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Blueprint for Physical Activity in the Waterloo Region. Healthy Communities by Design Presented by Dr. Mark Eys. Outline. Physical Activity Overview Random Physical Activity Statistics Waterloo Region Active Living Network Physical Activity Charter Physical Activity Action Plan.

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blueprint for physical activity in the waterloo region

Blueprint for Physical Activity inthe Waterloo Region

Healthy Communities by Design

Presented by Dr. Mark Eys

outline
Outline
  • Physical Activity Overview
  • Random Physical Activity Statistics
  • Waterloo Region Active Living Network
  • Physical Activity Charter
  • Physical Activity Action Plan
physical activity overview
Physical Activity Overview
  • ‘Physical activity’ is an umbrella term
    • describes a number of activities that require energy expenditures above what is normal when the body is at rest.
  • Physical activity is linked to a number of benefits
    • overall wellbeing, physical and mental health, prevents disease, improves social connectedness and quality of life, and provides economic benefits.
physical activity overview1
Physical Activity Overview
  • Physical activity guidelines (CSEP, 2011):
    • Children and Youth (5-17 years) =

60 minutes of moderate to vigorous intensity daily

    • Adults (18-64 years) =

150 minutes of moderate to vigorous intensity weekly

    • Older adults (> 65 years) =

150 minutes of moderate to vigorous intensity weekly

*inclusion of strength and flexibility

**more physical activity = more benefits

random physical activity statistics
Random Physical Activity Statistics
  • In Canada
    • The proportion of Canadian kids who play outside after school dropped 14% over the last decade
  • In Region of Waterloo
    • Only 22.3% of youth and 49.1% of adults are sufficiently active to achieve health benefits

(CFLRI, 2009)

random physical activity statistics1
Random Physical Activity Statistics
  • 2012 Grades (Active Healthy Kids Canada)
    • (F) on Physical Activity
    • (A-) on Proximity and availability of facilities, programs, parks, and playgrounds
    • (C) on Usage of facilities, programs, parks and playgrounds
random physical activity statistics2
Random Physical Activity Statistics
  • Canadian kids in Grades 6-12 are spending 7 hours and 48 minutes per day in front of screens.
    • When asked, 92% of Canadian children said they would choose playing with friends over watching TV.
    • Given the choice, 74% of Canadian kids in Grades 4 to 6 would choose to do something active after school.

(Active Healthy Kids Canada, 2012)

waterloo region active living network
Waterloo Region Active Living Network
  • A group of advocates and enthusiasts with a mission to “bring people together to encourage ACTIVE LIVING”:
    • To strengthen and create relationships among members of the community who promote active living
    • To increase accessibility to participate in physical activity
    • To advocate for creating environments conducive to active living
waterloo region active living network1
Waterloo Region Active Living Network
  • Steered by a committee with representatives from:
    • City of Kitchener and City of Cambridge
    • Waterloo Region Public Health
    • Ministry of Health and Long Term Care
    • WilfridLaurier University and Conestoga College
    • Waterloo Region District School Board and Waterloo Catholic District School Board
    • Opportunities Waterloo Region
    • Heart and Stroke Foundation
    • Interested citizens

In addition to more than 36 members at large

WEBSITE

waterloo region active living network2
Waterloo Region Active Living Network
  • One sub-committee of the WRALN is dedicated to advocating for policy changes regarding physical activity in the Waterloo region.
    • First meeting conducted on January 5th, 2011.
  • Spark Advocacy Grant from HSF in May 2011 to create a Physical Activity Charter for the Waterloo Region.
    • Review of existing charters (local, national, and international) and focus group discussions
exploration of municipal active living charter development and advocacy evans et al 2013
Exploration of Municipal Active Living Charter Development and Advocacy (Evans et al., 2013)

Active Living Charters =

Documents that provide a philosophical framework to guide efforts that promote the value of physical activity and establish policy to support active lifestyles

