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Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports (PBIS). Natalie Hilton- PBIS Coach Lincoln Public Schools August, 2013. Why Do We Behave the Way We Do?. Behaviors are LEARNED and continue because they serve a PURPOSE or FUNCTION

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positive behavior intervention and supports pbis

Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports (PBIS)

Natalie Hilton- PBIS Coach

Lincoln Public Schools

August, 2013

why do we behave the way we do
Why Do We Behave the Way We Do?
  • Behaviors are LEARNED and continue because they serve a PURPOSE or FUNCTION
  • We engage in behaviors because we have learned that a DESIRED OUTCOME occurs

(OSEP on PBIS- Effective Schoolwide Interventions)

slide3
PBIS
  • Within the last 20 years significant increases have been noted with aggressive behaviors, acts of school violence, bullying, and student victimization within school settings. Problematic behaviors have become one of the greatest challenges for educators to face.
  • When students are noncompliant, aggressive, disruptive, and/or disrespectful, they impede their own learning as well as the learning of others.
  • Creating a safe, orderly and positive learning environment is crucial in order to enhance learning outcomes for all students (A. Champion, B. Pray, M. Coutts, M. Zabel)
what is school wide positive behavior support
What is School-wide Positive Behavior Support?
  • School-wide PBIS is:
    • IS a decision making framework that guides selection, integration, and implementation of the best evidence-based academic and behavioral practices for improving important academic and behavior outcomes for all students.
  • Evidence-based features of SW-PBIS
    • Prevention
    • Define and teach positive social expectations
    • Acknowledge positive behavior
    • Arrange consistent consequences for problem behavior
    • On-going collection and use of data for decision-making
    • Continuum of intensive, individual interventions.
    • Administrative leadership – Team-based implementation (Systems that support effective practices)

(OSEP on PBIS- Effective Schoolwide Interventions)

slide5
PBIS
  • There is a great deal of research supporting the use of PBIS in school systems (www.pbis.org)
  • PBIS is used as a means for reducing and preventing problem behaviors in schools.
  • PBIS emphasizes altering the environment and preventing inappropriate behaviors, by teaching desired skills and reinforcing appropriate behavior (U.S. Department of Education 2007).
slide6

Critical Elements

PBIS Team

Faculty/Staff Commitment

Expectations and Rules Developed

Plans for Teaching expectations/rules

Reward/Recognition Program Established

Effective Procedures for Dealing with Problem Behaviors

Data Entry and Analysis Plan Established

Classroom Systems

Evaluation

Implementation Plan

(OSEP on PBIS- Effective Schoolwide Interventions)

slide7

School-wide Behavior Expectations

  • For all students, across all settings
  • Guidelines:
    • 3 – 5 Expectations
    • State positively
    • Use common & few words
  • Why?
    • Consistent communications
    • Consistent language

(OSEP on PBIS- Effective Schoolwide Interventions)

four systems of pbis
Four Systems of PBIS
  • School-wide
  • Classroom
  • Common Areas (e.g. playground, hallways)
  • Individual Students
slide9

Develop an efficient teaching system

  • Provide initial lesson plans and/or lesson plan format to teach specific behaviors identified on the Matrix

(OSEP on PBIS- Effective Schoolwide Interventions)

other features of pbis
Other Features of PBIS
  • PBIS is based on three levels of prevention
  • Primary (Tier 1) (80% of Students)
  • Secondary (Tier 2) (15% of Students)
  • Tertiary (Tier 3) (5% of Students)

PBIS establishes a continuum of behavior support.

PBIS is not a curriculum, discipline package, or product. It is a process for individualized and sustained decision making, planning, and problem solving.

three tiered model of student supports

get these tiers

of support

in order to meet benchmarks.

These students

+

=

Three Tiered Model of Student Supports

Three Tiered Model of Student Supports

The goal of the tiers is student success, not labeling.

(OSEP on PBIS- Effective Schoolwide Interventions)

slide12

Triangle Activity:

Applying the Three-Tiered Logic to Your School

Practices, Initiatives, Programs for a FEW

Tier 3

Tier 2

Practices, Initiatives, Programs for SOME

Tier 1

Practices, Initiatives, Programs for ALL

(OSEP on PBIS Effective Schoolwide Interventions)

tier i core universal

TIER I: Core, Universal

TIER I: Core, Universal

GOAL: 100% of students achieve

at high levels

Tier I: Implementing well researched programs and practices demonstrated to produce good outcomes for the majority of students.

Tier I: Effective if at least 80% are meeting benchmarks with access to Core/Universal Instruction.

Tier I: Begins with clear goals:

What exactly do we expect all students to learn ?

How will we know if and when they’ve learned it?

How you we respond when some students don’t learn?

How will we respond when some students have already learned?

Questions 1 and 2 help us ensure a guaranteed and viable core curriculum

13

13

(OSEP on PBIS- Effective Schoolwide Interventions)

slide14

What would a positive, encouraging school climate look like?

  • Students know what is expected of them and choose to do so because they:
    • Know what to do
    • Have the skills to do it
    • See the natural benefits for acting responsibly
  • Adults and students have more time to:
    • Focus on relationships
    • Focus on classroom instruction
  • There is an instructional approach to discipline
    • Instances of problem behavior are opportunities to learn and practice pro-social behavior

14

(OSEP on PBIS- Effective Schoolwide Interventions)

slide15

Failure

(punishment)

Success(reinforcement)

Receive frequent recognition & encouragement

4 : 1

(Scott, 2008)

slide16

The quickest way to change behavior….in anyone.

