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State Benefits
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State Benefits

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  1. State Benefits Too important to leave to chance!

  2. Possible sources of State retirement income • Basic State pension • Graduated pension • State Second Pension (previously SERPS) • Pension Credit means tested

  3. Which camp do you fall into? Reach State Pension Age before 6 April 2010? Reach State Pension Age on or after 6 April 2010?

  4. Which camp do you fall into? More service needed to achieve maximum Basic State Pension Minimum BSP payable - 25% of full rate HRP counts till child 16 Easier to earn full Basic State Pension (30 year rule)Even modest level of BSP payable HRP counts till child 12

  5. Pre April 2010 Minimum Qualifying Years target to achieve full Basic State Pension Men 44 years and also women with State Pension Age of 65 Women 39 years with State Pension Age of 60 In between 39 and 44 for women born between April 1950 and April 1955 From April 2010 Minimum Qualifying Years target to achieve full Basic State Pension 30 years for everyone Basic State Retirement Benefit changes 6 April 2010

  6. Pre 6 April 2010 Minimum Basic State Pension payable 25% of maximum rate Autocredits between 60 and 65 Home Responsibilities Protection credits Until youngest child is 16 Reduce the Qualifying Years target Adult Dependant Increase (ADI) pension available From 6 April 2010 Minimum Basic State Pension payable Any amount payable No autocredits Home Responsibilities Protection credits Until youngest child is 12 Treated as Qualifying Years including weeks ADI phased out from April 2010 for existing claimants Basic State Retirement Benefit changes 6 April 2010

  7. Home ResponsibilitiesProtection and gaps • In 2008 the Government launched an investigation to find why thousands of women were not receiving the right level of pension • Problem relates to failure to highlight entitlement to HRP on a woman’s NI record • Also gaps for years between April 1996 and April 2002 can be made good (to ‘buy back’ the missing years at a special rate) • The Pension, Disability and Carers Service is reviewing the NI records of a group of around 73,000 women who could use the special terms to claim some backdated pension for a past period

  8. Pre 6 April 2010 Winter Fuel Allowance Payable Winter after reaching age 60 provided qualified in previous September Pension Increases until change Based on RPIAnnual change as reflected in September RPI index From 6 April 2010 Winter Fuel Allowance Will rise incrementally to 65 between 2010 and 2020 Pension increases after change From 2012 at earliest -restore link to National Average Earnings for all in receipt of pension including those reaching SPA before then – subject to affordability Basic State Retirement Benefit changes 6 April 2010

  9. Things to consider • Impact on your budgeting • when will my wife’s / partner’s pension become payable? • what will be payable • Basic State Pension • Additional Pension (SERPS / S2P) • Graduated Pension if you were in that scheme before 6 April 1975 • the changes to future State Pension Age increasing • 66 from 2024 to 2026 • 67 from 2034 to 2036 • 68 from 2034 to 2046 • if planning ahead what impact if any will my savings / pension have on means tested Pension Credit at 60 and 65?

  10. Things to consider • Impact on your budgeting • how much will be paid and when will it increase? • level of inflation protection (current and from a future date) • impact on my occupational pension benefits if they are subject to some adjustment for State benefits (State levelling or ‘claw back’) • can build up more State pension after you leave (S2P) until State Pension date • Earning above the Lower Earnings Limit • Carer credits • Enhanced benefits for lower earners

  11. Things to consider • Make sure that the figures are correct! • Ways to maximise benefits and plug any gaps • Make sure you don’t pay Class 3 when no need to • Ensure you don’t pay NI on future ‘pay’ under State Pension Age! • Ensure you claim benefits that are due • Winter Fuel Allowance • Married couple’s additional pension (form of safety net) • Pension Credit (maybe your parents now and you in time) • Attendance Allowance (later in life)

  12. Job Seeker’s Allowance • Payment • £ 64.30 / week (contribution based) • Paid for 6 months ( max.... 182 days) • NI credits awarded - even if JSA not payable • Occupational pension of £50 / week or more will affect amount payable, irrespective of age. May mean no JSA payable • Changes from October 2008 as part of Green Paper proposals ‘No one written off: reforming welfare to reward responsibility’

