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Formative Assessment Institute. Barb Rowenhorst Janet Hensley Lisa Hafer Marilyn Hofer Pam Lange. Credit Options. Remember to sign in each session PTBS Credit Graduate Credit – University of Wyoming. Seven Strategies for Assessment FOR Learning. Where am I going?

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Formative Assessment Institute

Barb Rowenhorst

Janet Hensley

Lisa Hafer

Marilyn Hofer

Pam Lange


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Credit Options

Remember to sign in each session

  • PTBS Credit

  • Graduate Credit – University of Wyoming


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Seven Strategies for Assessment FOR Learning

Where am I going?

Provide a clear and understandable vision of the learning target.

Use examples and models of strong and weak work.

Where am I now?

3. Offer regular descriptive feedback.

4. Teach students to self-assess and set goals.

How can I close the gap?

5. Design lessons to focus on one aspect of quality at a time.

6. Teach students focused revision.

7. Engage students in self-reflection and let them keep track of and share their learning.


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Outcomes of November FAI

  • To have a deeper understanding of learning targets and to set learning targets based on Wyoming/District Standards and PAWS Assessment Descriptors.

  • To have an understanding of descriptive feedback in order for classroom implementation.

  • To use strong and weak student work to drive instruction.

  • To use an action plan to guide the implementation of quality assessment practices.


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FAI November Agenda

November 12

8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Welcome

Seven Strategies

Goals

Of and For ArticleLearning Target

Team Discussion Time

November 13

8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Welcome back

Descriptive Feedback

Looking at Strong and Weak Work

Team Discussion Time


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Parking Lot

We will collect items periodically and address to the entire group:

  • Non-content

  • Content


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Norms

  • Honor Private Think Time

  • Allow time for individual reflection in order to be concise with our comments

  • Allow for a variety of think time

  • Own Responsibility

  • Be punctual (Start on time, end on time)

  • Maintain focus (Minimize sidebar conversation)

  • Share Air Time

  • Share information

  • Respect the signal to refocus


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Transition

Marilyn Hofer

Janet Hensley


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A Look at Our Goals

  • Review goals of all districts (FAI District Goals)

  • Come to consensus on ‘where you are’ with the goal for your district.


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  • Handout: FAI District Goals

  • Take a look at all of the goals

    • Notice differences and similarities

  • Find your team goal

  • Come to consensus about where you are on your journey.

  • Note areas you need to revamp.

  • Determine your next steps in attaining your goal or the next steps in formative assessment.


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Article:

What a Difference a Word Makes

by Rick Stiggins and Jan Chappuis

  • Reconnect with Stiggins’ work on formative assessment.

  • Begin thinking of approaches to transform assessment ideas into actual practices.


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Read Article:

  • What a Difference a Word Makes

    • Highlight aspects that are

    • key to your district.

  • Use information from the quotes listed which relate to areas that we have or are working on during FAI. (handout)

10 Minutes


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  • Using each quote,

  • assess where you currently are

  • and where you want to go

  • in each of the areas

  • Address each quote at the district, building, instructional facilitator and teacher level.

  • Note specifics to help you ‘on your way’.

20 Minutes





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Assessment: Of and FOR

Assessment of Learning (Summative)

How much have students learned up to a

particular point in time?

Assessment for Learning (Formative)

How can we use assessments to help students learn more?


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Assessment: OF and FOR

Handout (Page 33)

Summarization: OF and FOR Assessment

Is there anything else you might add to the handout after reading the article or from your own experiences?


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Learning TargetsPam and Barb


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Seven Strategies for Assessment FOR Learning

  • Where am I going?

  • Provide a clear and understandable vision of the learning target.

  • Use examples and models of strong and weak work.

  • Where am I now?

  • Offer regular descriptive feedback.

  • Teach students to self-assess and set goals.

  • How can I close the gap?

  • 5. Design lessons to focus on one aspect of quality at a time.

  • 6. Teach students focused revision.

  • 7. Engage students in self-reflection and let them keep track of and share their learning.




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I write learning targets for every unit I teach. different levels of Bloom’s.




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Standard student accountability.

