Setting, Characters and Characterization - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Setting, Characters and Characterization

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  1. Setting, Characters and Characterization

  2. What is setting? • The setting of a literary work is the time and place of the action • It includes all the details of a place and time • The year, • Time of day • Even the weather • The place may be a: • Specific country • State • Neighborhood • Institution • Home

  3. How do we determine setting? • Writers often use Details to establish setting. Such as • Dialect ( how people speak based on where they are from) • Clothing • Customs • Modes of transportation

  4. What affect does the setting have? • Setting serves as a backdrop– a context in which the characters interact • It can also help create a feeling, or atmosphere—mood and tone

  5. In your notes. . . • Using a specific quote from the book, choose one setting from TCAN and illustrate it in the box on your page. • Put the quote on the line along with the page # • Draw your illustration with as much detail as Burch included

  6. Character types • A character can be one or more of these: • Round (major) • Flat (minor) • Dynamic • Static • Stereotypical • Protagonist • Antagonist

  7. Round Character • Round characters are very complex. • They have a fully developed personality that exhibits many varied traits • Both virtues and faults • These characters are necessary to understand the story –MAJOR CHARACTERS

  8. Flat Character • One dimensional • Do not have a developed personality • One sided and often very stereotypical • used as a representation of a group based on racial, social, religioius , sexist or ethnic prejudice. • However, they are necessary for moving the action along in a story—MINOR CHARACTERS

  9. Dynamic VS Static Characters • Dynamic Characters • Undergo some change in the story • For better or for worse • Static Characters • Remain unchanged throughout the story

  10. Protagonist Vs. Antagonist • Protagonist is the main character who “drives the action” of the story • Often hero • Often most important character • Antagonist is an adversary who opposes the main character in an attempt to keep him/her from his/her goal • Can be anyone in conflict with the protagonist • Usually the villain or bad guy

  11. On your page. . . • List the characters we have meet or discussed so far in TCAN • Identify the types of characters each may be,

  12. Direct Vs. Indirect Characterization • Direct • The author describes the character directly • Info can be pulled right off the page • Indirect • The author depends on the reader to draw conclusions about the character’s traits • Author tells what other participants in the story say and think or what the character is doing and the reader must draw his/her own conclusion about traits based from this info.

  13. On your page. . . • Think about what you know about Jennings. . . • Appereance • Attitude • Loyalty to family, friends • What comes directly from the author (DC), and what doe you draw conclusions about based on his actions and other characters interactions with him (IDC)? • In your character list from earlier, write these traits and label how these traits where relayed.