  13. Employment & Support Allowance • Introduced on 27th October 2008 • Replaced Incapacity Benefit for new claimants with a focus on a can do attitude not what someone cannot do • Expected to be a temporary benefit for the vast majority of individuals • Anyone already receiving Incapacity Benefit will be transferred to ESA between 2009 and 2013 after a medical assessment (Work Capability Assessment)

  14. Employment & Support Allowance If qualify for Enhanced Disability Premium or Severe Disability Premium £5.35 a week Extra support for those in Support Group £25.50 a week Work Related Activity Component £64.30 a week (single, all ages) £100.95 a week (couple all ages) Couple rate income tested only £64.30 a week (single, over 25) £100.95 a week (couple, over 25) Couple rate income tested only Basic Rate Assessment Phase Main Phase

  15. State Basic and Graduated Pension- rates (maxima) • Basic (own right) - £ 95.25 / week • Married woman ( on husband’s record) - £57.05 /week • Graduated pension - depends upon number of units ‘earned’. Unit value 11.53p each week

  16. 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 £62.45 a week £64.70 a week £66.75 a week £67.50 a week £72.50 a week £75.50 a week £77.45 a week £79.60 a week £82.05 a week £84.25 a week £87.30 a week £90.70 a week £95.25 a week Basic State Pension – historySingle person rate - maximum

  17. Man’s working life16-6549 contribution years Contribution years for 100% basic state pension44 years Woman’s working life16-60*44 contribution years Contribution years for 100% basic state pension39 years Qualifying Years needed for full Basic State pension * Changes gradually from 2010 until 2020 when it will be the same as for a man. Women born before April 6, 1950 are unaffected

  18. Man’s working life16-6549 contribution years Contribution years for 100% basic state pension44 years Woman’s working life16-60*44 contribution years Contribution years for 100% basic state pension39 years Qualifying Years needed for full Basic State pension Changed from 6 April 2010 when a 30 year test comes in! * Changes gradually from 2010 until 2020 when it will be the same as for a man. Women born before April 6, 1950 are unaffected

  19. Autocredits • 60-65 automatically credited • Only if • no liability for NI and • not spending over 6 months abroad in each tax year • you reach State Pension Age before April 2010

  20. Autocredits • 60-65 automatically credited • Only if • no liability for NI and • not spending over 6 months abroad in each tax year • you reach State Pension Age before April 2010 Disappears after 6 April 2010

  21. What’s your magic number? A quick test of understanding – current ‘rules’

  22. When am I fully paid up? • Example • Man started working in tax year when 16 • No ‘gaps’ in record

  23. When am I fully paid up? When I’m 55!

  24. Options ( before State Pension Age) • Further employment / self employment • Unemployment ( Job Seeker’s Allowance) • Illness (Employment & Support Allowance / Incapacity Benefit) • Non-employment (Class 3 NI contribution - £12.05 a week) • Auto-credits ( men 60 -65)*

  25. Some other angles

  26. Wife as a ‘full rate’contributor SPA Husband SPA Wife Top-up to 60% of husband’s pension – if greater Own right pension

  27. Wife as a ‘full rate’ contributor SPA Husband SPA Wife Receives greater of her own pension or 60% of husband’s pension.

  28. Wife as a ‘full rate’ contributor SPA Husband SPA Wife Receives greater of her own pension or 60% of husband’s pension.

  29. Wife paying ‘reduced rate’ NI SPA Husband SPA Wife No pension in own right 60% pension based on husband’s NI record

  30. Adult Dependant Increase • Available to increase a man’s or woman’s State Pension if another adult is financially dependent upon them • Since the 1980s, ADIs restricted to recipient’s spouse or person having care of the recipient’s children • Restrictions for a woman claiming for her husband • To claim for her husband she must have been entitled to an ADI of long-term Incapacity Benefit immediately before reaching SPA • Dependency test • The dependent does not have earnings or an occupational / personal pension above the standard rate of Jobseeker’s Allowance (£64.30 a week) , and • Not receiving benefit in their own right above £57.05 a week

