking to disembowel the bill. • Wilson promptly issued a combative message to the people, urging them to hold their elected representatives in line. • Congress enacted a graduated income tax, beginning with a modest levy on incomes over $3,000.

  7. Answer All of the following were true the Underwood Tariff EXCEPT • it provided for a substantial increase of rates. (correct) • a swarm of lobbyists descended on the Senate seeking to disembowel the bill. • Wilson promptly issued a combative message to the people, urging them to hold their elected representatives in line. • Congress enacted a graduated income tax, beginning with a modest levy on incomes over $3,000. Hint: See page 732.

  8. Question All of the following were true of the Federal Reserve Act EXCEPT • it was the most important piece of economic legislation between the Civil War and the New Deal. • the new Federal Reserve Board oversaw a nationwide system of twelve regional reserve districts, each with its own central bank. • it created a public bank, but the final authority of the Federal Reserve Board guaranteed substantial bankers’ control. • its board was also empowered to issue paper money backed by commercial paper, such as promissory notes of businesspeople.

  9. Answer All of the following were true of the Federal Reserve Act EXCEPT • it was the most important piece of economic legislation between the Civil War and the New Deal. • the new Federal Reserve Board oversaw a nationwide system of twelve regional reserve districts, each with its own central bank. • it created a public bank, but the final authority of the Federal Reserve Board guaranteed substantial bankers’ control. (correct) • its board was also empowered to issue paper money backed by commercial paper, such as promissory notes of businesspeople. Hint: See page 733.

  10. Question All of the following were true of the Federal Trade Commission Act EXCEPT • it was part of Wilson’s attempt to attack the “triple wall of privilege.” • it empowered a presidentially appointed commission to turn a searchlight on industries engaged in interstate commerce. • the commissioners were expected to crush monopoly at the source by rooting out unfair trade practices. • the law exempted certain practices, including unlawful competition, false advertising, mislabeling, adulteration, and bribery.

  11. Answer All of the following were true of the Federal Trade Commission Act EXCEPT • it was part of Wilson’s attempt to attack the “triple wall of privilege.” • it empowered a presidentially appointed commission to turn a searchlight on industries engaged in interstate commerce. • the commissioners were expected to crush monopoly at the source by rooting out unfair trade practices. • the law exempted certain practices, including unlawful competition, false advertising, mislabeling, adulteration, and bribery. (correct) Hint: See page 733.

  12. Question The Clayton Anti-Trust Act did all of the following EXCEPT it • lengthened the shopworn Sherman Act’s list of business practices that were deemed objectionable. • failed to prohibit price discrimination and interlocking directorates. • conferred long-overdue benefits on labor. • exempted labor and agricultural organizations from antitrust prosecution, while explicitly legalizing strikes and peaceful picketing.

  13. Answer The Clayton Anti-Trust Act did all of the following EXCEPT it • lengthened the shopworn Sherman Act’s list of business practices that were deemed objectionable. • failed to prohibit price discrimination and interlocking directorates. (correct) • conferred long-overdue benefits on labor. • exempted labor and agricultural organizations from antitrust prosecution, while explicitly legalizing strikes and peaceful picketing. Hint: See pages 733–734.

  14. Question The Workingmen’s Compensation Act • required decent treatment and a living wage on American merchant ships. • granted assistance to federal civil-service employees during periods of disability. • restricted child labor on products flowing into interstate commerce. • established an eight-hour day for all employees on trains in interstate commerce.

  15. Answer The Workingmen’s Compensation Act • required decent treatment and a living wage on American merchant ships. • granted assistance to federal civil-service employees during periods of disability. (correct) • restricted child labor on products flowing into interstate commerce. • established an eight-hour day for all employees on trains in interstate commerce. Hint: See page 734.

  16. Question The Adamson Act of 1916 • required decent treatment and a living wage on American merchant ships. • granted assistance to federal civil-service employees during periods of disability. • restricted child labor on products flowing into interstate commerce. • established an eight-hour day for all employees on trains in interstate commerce.

  17. Answer The Adamson Act of 1916 • required decent treatment and a living wage on American merchant ships. • granted assistance to federal civil-service employees during periods of disability. • restricted child labor on products flowing into interstate commerce. • established an eight-hour day for all employees on trains in interstate commerce. (correct) Hint: See page 734.

  18. Question All of the following were true of the Jones Act of 1916 EXCEPT • it granted to the Philippines the boon of territorial status and promised independence as soon as a “stable government” could be established. • Wilson’s racial prejudices made it difficult for him to anticipate anything other than a long political tutelage for the Filipinos. • not until thirty years later did the United States accept Philippine independence. • it blatantly contradicted the Open Door policy set by Secretary of State Bryan’s predecessor John Hay.

  19. Answer All of the following were true of the Jones Act of 1916 EXCEPT • it granted to the Philippines the boon of territorial status and promised independence as soon as a “stable government” could be established. • Wilson’s racial prejudices made it difficult for him to anticipate anything other than a long political tutelage for the Filipinos. • not until thirty years later did the United States accept Philippine independence. • it blatantly contradicted the Open Door policy set by Secretary of State Bryan’s predecessor John Hay. (correct) Hint: See pages 734–735.

  20. Question All of the following were true of the Lusitania EXCEPT • it was torpedoed and sank off the coast of Ireland on May 7, 1915. • it was carrying forty-two hundred cases of small-arms ammunition, a fact the Germans used to justify the sinking. • Americans were swept by a wave of shock and anger at this act of “mass murder” and “piracy.” • the Midwestern United States seethed with talk of fighting, but the rest of the country showed a strong distaste for hostilities.

  21. Answer All of the following were true of the Lusitania EXCEPT • it was torpedoed and sank off the coast of Ireland on May 7, 1915. • it was carrying forty-two hundred cases of small-arms ammunition, a fact the Germans used to justify the sinking. • Americans were swept by a wave of shock and anger at this act of “mass murder” and “piracy.” • the Midwestern United States seethed with talk of fighting, but the rest of the country showed a strong distaste for hostilities. (correct) Hint: See page 740.