slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
A “Not-A” Bee PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
A “Not-A” Bee

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 45

A “Not-A” Bee - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 124 Views
  • Uploaded on

Biology & Habitats of Native Bees Natural Resources Conservation Service, 20 August 2009 Robbin Thorp, UC Davis. A “Not-A” Bee. Another “Not-A” Bee A Sphecid Wasp (“You are what you eat”). A Bee The European Honey Bee, Apis mellifera. Honey bee on almond. What are Bees (Apoidea)?.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'A “Not-A” Bee' - herbst


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1
Biology & Habitats of Native BeesNatural Resources Conservation Service, 20 August 2009Robbin Thorp, UC Davis
what are bees apoidea
What are Bees (Apoidea)?
  • Derived wasps that use pollen (not animal) protein to feed their young
  • They use nectar as flight fuel
  • They have branched hairs, and other adaptations for obtaining food from flowers
  • They provide an important ecological service to flowering plants: Pollination
  • Many are pollen specialists (oligoleges)
what are bees apoidea1
What are Bees (Apoidea)?
  • There are over 19,500 species (ca 20-30K)
    • More diversity than all Mammals + Birds +Reptiles + Amphibians summed together.
  • Greatest diversity is in warm dry areas not wet tropics
  • About 75% are solitary
  • About 15% are cuckoos
  • About 10% are social
bee tongues forked bifid
Bee Tongues Forked (Bifid)
  • Plasterer bees have bifid tongue like wasp relatives
  • Adaptation for brood cell construction used to spread cellophane-like polymer lining
bee tongues short tongued bee
Bee TonguesShort Tongued Bee
  • Mining bee
  • Short pointed glossa
bee tongues long tongued
Bee TonguesLong Tongued
  • Orchid bee
    • Elongate tongue longer than body
pollen transport structures scopa brush of hairs
Pollen Transport StructuresScopa (Brush of hairs)
  • Mining Bee
    • Most of hind leg plus sides of thorax
  • Digger Bee
    • Only outer hind leg
pollen transport structures pollen moistened
Pollen Transport StructuresPollen Moistened
  • Mining bee
    • Scopa sparse
  • Bumble bee
    • Corbiculum (concave plate on hind leg)
pollen transport structures scopa abdominal
Pollen Transport StructuresScopa: Abdominal
  • Leafcutting bee
    • Bum-up position
bee diversity mining bees
Bee DiversityMining Bees
  • Mining Bees
    • Female
    • Male
    • Sexual dimorphism
    • Haplodiploidy
bee diversity mining bees1
Bee DiversityMining Bees
  • Mining Bee
    • Female
    • Specialist on Sky Blue (Oligolege)
    • Unnamed species
bee diversity sweat bees
Bee DiversitySweat Bees
  • Sweat Bee
    • Female
  • Sweat Bee
    • Male
bee diversity sweat bees1
Bee DiversitySweat Bees
  • Green Sweat Bee
    • Female
  • Green Sweat Bee
    • Male
bee diversity leafcutting mason bees
Bee DiversityLeafcutting & Mason Bees
  • Leafcutting Bee
    • Female collecting pollen
  • Leafcutting Bee
    • Female cutting leaf
bee diversity leafcutting mason bees1
Bee DiversityLeafcutting & Mason Bees
  • Mason Bee
    • Female
  • Cotton Bee
    • Male
bee diversity digger cuckoo corbiculate bees
Bee DiversityDigger, Cuckoo, & Corbiculate Bees
  • Cuckoo Bee
    • Female
  • Cuckoo Bee
    • Female
bee diversity digger cuckoo corbiculate bees1
Bee DiversityDigger, Cuckoo, & Corbiculate Bees
  • Sunflower Bee
    • Female (Specialist)
  • Squash Bee
    • Female (Specialist)
bee diversity digger cuckoo corbiculate bees2
Bee DiversityDigger, Cuckoo, & Corbiculate Bees
  • Carpenter Bee
    • Female
  • Small Carpenter Bee
    • Female