Students

Move

Up

The

Ladder

Through

A

Sequence

Of

Learning

Steps

Assessment OF Learning

Learning Target

Learning Target

Learning Target

Assessments FOR Learning

Learning Target

Learning Target

Learning Target


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Learning Targets student accountability.

Learning Targets let the students know what we want them to learn prior to them learning the content.


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Learning Targets student accountability.Pages 61-74


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Kinds of Achievement Targets student accountability.

Knowledge targets

  • the facts and concepts we want students to know.

    Reasoning targets

  • students use what they know to reason and solve problems.

    Skill targets

  • students use their knowledge and reasoning to act skillfully.

    Product targets

  • students use their knowledge, reasoning, and skills to create a concrete product.

    Dispositional targets

  • students attitudes about school and learning.


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Taxonomy Model Handout student accountability.


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6 student accountability.th Grade Reading Standard


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Learning Target Analysis student accountability.


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Learning Targets student accountability.

A learning targetis any achievement expectation we hold for students.

It is a statement of what we want the students to learn.


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Is this a Learning Target? student accountability.A mathematics example

What do you think…

  • Math

  • Decimals

  • Page 152 in the book

  • Go on a “decimal hunt”

  • Correctly read decimals and put them in numerical order


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Is this a Learning Target? student accountability.

What do you think…

  • Complete a senior project

  • Build a bird feeder

  • Analyze a state report

  • Safely use a band saw

  • Construct a diorama


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Learning Targets student accountability.

  • The best way students remember things is to hook it to something they already know.

    • How will this connect to something else they already learned?

    • How can the students have a broader perspective over their world?

    • Dates are not as important as why it happened or what they learned.


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Learning Targets student accountability.

How are learning targets used?

  • Write two or three for each unit of study.

  • Post the statements in your classroom so students can see them every day.

  • Bring them back over and over again. Example: Does this information help you to understand where we are headed?

  • Make continuous connections over and over again.


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Learning Progression student accountability.tied toLearning Targets . . .It all fits together


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Guided Practice student accountability.

Use same 6th grade standard

Select Benchmark

Determine Assessment Descriptors


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Let’s Practice student accountability.

Post on chart paper


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Standard student accountability.

Students

Move

Up

The

Ladder

Through

A

Sequence

Of

Learning

Steps

Assessment OF Learning

Learning Target

Learning Target

Learning Target

Assessments FOR Learning

Learning Target

Learning Target

Learning Target


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Discussion Questions . . . student accountability.

  • How will teachers know the learning targets are being met along the way?

  • How will students know the learning targets are being met along the way?


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Team Discussion student accountability.Time


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Formative student accountability.Assessment Institute

Day 2

Barb Rowenhorst

Janet Hensley

Lisa Hafer

Marilyn Hofer

Pam Lange


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Credit Options student accountability.

Remember to sign in each session

  • PTBS Credit

  • Graduate Credit – University of Wyoming


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Descriptive Feedback student accountability.Marilyn and Lisa


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Seven Strategies for Assessment FOR Learning student accountability.

Where am I going?

Provide a clear and understandable vision of the learning target.

Use examples and models of strong and weak work.

Where am I now?

3. Offer regular descriptive feedback.

4. Teach students to self-assess and set goals.

How can I close the gap?

5. Design lessons to focus on one aspect of quality at a time.

6. Teach students focused revision.

7. Engage students in self-reflection and let them keep track of and share their learning.


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Offer Regular Descriptive Feedback student accountability.

  • Look at research on feedback

  • Identify descriptive feedback

  • Discuss manageability

  • Give peer feedback about learning target




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A Fairy Tale and weaknesses.


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Providing Feedback and weaknesses.

“The most powerful single modification that enhances student achievement is feedback. The simple prescription for improving education must be ‘dollops of feedback’” (Hattie, 1992, p. 9).

Robert Marzano, Classroom Instruction that Works Chapter 8, p. 96


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Feedback, and weaknesses.the Breakfast of Champions

Dr. Ed Porthan:

Get serious about feedback. Make it:

  • Immediate

  • Specific

  • Cause/effect

  • Coaching for growth

  • Preserving dignity


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Feedback, and weaknesses.the Breakfast of Champions

Dr Robert Marzano:

Powerful feedback is

  • Corrective

  • Timely

  • Specific

  • Self monitoring


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Providing Feedback and weaknesses.

