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Interactive Innovations: Literacy the Essence of Learning. Fred Renihan Simon Fraser University, British Columbia. Developing a Framework for our Provincial Conversation. Providing learning in a continuum from rural to urban context. Connecting curriculum, instruction and assessment.

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slide1

Interactive Innovations:

Literacy the Essence of Learning

Fred Renihan

Simon Fraser University,

British Columbia

slide2

Developing a Framework for our Provincial Conversation

Providing learning in a continuum from rural to urban context

Connecting curriculum, instruction and assessment

Literacy

Early Learning

Compelling learning is constructed in community; powerful communities connect learning; and the most successful communities extend their learning into the future

Secondary Learners

Extending community connections

Equitable Futures

Creating healthy environments

Shared Leadership

Using technology as an invisible, seamless support

slide3

Examinerby Frank Scott

The routine trickery of the examination

Baffles these hot and discouraged youths

Driven by who knows what external pressure

They pour their hated self analysis through the nib of confession

On to the accusatory page

I who have plotted their immediate downfall

I am entrusted with the divine categories

ABCD and the hell of E

The parade of prize and the backdoor of pass

slide4

Examiner cont.’by Frank Scott

In the tight silence standing by a green grass window

I watch the fertile earth graduate its sons with more compassion

Not commanding the shape of stem and stamen

Bringing the trees to pass with increase of sunlight

Or decrease of rain

But for each seed the whole soil

For the inner life the environment receptive and contributory

slide5

Examiner cont.’

by Frank Scott

I shudder at the narrow frames of our text book schools

In which we plant our so various seedlings

Each brick-walled barracks cut into numbered room

Black-boarded, ties the venturing shoot to the master’s stick

Shapes the new to the old in the ashen garden

Shall we open the whole skylight of thought to these tiptoe minds

Shall we give them the frontier worlds of literature

And to the fields of art for their realms of growth

slide6

Examiner cont.’

by Frank Scott

Or shall we pass them the chosen poems with the footnotes

Ring the bell on their thoughts period their play

Make laws for averages and plans for means

Print one history book for the whole province

And let ninety thousand reach page ten by Tuesday

As I gather the inadequate paper evidence

I hear across the neat campus lawn

The professional mower’s drone

Clipping the inch high green

slide7

Stewardship: What Influences Learning?

Wang, Haertal and Walberg (1994) in a meta-analysis of 11,000 statistical findings over the past 50 years of research, identified the following as the most powerful influences on student learning:

  • Classroom management 64.8*
  • 2. Meta-cognitive processes 63.0
  • 3. Cognitive processes 61.3
  • 4. Home environment/parental support 58.4
  • Student-teacher social interactions 56.7
  • 6.Social / behavioural attributes 5.2
slide8

Stewardship: What Influences Learning? cont.’

  • 7. Motivational affective attributes 54.8
  • Peer group 53.0
  • 26. State-level policies 37.0
  • 27. School policies 36.5
  • 28. District demographics 32.9
  • *M.C., Haertel, G.D., & Walberg, H.J. (December 1993). Leadership.
  • Scores from several sources standardized then weighed according to effect sizes ratings and content analyses.
slide9

Interaction in Teaching and Learning:

The Research

  • The Learner:
  • recognizes need to learn
  • is motivated to succeed
  • is interested in topic
  • finds instruction useful
  • sees personal relevance
  • is secure in environment
  • The Teacher:
  • prepared
  • directs instruction
  • high expectations
  • consistent feedback
  • caring
  • positive
  • The Task:
  • is achievable
  • can be broken into manageable units
  • is useful and relevant
  • is dynamic not passive
  • is challenging
slide10

Teacher-Learner Reciprocity

There is an urgent need for reciprocity in our schools and classrooms.

Without such reciprocity, without some form of mutual emotional satisfaction between teacher and taught, the curriculum remains simply an idea in the mind of the teacher –

it lacks relevance even though the teacher teaches and the students go through the motions of scholarship activity.

Michael Marland

slide11

Learning Conditions

MEMBERSHIP:

Preconditions for School Membership:

  • Attachment
  • Commitment
  • Involvement
  • Belief in school norms
slide12

Learning Conditions

MEMBERSHIP:

  • School’s Commitment to Membership:
  • Positive, respectful and caring environment
  • Strong communication
  • Active assistance in helping students meet school standards
  • Active help in assisting students make the link between school and society
  • Attachment to and positive relationships with adult professional role models outside of formal classroom interaction
slide13

Learning Conditions

ENGAGEMENT:

Includes all of those actions and interactions which enable students to become focused on academic pursuit

slide14

Learning Conditions

ENGAGEMENT:

Preconditions for school engagement:

  • Strong academic focus
  • Commitment to improved student learning
  • Commitment to results
  • Commitment to evaluation
slide15

Learning Conditions

ENGAGEMENT:

Impediments to educational engagement:

  • Non-motivating course work and instruction
  • Dissonance between learning and
  • teaching styles
  • Unremitting preoccupation with course coverage
slide16

Equitable Futures

ACHIEVEMENT FOR ALL

What one child can learn, any child can learn providing attention is given to necessary preconditions for learning.