  31. Adult Dependant Increase • From 2010 ADIs were set to become available on the same basis as husbands claim for their wives for • Women for their husbands • People in Civil Partnerships • From April 2010 ADIs will no longer be awarded but all existing entitlements will be protected up to 2020

  32. Home Responsibilities Protection • Available only from 6 April 1978 • Protects record for:- • main child benefit payees ( child under 16) • those looking after someone receiving specified benefits ( 35 + hours) • those receiving income support while looking after a sick /disabled person at home

  33. Home Responsibilities Protection • Cannot reduce qualifying years for full Basic State pension below 20*‘old terms’ • Cannot be given for years covered by reduced rate NI contribution election • From April 2002 ‘carers’ and people receiving child benefit for a child under 6 can build up State Second Pension too

  34. Home Responsibilities ProtectionSome examples Current Rules(Pre 6 April 2010)

  35. HRP 6 April 1978 Child born No HRP QY or HRP QY or HRP QY or HRP Woman with Full Rate NI liability at start of maternity leave

  36. HRP 6 April 1978 Child born No HRP No HRP No HRP QY or HRP QY or HRP QY or HRP Woman with reduced rate NI liability at start of maternity leave

  37. Home Responsibilities Protection An example (Pre April 2010): Left school at 16 and started working straightaway Married 5 years later Stopped working 3 years later for confinement (had two children) Returned to work when 42 (Full time)

  38. Home Responsibilities Protection Years in the ‘bank’? 8 years before confinement - 16 to 24 18 years from return to work to State Pension Age (60) - 42 to 60 26 years so qualifies for a Basic State Pension of 26 / 39 x £95.25?

  39. Home Responsibilities Protection 26 years plus HRP years from April 1978 till youngest reaches age 16 - say 9 years So qualifies for a Basic State Pension of 26 / (39 - 9) x £95.25

  40. Home Responsibilities Protection ‘new terms’ 26 years plus HRP years from April 1978 till youngest reaches age 16 - say 9 years So qualifies for a Basic State Pension of 26 + 9 / 30 x £95.25 So entitled to 100%

  41. Home Responsibilities Protection Another example (Pre April 2010): Stayed on to take ‘A’ levels At University for 3 years Married and worked for 5 years before starting a family Never returned to work

  42. Home Responsibilities Protection Years in the ‘bank’ 3 years - 16 to 18 University years - blank 5 years while working So appears not to qualify for any Basic State Pension as only 8 years in the ‘bank’

  43. Home Responsibilities Protection But…. 8 years plus HRP years from April 1978 till youngest reaches age 16 - say 15 years So qualifies for a Basic State Pension of 8 / (39 - 15) x £95.25

  44. Home Responsibilities Protection ‘new terms’ But…. 8 years plus HRP years from April 1978 till youngest reaches age 16 - say 15 years So qualifies for a Basic State Pension of 8 + 15 / 30 x £95.25

  45. Home Responsibilities Protection • Changes from 6 April 2010 • HRP replaced by new weekly credits – will not reduce the‘Qualifying Year’ target • Entitlement will be aligned with future credit counting until the child is 12* • HRP earned before 6 April 2010will be converted and HRP earnedafter the child’s 12th birthday willstill continue to count

  46. Divorced people • Can use ex-spouse’s contribution record if it produces a higher Basic State pension • Cannot use if re-marriage occurs before State Pension Age

  47. Widows / widowers • Entitlement to pension protected in a similar way to that of divorced people

  48. Pension forecast • Forecasts • Online • Telephone 0845 3000 168 • Submit form BR19 • Forecast will give details of • Basic State pension • SERPS / State Second Pension • Graduated pension • Will indicate if Basic State pension can be increased by paying NI for past or future periods

  49. Pension forecast / claim • If you have either live abroad or have worked overseas then contact the International Pension Centre for any claims • If you are living in any EEA country you should claimas follows:- • If you have worked in the country you are now living in thenclaim through the pension institution in that country • if you have not worked in the country you are now living in then claim your pension direct from the International Pension Centre