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Transition 101: Family Involvement

Transition 101: Family Involvement

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Transition 101: Family Involvement

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  1. Transition 101: Family Involvement • Type your name, email address, and zip code (along with all team members participating with you) in the ‘Chat Box’ on the left. • CCTS will conduct a sound check at 2:50 and 2:55. We’ll begin at 3:00 and end by 4:00. • Use the ‘Chat Box’ to type in questions and/or responses; we’ll address these mid-way through the webinar and during the last ten minutes. • After the webinar, you will receive a follow-up email requesting that you complete a quick survey. Thank you for joining us today!

  2. Transition 101: Family Involvementimproving post-school outcomes for students with disabilities in Washington State

  3. Center for Change In Transition Servicesimproving post-school outcomes for students with disabilities in Washington stateSeattle UniversityOSPI State Needs Project WELCOME to CCTS! cc This webinar is closed captioned. To see the captioning click on the cc icon just above the video.

  4. Website: www.seattleu.edu/ccts Email: ccts@seattleu.edu Phone: 206.296.6494 Center for Change In Transition Servicesimproving post-school outcomes for students with disabilities in Washington stateSeattle UniversityOSPI State Needs Project WELCOME to CCTS!

  5. Webinar Norms Raise your hand and wait to be called on by moderator If you have a microphone, please keep it turned off until called on. You may ask questions by typing in the chat box or by raising your hand (if you have a microphone).

  6. Quality Indicator Secondary Transition (QuIST) Click on red triangle

  7. Quality Indicators in Secondary Transition (QuIST) The QuIST is a multi-dimensional program evaluation process designed for district/Local Educational Agencies (LEA) teams to: Facilitate communication and sharing within and among the district and its interagency partners; Identify areas of strength and opportunities for improvement; Promote planning and improvement; Evaluate and measure progress.

  8. QuIST’s Five Domains • School-based Activities • Work-based Activities • System Support • Family Involvement • Connecting Activities

  9. QuIST’s Five Domains • School-based Activities • Work-based Activities • System Support • Family Involvement • Connecting Activities

  10. Family Involvement • Essential Question How can the family involvement quality indicators be incorporated while balancing the needs of each school or district?

  11. Family Involvement • What is Family Involvement? Family involvement serves to promote and support the social, emotional, physical, academic, and occupational growth of youth. Successful family involvement relies on meaningful collaboration among youth, families, schools, employers, and agencies. National Alliance for Secondary Education and Transition (www.nasetalliance.org)

  12. Agenda Parent and Family Training Family and School Communication Family and School Collaboration

  13. Transition Planning for Employment 34 CFR 300.320(b) - WAC 392-172A-03090(1)(j)(i) Transition assessment The ongoing process of collecting data on the individual’s needs, strengths, preferences, and interests as they relate to the demands of current and future working environments educational, living, personal and social environments.

  14. Transition Planning for Employment • Strengths: What strengths does the student have in meeting some of life’s demands as they relate to education/training, employment, and independent living? • Needs: What are the main barriers to the student reaching postsecondary endeavors (e.g., college/training program, a job/career, accessing the community, or living independently)? • Interests: What are the student’s interests, currently and in the future? What activities/experiences promote curiosity and catch their attention? • Preferences: Given the opportunity to choose from available options in the areas of education/training, employment, and independent living, what options, according to the student, will motivate the student and make him/her happiest?

  15. Family and School Collaboration

  16. Family and School Collaboration • School staff actively cultivates, encourages, and welcomes student and family involvement • Students and families are regular, active members of the IEP Team • Quality Indicators

  17. Family and School Collaboration Why Involve Families? • IDEA requires parent involvement (20 U.S.C. §300.322) • Must be invited to meetings and given copies of the IEP • Must be notified that the purpose of the meeting will be the consideration of the postsecondary goals and transition services • Students with one or more parents who participated in a greater percentage of IEP meetings during the 11th and 12th grade year were more likely to be engaged in post-school employment and to have stability in their employment status • *Fourqurean, J. M., Meisgeier, C., Swank, P. R., & Williams, R. E. (1991). Correlates of postsecondary employment outcomes for young adults with learning disabilities. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 24, 400-405.

  18. Family and School Collaboration Regular, Active, Team Members • How are parents involved in the IEP process? • What communication methods are the team members using? • Have you asked the parents, student and family how best to communicate with them, when and how often? • Are IEPs pre-filled prior to the meeting? • Is there communication with the parents prior to the meeting? • Do parents know some of the talking points in advance of the meeting?