Benjamin Bloom

slide17

Learning Theory and Technology:

  • Although the schools are embedded in our culture and reflect its values, the technological changes that have swept through society at large have left the educational system largely unchanged
  • In the course of 20 years, a dramatic rift has opened between the process of teaching and learning in the schools and the ways of obtaining knowledge in society at large
slide18

Learning Theory and Technology cont.’

  • The result is an escalating estrangement of the schools from society, and from the children who live in it
  • The earliest uses of computers based their instructional models on the work of behaviourists such as B.F. Skinner. Computers were able to provide drill and practice on previously learned skills
  • Strommen (1992)
slide19

A Community of Leaders

by A. Strombe

One hot summer day, while lying in my yard on my back

With only the drone of some distant train on some far off track

I saw a sight which to this day I had never seen

Anything quite like before

At about five thousand feet, the leader of the V

The head goose, suddenly veered out to the right

His space was immediately filled by the goose directly behind

The formation kept growing wider

Until he found a place at the back of the line

They didn’t even miss a beat

slide20

A Community of Leaders cont.’

by A. Strombe

So that’s how I found out how the goose can fly

From way down south to way up north and back again

But he cannot do it alone you see

That is something he can only do in community

It’s a wonderful notion and people swell with emotion and pride

To think of themselves on the eagle’s side

Solitary, self-sufficient and strong

But we are what we are

That is something that we cannot choose

And though many would like to be seen as the eagle

I think that God made us more like the goose.

slide21

Staff Development

Stages of Development and Degree of Positive Transfer

  • Awareness / Information 10%
  • 2. Demonstration / Modeling 10%
  • 3. Practice / Feedback 20%
  • 4. Peer Coaching in the Classroom 70 – 80%
  • adapted from Joyce and Showers (1982)
slide22

Cornerstones of Support

Six indicators of collaboration:

  • Teachers sharing in frequent, continuous
  • and precise talk about teaching practices
  • Frequent observations of teachers together
  • with detailed and candid critiques of their
  • teaching
  • Teachers planning, designing, preparing
  • and evaluating teaching materials together
slide23

Cornerstones of Support

Six indicators of collaboration cont.’

  • Teachers teaching each other the
  • practice of teaching
  • Norms of collegiality which are prevalent
  • in the school
  • A norm of continuous improvement
    • J. Little (1982)
slide24

Reflective Questions

  • How can we clarify and communicate the purpose, vision and values of our schools and school district?
  • How can we initiate, implement and sustain a successful change process?
  • How can we provide strong leadership at the same time that we empower those closest to the action?
  • How can we shape organizational culture and provide structures that support the culture we seek?
slide25

Reflective Questions cont.’

5.How can we widen the circle of responsible actors in our drive to keep learners at the center?

6. How can we create collaborative processes that will result in individual, group and organizational learning?

7. How can we foster an environment that is results oriented yet encourages experimentation?

slide26

Teacher

by Rabbi Zev Shostak

I am that most fortunate of men for I am eternal

Some people live in the world of today.

I live in the world of tomorrow

Some feel meaning in the temporal and transient

I find purpose in the eternal and the enduring and the eternal

For I am charged with that most sacred of missions

To transmit all that our parents lived for and loved for and died for to the next generation

slide27

Teacher cont.’

by Rabbi Zev Shostak

I span the generations

Making the wisdom of the past live now so that the future will have meaning

I make wisdom live

For I am no mere bearer of knowledge

I do not simply teach the mind -- I reach the heart

And when I reach the heart I touch the soul.

slide28

Teacher cont.’

by Rabbi Zev Shostak

To those who say two generations hence what shall I be if but a distant memory, I respond:

Though the mind fades, memories linger

Though the body fails, the spirit prevails

Though the scroll burns the letters dance in the air.

slide29

Developing a Framework for our Provincial Conversation

Providing learning in a continuum from rural to urban context

Connecting curriculum, instruction and assessment

Literacy

Early Learning

Compelling learning is constructed in community; powerful communities connect learning; and the most successful communities extend their learning into the future

Extending community connections

Secondary Learners

Equitable Futures

Creating healthy environments

Shared Leadership

Using technology as an invisible, seamless support