PIGLET MANAGEMENT - 2 (Birth to Weaning) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

piglet management 2 birth to weaning n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
PIGLET MANAGEMENT - 2 (Birth to Weaning) PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
PIGLET MANAGEMENT - 2 (Birth to Weaning)

play fullscreen
1 / 23
PIGLET MANAGEMENT - 2 (Birth to Weaning)
156 Views
Download Presentation
holleb
Download Presentation

PIGLET MANAGEMENT - 2 (Birth to Weaning)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. PIGLET MANAGEMENT - 2(Birth to Weaning)

  2. Avoid moving individual piglets around. Identify and move fall-outs by 5-7 d of age. Otherwise leave them put. • What is a fall-out?

  3. What is a fall-out? • Other names Fall-backs, runts • Smaller, less active piglet • 2 to 7 days of age

  4. What is a fall-out? • Bony and angular • Flat belly • Loose skin • Hairy

  5. Fall-outs • Nursing a poor producing teat • Shy, non-aggressive pig missing feedings • Many flourish with better milk access

  6. Several fall-outs Teat access Teat problems

  7. Dealing with poor milk supply • Several pigs in litter affected 􀂄 Treat for mastitis 􀂄 Milk replacer 􀂄 Creep feed • Single pig in litter (i. e., fall-back) 􀂄 Many will flourish with more milk 􀂄 Nurse sows

  8. A fall-out to move • Doesn’t join littermates to nurse • Not selected a teat • Shy, timid • 10 littermates

  9. Key points • Avoid moving individual fall-backs • Move 8 to 10 fall-backs at once to a nurse sow • Identify and move fall-backs by 5-7 day of age • Otherwise leave them put

  10. WEANING WEIGHT - Targets • 8 kg if weaned at 4 weeks • 6 kg if weaned at 3 weeks • > 4 kg if weaned at 17 days If poor check: • Litter size • Birth weight • Sow condition/ feed intake / milk production • Cross fostering • Creep feeding management • Health, hygiene, environment

  11. Feed Intake In Newly Weaned Piglets • On the sow piglets eat > 12 times a day: -Frequent small meals • On the sow piglets eat together: -Plenty of feeder space, no separation of feeder spaces • Pigs have a tremendous sense of smell: -Clean feeders -Frequently remove stale feed

  12. Piglet Diseases • Frequently observe pigs for signs of disease so prompt treatment is possible • congenital defect seen is herniation (2%), followed by cryptorchidism (1-2%

  13. Diarrhea (scours) and dehydration A dehydrated piglet Diarrhea (scours) Normal, bright yellow, solid fecal material

  14. E. coli • Should affect < 3% of litters • Mostly 1-5 days of age • Main defense -Antibiotics in milk • Treat entire litter with antibiotics -Gentamicin -Spectinomycin • Access to water

  15. Difficulty walking and standing,trembling or comatose • Hypoglycemia -Low blood sugar • Streptococcus suis -Strep suis -Strep meningitis Swollen hock joint

  16. Swollen joints • Bacterial infection • Identify/treat early • -Penicillin • Severely swollen • -Treatment ineffective • -Euthanize

  17. Other conditions Vomiting Rough hair coat, sluggishness, huddling

  18. Greasy, Sticky and Dirty Skin • Staphylococcus hyicus invades skin • Antibiotic therapy when symptoms appear • Wash piglet; treat topically • Minimize cuts in skin and dirty equipment

  19. Some Disadvantaged PigsShould Be Euthanized Acceptable: Barbiturates, CO2, potassium chloride in conjunction with general anesthesia, penetrating captive bolt Conditional: Inhalant anesthetics, CO, chloral hydrate (IV, after sedation), gunshot, electrocution, blow to the head (< 3 weeks of age) • Carbon dioxide • Electrocution • Anesthetic overdose • Blunt trauma

  20. Practicing proper euthanasia techniques that are appropriate for the size of the pig is one of the single most important elements to responsibly address animal welfare. National Pork Board P.O. Box 9114 Des Moines, IA 50306 USA PHONE: (515) 223-2600 FAX: (515) 223-2646 E-MAIL: porkboard@porkboard.org WEB: http://www.porkboard.org

  21. Dead pig/placenta disposal • Remove dead pigs/placenta promptly Incineration

  22. Questions?

  23. References • http://cal.vet.upenn.edu/projects/swine/bio/grow/nursing/hm.html • http://www.ncsu.edu/project/swine_extension/ncporkconf/2002/lay.htm • http://www.avma.org/issues/animal_welfare/default.asp