  19. Family and School Collaboration • Students and parents are given the opportunity to provide information regarding the student’s postsecondary goals and transition services • Quality Indicators

  20. Family and School Collaboration Assessment and Postsecondary Goals • Parents know their child better than anyone else and will be the one constant factor in their child’s transition from school to adulthood • Valuable insights • Can help build skills outside classroom • Can assist in identifying needs, strengths, preferences, and interests • Transition Assessment Gathering Form

  21. Family and School Collaboration • School programs and activities are designed, implemented, and shaped by frequent feedback from students and families • Quality Indicators

  22. Family and School Collaboration Do youth and families have a variety of opportunities to participate in decision-making, governance, evaluation, and advisory committees at the school and community levels? • Collaboration

  23. Family and School Collaboration • Youth, families, and school staff jointly develop a family involvement policy and agreement outlining shared responsibility for improved student achievement and achieving the state’s high standards • School staff regularly share information about school improvement, policies, and performance data with youth and families in a variety of formats • Collaboration

  24. Family and School Collaboration • How can family and school collaboration be incorporated while balancing the needs of each school or district? Practical Application

  25. Family and School Communication

  26. Family and School Communication • Quality Indicators • School staff, families and students share frequent and timely reports of student behavior, performance, and achievement • School staff communicates with families while respecting the diversity of family cultures, traditions and values • Communication among families, students and school staff is respectful, collaborative and reciprocal in nature

  27. Family and School Collaboration Regular, Ongoing, Two-way Communication Communication among youth, families, and schools is flexible, reciprocal, meaningful, and individualized. • A variety of communication methods • Communication based on individual student and family needs that include alternate formats and languages as needed • Reports of positive student behavior and achievement National Alliance for Secondary Education and Transition (www.nasetalliance.org)

  28. Family and School Collaboration Seven Principles of Effective Partnerships Communication – communicate openly and honestly with families in a medium that is comfortable for them Professional Competence – ensure you are highly qualified in the area you are working in, continue to learn and grow, and have high expectations Respect – treat families with dignity, honor cultural diversity, and affirm strengths Turnbull, A. P., Turnbull, H. R., Erwin, E. J., Soodak, L. C., & Shogren, K. A. (2011). Families, professionals, and exceptionality: Positive outcomes through partnership and trust (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill/Prentice Hall.

  29. Family and School Collaboration Seven Principles of Effective Partnerships Commitment – be available, consistent, and go above and beyond Equality – recognize the strengths of every member of the team, share power, and work together Advocacy – focus on getting to the best solution for the student Trust – be reliable and act in the best interest of the student Turnbull, A. P., Turnbull, H. R., Erwin, E. J., Soodak, L. C., & Shogren, K. A. (2011). Families, professionals, and exceptionality: Positive outcomes through partnership and trust (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill/Prentice Hall.

  30. Family and School Collaboration • Culture • What goals are culturally appropriate and meaningful to the student and family? • Ask culturally relevant questions. • Consider other dimensions of culture (i.e., socioeconomic status, gender, religion, sexuality, age) that can impact transition planning. • Work with district for translation/interpreter services. • Recognize that cultural competence is a mindset and a practice, rather than a body of knowledge. Respecting Diversity Developed by Tracey Nix & Tiana Povenmire-Kirk and presented at DCDT 2012 Regional Conference

  31. Family and School Collaboration • Parent/Family Involvement • Invite parents/family and explain schools expectations about parent involvement. • Ask parents how and when they can be involved. • Identify alternative locations for IEP meetings. • Be willing to compromise with the family • Acknowledge and prepare to work around the huge shadow cast by issues of immigration status. Respecting Diversity Developed by Tracey Nix & Tiana Povenmire-Kirk and presented at DCDT 2012 Regional Conference

  32. Family and School Collaboration CLD Transition, Cont’d • Community • Visit the informal community networks upon which your families rely. • Develop relationships with community leaders & cultural figures to help you develop trust with students and families. Developed by Tracey Nix & Tiana Povenmire-Kirk and presented at DCDT 2012 Regional Conference

  33. Family and School Communication Practical Application • How can family and school communication be incorporated while balancing the needs of each school or district? • Ongoing two way communication that meets the needs of families • Short positive phone calls, emails or text messages • Divide and conquer • For every negative call make a positive call • Communicate with one student per class per day

  34. Parent and Family Training

  35. Parent and Family Training • Quality Indicators • School staff development includes training on student and family involvement processes, policies and procedures • How does administration encourage and support family involvement? • Is this district-wide? At the building level? • Does this include families from multiple cultures?

  36. Parent and Family Training • Quality Indicators • Students and parents are provided information regarding transition services, postsecondary training, employment and support services, and their role in the IEP/Transition Process • Parents receive training on informal assessment practices as related to their child’s strengths, needs, interests, and goals • There is a process in place to ensure that parents and students are informed of the requirements of IDEA 2004

  37. Parent and Family Training • Family Training • NSTTAC has identified family training in secondary transition as an evidence-based practice • Become familiar with resources on developing family-professional partnerships in secondary transition.

  38. Parent and Family Training • Family Training • Provide materials at the early stages of the Transition Process (before age 16) • Engage families in the conversation for transition planning in each school stage (elementary, middle, and high school) • Encourage parents to attend workshops on transition planning • Help families understand the need for high expectations

  39. Parent and Family Training Practical Application • How can the parent and family training be incorporated while balancing the needs of each school or district?

  40. Future Webinars Tune in on Wednesdays from 3 to 4 pm.

  41. Time for Feedback 1) Using the Chat Box, type in at least one tool or support CCTS provided that you found helpful and would like to use again. 2) Let us know at least one way CCTS can better support your team this year. 3) After the webinar, please respond to the quick survey sent to your email. Thank you for joining us today!

  42. CCTSContact www.seattleu.edu/ccts Email: ccts@seattleu.edu Phone: (206) 296-6494