Research indicates that you

can improve behavior

by 80% just by pointing out

what someone is doing

correctly.

Point out what they’re

doing right!

Laura Riffel, OSEP

slide17

Tips for Providing Acknowledgement

"Thank you for being

on time this morning, that's very responsible."

  • Name behavior and expectation observed

(Teaching Matrix)

  • Tie-in recognition to school-wide recognition system

(OSEP on PBIS- Effective Schoolwide Interventions)

teaching behavior and academics

Tell

Teaching Behavior and Academics

Reteach

Show

Feedback

Practice

(OSEP on PBIS- Effective Schoolwide Interventions)

getting success when you want students to learn and follow rules and procedures
Getting Success When You Want Students To Learn And Follow Rules and Procedures
  • If you just tell students the rules, 5% of them will establish responsible behavior.
  • If you tell students the rules and then demonstrate the correct procedures, 10% of them will comply.
  • If you tell students the rules, demonstrate the correct procedures, and then let your students practice the expected behaviors, you may get 15% to 20% of your students to develop responsible habits.
  • If you tell students the rules, demonstrate the correct procedures, provide time for students to practice expected behaviors, and then re-teach and maintain those expected behaviors, 80% to 90% or more of your students will develop responsible habits for behavior.
impacts of sw pbis on student outcomes
Impacts of SW-PBIS on Student Outcomes
  • Significant reduction in school-level suspensions
  • Students in PBIS schools were 32% less likely to receive an office discipline referral
  • A positive effect for school-level academic performance(Bradshaw et al., JPBI, 2010)
  • Significant reductions in teacher-rated behavior problems
    • Rejection & bullying (Waasdorp, Bradshaw, & Leaf, 2012)
    • Service use (e.g., counseling, special education referral, office referrals)
    • Reductions in concentration problems and aggressive/disruptive behavior, and improvements in prosocial behavior and emotion regulation (Bradshaw et al., submitted)
      • Some indication that the intervention effects are strongest the earlier students are exposed to SW-PBIS (Bradshaw et al., submitted)
slide21

“Exposure to exclusionary discipline has been shown not to improve school outcomes, but in fact to be associated with higher rates of school dropout.”

(Skiba, Peterson, and Williams, 1997)

slide22

Why Develop a System for Teaching Behavior?

  • Procedures and routines create structure for staff and students
  • Repetition is key to learning new skills:
    • For a child to learn something new, it needs to be repeated on average of ___ times
      • Adults average ____ - Joyce and Showers, 2006
    • For a child to unlearn an old behavior and replace with a new behavior, the new behavior must be repeated on average ___ times (Harry Wong)

8

25

28

lincoln public schools
Lincoln Public Schools
  • LPS plans to fully implement PBIS in all elementary, middle, and high schools in the next 3-5 years.
  • They have developed a District PBIS Leadership Team.
  • LPS is working with an outside trainer to help with the implementation of PBIS. This school year, middle school and high school staff will meet with the outside trainer 1 time per quarter, and a teleconference (with the outside trainer) will also take place with schools 1 time per quarter.
  • Currently, each middle school and each high school has identified an internal building coach (e.g. assistant principal).
lincoln public schools1
Lincoln Public Schools
  • Scott Eckman has been hired as the district’s PBIS Coordinator.
  • Natalie Hilton (School Psychologist) and Shannon Hall-Schmeckpeper (School Psychologist) have been hired as the district’s two PBIS Coaches.
  • For the 2013-2014 school year the District is really focusing on middle school and high school implementation of Tier 1 building supports.
  • For the 2014-2015 school year, PBIS tier 1 implementation will begin at the elementary level.
  • This school year each PBIS Coach and Coordinator will meet with and help 6 or 7 schools each, with implementation.
  • At the end of July, eight LPS District Staff attended a two-day PBIS training in Chicago (including the two PBIS Coaches and PBIS Coordinator).
roles of the pbis coaches
Roles of the PBIS Coaches
  • To be familiar with training material
  • Attend team training with the teams.
  • Support team action planning.
  • Work as a partner with administration to provide necessary resources
  • Communicate with division coordinator for necessary resources
  • Review Benchmarks of Quality (BoQ) and relevant training tools to ensure fidelity
  • Share implementation products and outcomes with division coordinator
  • Attend coaches meetings and other regional events
  • Visit other schools implementing PBIS
slide26

Teach in Context

…in the cafeteria

…in the restrooms

(OSEP on PBIS- Effective Schoolwide Interventions)

slide31

Wheel of Fortune

(OSEP on PBIS- Effective Schoolwide Interventions)

slide32

Recognizing Staff

  • Keep staff motivated and appreciated!
  • Use community resources and local businesses
  • Incentives for staff could include:
    • Tangibles
    • Tokens
    • Symbolic
    • Celebrations
slide33

teach.

  • “If a child doesn’t know how to read, we

teach.

  • If a child doesn’t know how to swim, we
  • If a child doesn’t know how to multiply, we

teach.

teach.

  • If a child doesn’t know how to drive, we
  • If a child doesn’t know how to behave, we...

teach?punish?

  • Why can’t we finish the last sentence as automatically as we do the others?”
  • John Herner (NASDE President ) Counterpoint 1998, page 2