bee diversity digger cuckoo corbiculate bees3
Bee DiversityDigger, Cuckoo, & Corbiculate Bees
  • Yellow Face Bumble Bee
    • Queen
  • Orchid Bee
    • Male
    • with orchid pollinia
bee diversity digger cuckoo corbiculate bees4
Bee DiversityDigger, Cuckoo, & Corbiculate Bees
  • European Honey Bee
    • Worker
  • Stingless Bee
    • Worker
habitat requirements
Habitat Requirements
  • In addition to food from flowers, bees need habitats for their nests
  • Most are solitary soil nesters
    • Sand, clay, sandstone, rock
    • Flat ground, birms, vertical cliffs
    • Many have specialized habitat requirements
  • Many are tubular cavity nesters
    • E. g., beetle tunnels, hollow stems
  • Some excavate their own burrows in wood or pith
  • Some social bees use large cavities
life cycle of solitary bees
Life Cycle of Solitary Bees
  • Female Mining Bee on Goldfields flower head in spring
  • This bee specializes on Goldfields for pollen (Oligolecty)
life cycle of solitary bees1
Life Cycle of Solitary Bees
  • Nest entrance:
    • open with tumulus (excavated soil) surrounding it.
  • Nest architecture:
    • Vertical entry shaft
    • Lateral tunnels
    • Brood cells:
    • 1) Completed with egg
    • 2) Under construction
life cycle of solitary bees2
Life Cycle of Solitary Bees
  • Brood cell with food mass being formed
  • Brood cell with food mass completed and egg laid on surface
life cycle of solitary bees3
Life Cycle of Solitary Bees
  • Cap of brood cell (inner view)
  • Early larva ready to initiate feeding on pollen provisions
life cycle of solitary bees4
Life Cycle of Solitary Bees
  • Post-feeding larva (summer phase)
  • Pupa (autumnal phase)
life cycle of solitary bees5
Life Cycle of Solitary Bees
  • Early spring bloom of Goldfields and Yellow Carpet at Jepson Prairie Reserve
  • Female Mining bee on pollen host, Goldfields
  • Synchronized annual cycles
  • www.vernalpools.org/Thorp/
bee nests
Bee Nests
  • Alkali Bee
    • Female on alfalfa
    • Aggregated nest site
    • Tumuli
bee nests1
Bee Nests
  • Alkali Bee
    • Brood cell
    • Pollen provisions with egg on top
bee nests2
Bee Nests
  • Alkali Bee
    • Post feeding larvae
    • Pupa
bee nests3
Bee Nests
  • Alkali Bee
    • Artificial bee bed
    • Road sign to protect bees from becoming road kill
bee nests4
Bee Nests
  • Alfalfa Leafcutting Bee
    • Female collecting pollen from alfalfa
    • Female cutting leaf
bee nests5
Bee Nests
  • Alfalfa Leafcutting Bee
    • Cavity nester
    • Field domicile with bee boards
  • Female into nest with leaf piece
bee nests6
Bee Nests
  • Alfalfa Leafcutting Bee
    • Female in with pollen
  • Female laying egg on pollen provision
bee nests7
Bee Nests
  • Alfalfa Leafcutting Bee
    • Brood cells with pollen provisions, egg, larvae
  • Fully developed larvae in cocoons
bee nests mason bee
Bee NestsMason Bee
  • Blue Orchard Bee (BOB) female on almond flower
  • Drilled hole with mud partitions, pollen, and larvae
bee nests8
Bee Nests
  • Bumble Bee
    • Corbiculate Bees
    • Annual societies
    • Queen emerging from hibernation
  • Incipient nest
    • Honey pot
    • Initial brood
    • Incubated by queen
bee nests9
Bee Nests
  • Bumble Bees
    • Nest with eggs, pupa, cocoons
  • Nest overview
    • Egg cups, cocoons
    • Eggs, larvae, pupae
    • Nectar storage in old cocoons
bee nests10
Bee Nests
  • Bumble Bees
    • Mating male/queen
  • Queens entering into hibernation
conclusions
Conclusions
  • Other bees may be suited for management
  • Unmanaged populations provide valuable services for crop and wildland plants.
  • Knowledge about biology and habitat needs of native bees provides keys to managing them and their habitats.