Purpose of study =

To establish a practical understanding of municipal active living charter development and implementation

exploration of municipal active living charter development and advocacy evans et al 20131
Exploration of Municipal Active Living Charter Development and Advocacy (Evans et al., 2013)

Methods=

Semi-structured interviews

1 male, 7 female contributors to municipal charters

City/town/rural Ontario

Target questions:

Circumstances leading to charter

Chronological stages of development

Key factors in the process

Reflection on charter outcomes

slide14

Regional Political Context Capacity

Capacity

Impetus for charter

Charter Development

Adoption Process

Political awareness

Policy

change

Charter Outcomes

Observable changes in community

Initiatives that build off of charter

Continued awareness and advocacy

Community awareness

Evaluation

toronto charter fo r physical activity
Toronto Charter for Physical Activity
  • International advocacy document developed by the International Society for Physical Activity and Health
    • Is the result of contributions from over 450 individuals/organizations from 55 countries representing all regions of the world.
    • See www.globalpa.org.uk for further information
toronto charter fo r physical activity1
Toronto Charter for Physical Activity

Guiding Principles:

To increase physical activity and decrease sedentary behaviour, countries and organizations are encouraged to…

[see sheet]

toronto charter fo r physical activity2
Toronto Charter for Physical Activity
  • Supports existing tools promoting active living within the region including:
    • Pedestrian Charter
    • Active and Safe Routes to School charter
    • Region of Waterloo's Active Transportation Master Plan
    • Active Transportation Master Plan
    • Regional Cycling Master Plan
    • Travel Wise
toronto charter fo r physical activity3
Toronto Charter for Physical Activity
  • Links directly with existing tools promoting active living within the region including:
    • Strategic objectives 4.2 and 4.7 Health and Inclusive Communities
    • Strategic objective 3.2 Sustainable Transportation

Region of Waterloo’s 2011-2014 Strategic Focus document

toronto charter fo r physical activity4
Toronto Charter for Physical Activity

Overall:

The charter provides a set of guidelines to consider when developing policies and initiatives at our local level.

It is an overt statement of the importance of physical activity for our citizens.

But…how to make the charter a living document?

toronto charter fo r physical activity5
Toronto Charter for Physical Activity

Community consultations on charter:

  • CCORIC (Community Coalition on Refugee and Immigrant Concerns)
  • Public Health managers and planners
  • Board of Education
  • Sports and recreation staff
  • Neighbourhood communities

There is a need to develop a blueprint for action specific to the region

toronto charter fo r physical activity6
Toronto Charter for Physical Activity
  • As a result of this work we took this charter to the council members of the Waterloo Region to ask them to:
    • Support the guiding principles of the Toronto Charter for Physical Activity
    • Provide guidance and support for the WRALN to develop a blue print for action on physical activity

See handout

toronto charter fo r physical activity7
Toronto Charter for Physical Activity
  • Charter was positively received but council members wanted specific details on how this charter will be implemented (i.e., Blue Print for Action)
the development of a blue print for action
The Development of a Blue Print for Action

Part A:

  • A review of policy recommendations from:
    • The Waterloo Region Healthy Communities Partnership
    • Long (2012) report on Supporting Advocacy on Municipal Official Plans [Active Living Section]

Part B:

  • Conduct focus groups with community members
part a r eview of current policy recommendations

The Development of a Blue Print for Action

Part A: Review of current policy recommendations

Report by Long (2012) identified a number of specific projects/policies currently adopted by the Region.

For example:

  • Project health
  • Active Cambridge
  • Recreation and Leisure Services Masterplan
part a r eview of current policy recommendations1

The Development of a Blue Print for Action

Part A: Review of current policy recommendations

Report by Long (2012) identified a number of specific projects/policies currently adopted by the Region.