  • Feedback should be corrective in nature; that means that it provides students with an explanation of what they are doing that is correct and what is incorrect.

    --Marzano, Pickering, & Pollock, 2001, p. 96.


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Providing Feedback and weaknesses.

  • Feedback should be specific to a criterion. Criterion-referenced feedback tells students where they stand relative to a specific target of knowledge or skill.

    --Marzano, 2001, p. 185.


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Descriptive Feedback and weaknesses.Stiggins

  • The giving of marks and the grading function are overemphasized, while the giving of useful advice and the learning function are underemphasized.

  • Always discuss what works and why and then give suggestions for fine-tuning and why.

  • Feedback is most effective when it points out success and is designed to stimulate correction of errors relevant to the task.


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Descriptive Feedback and weaknesses.Stiggins

  • “Providing students with descriptive feedback is a crucial part of increasing achievement. Feedback helps students answer the question, ‘Where am I now?’ with respect to ‘Where do I need to be?’

    -Classroom Assessment for Student Learning, page 44


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Give it a try and weaknesses.


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Descriptive Feedback and weaknesses.

Individually

As a team

3. Discuss the successful statements. What specifically helps students answer “Where am I now?”, “Where do I need to be?”

4. Discuss the non-descriptive statements. Reword them to help students answer “Where am I now?”, “Where do I need to be?”

  • Star three successful statements of descriptive feedback.

  • Circle three non-descriptive statements of feedback.


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Share Examples and weaknesses.


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How do I make it manageable? and weaknesses.

Select a sticky note:

Administrator--Orange

Instructional facilitator--Purple

High school– Lime Green

Middle school--Hot Pink

Elementary--Blue

Other--Gold


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How do I make it manageable? and weaknesses.

  • On your sticky note, write your best management tip to insure successful feedback for all students.

  • Find someone else with the same color sticky note. While on break, share your tip(s). Return from break, attach sticky note to matching chart paper.


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Although frequently used in the classroom, Providing Feedback is commonly under-used in terms of its power to improve student achievement.


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Same Principles Apply to Feedback is commonly Peer Feedback


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Actual comments I have either given about peer work or received from peers

  • I like this. You have hit the target.

  • Where is the student in this?

  • Noble seems to be an arrogant word. Could we use honorable instead?

  • Obvious gaps.

  • Generic enough to extrapolate out specific job related goals.

  • The action verb narrows the focus of the question.

  • This won’t work.


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Descriptive Feedback received from peers

  • Each person at your table should have four large sticky notes.

  • Examine posters of at least four team’s learning targets.

  • Write one piece of feedback that points out success and one that stimulates correction or guides improvement.


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Using the Feedback received from peers

  • As a team, revise your learning target based on the feedback you received.

  • If time remains, revise your other learning targets based on the feedback you gave and received.


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Descriptive Feedback is to Formative Assessment received from peersas a tire is to a monster truck.You must have that part to make sure the monster truck (or program) will run!


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More to the Feedback Story received from peers

  • Developmental feedback

  • Informational feedback

  • Rubrics as feedback

  • Self feedback

  • Student led feedback

  • Warm and cool feedback

  • Observable feedback

  • Research on feedback


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Strong and Weak Student Work received from peersBarb and Janet


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Seven Strategies for Assessment FOR Learning received from peers

Where am I going?

Provide a clear and understandable vision of the learning target.

Use examples and models of strong and weak work.

Where am I now?

3. Offer regular descriptive feedback.

4. Teach students to self-assess and set goals.

How can I close the gap?

5. Design lessons to focus on one aspect of quality at a time.

6. Teach students focused revision.

7. Engage students in self-reflection and let them keep track of and share their learning.


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No matter what content area I teach, I work with students during every unit to discuss strong and weak student work examples.





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Summative and Formative Assessment work.

Assessment of Learning (Summative):

How much have students learned up to a particular point in time?

Assessment for Learning (Formative):

How can we use assessments to help students learn more?





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Why is Examining Student Work Important? work.

How can I close the gap?



