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Grammar Tip of the Week!. Week Three Conjunctions and Semicolons (from Strunk and White’s Elements of Style ). Comma + Conjunction. An independent clause is a “simple sentence,” containing just a subject and a verb. Conjunctions: F.A.N.B.O.Y.S

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grammar tip of the week

Grammar Tip of the Week!

Week Three

Conjunctions and Semicolons

(from Strunk and White’s Elements of Style)

comma conjunction
Comma + Conjunction
  • An independent clause is a “simple sentence,” containing just a subject and a verb.
  • Conjunctions: F.A.N.B.O.Y.S
    • for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so
  • Always place a comma before a conjunction introducing an independent clause.
    • It is nearly half past five, andwe cannot reach town before dark.
    • Stevenson’s romances are entertaining, for they are full of exciting adventures.
semicolon
Semicolon
  • Do not join independent clauses with a comma.
  • The correct punctuation is a semicolon.
    • It is nearly half past five; we cannot reach town before dark.
    • Stevenson’s romances are entertaining; they are full of exciting adventures.
  • Equally Correct:
    • It is nearly half past five. We cannot reach town before dark.
which is the most efficient
Which is the Most Efficient?
  • Consider the three examples:
    • It is half past five. We cannot reach the town before dark.
    • It is nearly half past five, and we cannot reach the town before dark.
    • It is nearly half past five; we cannot reach the town before dark.
  • This simple method is useful! Use it when writing of things of cause and consequence!
adverbs
Adverbs
  • The bizarre nature of adverbs is a conversation for another time…
  • For Now: How? In What Way? To What Extent?
    • Adverbs generally attempt to answer these questions
  • Examples:
    • The dog howledconstantly during the night.
    • I amevidently wrong in this matter.
conjunctive adverbs
Conjunctive Adverbs
  • A semicolon and a comma are used together when a conjunctive adverb separates two independent clauses.
    • This is a great way to vary your language!
  • Examples:
    • I live; furthermore, I’ll die.
    • I wanted to meet up with you; however, I was delayed at work.
    • These things actually happened; otherwise, I wouldn’t have sworn to witnessing them!
partial list of conjunctive adverbs
Partial List of Conjunctive Adverbs
  • According
  • Additionally
  • Besides
  • Consequently
  • Finally
  • Furthermore
  • Meanwhile
  • Namely
  • Equally
  • Hence
  • However
  • In addition
  • In comparison
  • Instead
  • Likewise
  • Nevertheless
  • Nonetheless
  • Otherwise
  • Similarly
  • Still
  • Subsequently
  • Therefore