  • Pedestrian linkages
  • Active and passage recreation opportunities
  • Accessible recreation opportunities
  • Active transport
part b gathering information from key stakeholders

The Development of a Blue Print for Action

Part B: Gathering information from key stakeholders

Purpose: to establish a greater understanding of community perceptions regarding physical activity barriers, opportunities, and promotion in Waterloo Region.

slide27

The Development of a Blue Print for Action

  • Developed a semi-structured focus group guide to explore the key questions at hand:
    • Physical activity opportunities (e.g., Can you please describe what types of physical activity you engage in?)
    • Physical activity access (e.g., Can you please describe any barriers to engaging in physical activity?)
    • Physical activity promotion (e.g., What are some potential ways that we could better educate you about the available opportunities in the area?)
slide28

The Development of a Blue Print for Action

  • Identified priority populations to engage in focus group discussions
    • Youth (12-16; 17-20)
    • Older Adults
    • New Canadians
    • University students
    • Educators
    • Members of the private fitness industry
    • Individuals with disabilities
    • Sport council members
    • Neighborhood associations
slide29

The Development of a Blue Print for Action

  • Identified priority populations to engage in focus group discussions
    • Youth (12-16; 17-20)
    • Older Adults
    • New Canadians
    • University students
    • Educators
    • Members of the private fitness industry
    • Individuals with disabilities
    • Sport council members
    • Neighborhood associations
slide30

The Development of a Blue Print for Action

  • Eight focus groups conducted thus far
    • 46 community members
    • Ranged from 30 to 60 minutes in length
  • Digitally audio-recorded
  • All interview transcripts were transcribed verbatim
  • Analyzed for emergent themes (i.e., core consistencies among participants’ responses)
preliminary findings
Preliminary Findings

S

H

A

P

E

haring

elping

ccessing

artnering

ducating

preliminary findings1
Preliminary Findings

Sharing

It’s basically communicated through the word of mouth and it’s not really pushed. I would like to see events being promoted, sometimes the media could be a huge help. A lot of people listen to the radio, and I think there’s a big interest in physical activity.

Helping

The cost is also a big issue, I know that all those YMCA and all those other places you still have to pay. For a family of five or six, everything adds up and it’s not so easy to belong to a club or belong to anything.

Accessing

Partnering

Educating

preliminary findings2
Preliminary Findings

So say you’re from Ontario works, you can join the Y they look at your financials and income and you can join for say 2 bucks a month.

Sharing

Helping

The thing is my day job is teaching at risk youth and the first thing they do when they come in is march them next door to the Y so that they can join.

Anybody can join, the Y is a charity group, it’s a nonprofit charity and anyone can join. I’ll tell you first-hand having worked there for many many years, it makes a huge difference. So there’s your buy in for this, folks that can’t afford to join a gym

Accessing

Partnering

Educating

preliminary findings3
Preliminary Findings

I think one of the main things are the walking tracks at the Activa recreation complex. That’s accessible and it’s free,

Sharing

but I think we

need to be a bit more purposeful on how we promote that to people.

Helping

How we can connect some of the different groups of people that might see themselves as belonging together, or wanting to belong together. Whether that be new moms, cultural groups, kids, disease focused, something that people can say, yes that’s for me. I think almost anybody can walk, and it’s free, and you can do it at any time of the year.You can start it in the winter and there’s all kind of trails around. You can do some really fun things but make it social too.

Accessing

Partnering

Educating

preliminary findings4
Preliminary Findings

I think parents are looking for that physical activity, but they also maybe don’t know where to look, like where to go. I’ve been asked by new families, new families to the community, what do you know about?

Sharing

Helping

I share what I know but I certainly know there’s plenty of resources out there that I’m not familiar with… I didn’t grow up here experiencing those, so that would be a barrier for me in being able to share that information.

Accessing

Partnering

Educating

summary
Summary
  • Inactivity and obesity are major social issues
    • Continual ‘F’ grade on activity levels
  • WRALN focused on advocating for physical activity
  • Charter for physical activity only a starting point
  • Moving forward:
    • There are a number of well-established opportunities for physical activity in the region
    • Initial ‘blueprint’ findings indicate that rather than additional physical resources, greater co-ordination is needed to effectively serve the region