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Looking at Student Work work.

  • Place a colored sticky note on the matching-colored student math work.

    Work Independently

  • Rank order the pieces of student work from 1 to 5

    • (1 = weakest and 5 = strongest)

  • Write the rank order on the sticky note attached to each student work.


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    Looking at Student Work work.

    • Place each sticky note on the chart with the corresponding ranking.

    Math Rank #1

    (Weakest)


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    Looking at Student Work work.

    What observations can be made

    from the data wall?



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    Strong Work Criteria work.

    • As a team, which piece might constitute an example of Strong Student Work?

    • Complete the handout…


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    Looking at Student Work work.

    What might be some ways we can begin the process of ensuring there is consistency within:

    • departments?

    • grade levels?

    • content areas?

    • building?

    • district?


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    Looking at Student Work work.

    • Provide clear and understandable expectations

    • Provide examples of strong and weak student work

    • Post strong student work on the classroom wall for students to use as a guide

    • (Emily’s Story)



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    Protocol for to get there.”

    Looking at Student Work. . .


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    Student writing samples (6) to get there.”


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    • As a team, use the to get there.”Play 5 Protocol and Recording Sheet as you look at the 6 pieces of student writing samples.

    • Use the PAWS Writing Rubric and the 6+1 Writing Traits Poster to help guide your discussions.

    • Remember to look at and discuss the “Organization” Trait.


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    Group Reflection: to get there.”

    Think of ways to use the Looking at Student Work Protocol.


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    Looking at to get there.”

    “Classroom”

    Student Work


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    Looking at Classroom to get there.”Student Work

    If teachers work together to examine their students’ and their own work, they’ll be asking:

    Whatam I teaching?

    Why am I teaching it?

    How am I teaching it?

    Why am I teaching it this way?

    How do I knowmy students are getting it?

    How domy students knowthey are getting it?



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    Protocol: “Classroom” Student Work’ to get there.”

    Section #1:

    Discuss the teacher’s expectation of student work

    Determine the Writing Standard being addressed.


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    to get there.”Looking at Student Work’

    Form and Protocol

    (Sample included)

    Section #2:

    Sort the students’ work into 4 piles using the PAWS Writing Rubric

    far below standard,

    approaching standard,

    meeting standard, or

    exceeding standard

    List the students’ names under each category.


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    Section #3 to get there.”:

    Choose one student from each category to record observations.

    Describe specific observations of what that student knows.

    Section #4:

    For each student, describe specific observations of each student’s learning needs.


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    to get there.”Looking at Student Work’ Form and Protocol

    Section #5: Most important section

    List strategies that the teacher can do to address the students’ needs (individual or small group instruction).

    Learning Needs for ALL Students (whole class instruction): Strategies that could be implemented “whole” group


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    • As a team, use the to get there.”Class Protocol and Recording Sheet as you look at the pieces of student writing samples.

    • Use the PAWS Writing Rubric and the 6+1 Writing Traits Poster to help guide your discussions.


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    Large Group Report to get there.”

    What insights did you gain from using these protocols?

    • How might you develop a way to look at student work in your grade/building?


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    Homework to get there.”

    • As a group, select and signup for a discussion/presentation topic:

    • Learning Targets

      • Deconstruct/unpacked standards

      • Five levels of learning targets

      • Writing learning targets

      • Student understanding of learning targets

    • Descriptive Feedback

      • Using descriptive feedback

      • Management of feedback

    • Strong and Weak Student Work

      • Discuss with students

      • Discuss with peers

      • Use a protocol

      • Students understand expectations


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    Homework to get there.”

    • Presentation will be conducted in small groups

    • Five to seven minutes per presentation (discussion may follow each presentation)

    • Each person is accountable for sharing the group’s presentation

      • Administrator, Instructional Facilitator, Teacher

    • Internet will not be available at Community Center

    • Presentation may or may not include handouts

      • If your team elects to use a handout, please plan for 50 copies total


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    FAI Training Dates to get there.”2007-2008Mark Your Calendars

    • September 18-20, 2007

    • November 12-13, 2007

    • February 4-5, 2008

    • March 10-11, 2008


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    Team Discussion Time to get there.”