slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Change PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Change

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 16

Change - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 151 Views
  • Updated on

Change. Effecting Change by Funding Competitive Grants: Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education. Robert L. Newhall Western SARE Deputy Coordinator. What is Sustainable Agriculture ?. Satisfy human food and fiber needs;

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

Change


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. Change

    2. Effecting Change by Funding Competitive Grants: Sustainable AgricultureResearch and Education Robert L. NewhallWestern SARE Deputy Coordinator

    3. What is Sustainable Agriculture? • Satisfy human food and fiber needs; • Enhance environmental quality and the natural resource base upon which the agricultural economy depends; • Make the most efficient use of nonrenewable resources and on-farm resources and integrate, where appropriate, natural biological cycles and controls; • Sustain the economic viability of farm operations; and • Enhance the quality of life for farmers and society as a whole

    4. In short, Sustainable Agriculture is: • Economically Viable...If it is not profitable, it is not sustainable... • Socially Acceptable...The Quality of Life of Farmers, Farm Families and Farm Communities is important... • Ecologically Sound...We must preserve the resource base that sustains us all...

    5. Western SARE Program • A program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture – National Institute of Food and Agriculture that promotes profitable farms, a sound environment and vibrant communities through offering different types of grants opportunities: • Farmer/Rancher Grants • Professional + Producer Grants • Research and Education Grants • Professional Development Grants • Graduate Student Grants

    6. Farmer/Rancher Grants • How much? Up to $15,000 (1 producer) or $25,000 (3+ producers) • How long? One to three years • How does the money flow? 50% upon contracting & 50% upon completion & accepted final report • Must include a Technical Advisor (Extension, NRCS, SCD, etc.) • Technical Review – January • AC approves funding – March • Contracting – starts spring

    7. Professional + Producers Grants • How much? Up to $50,000 • How long? One to three years) • How does the money flow? Cost-Reimbursable • Must have five or more producers signed on • Technical Review – January • AC approves funding – March • Contracting – starts spring

    8. Research & Education Cooperative Projects • How much? Upper limit around $250,000 • How long? One to three years: potential for competitive renewal • How does the money flow? Cost-Reimbursable • Must have three producers involved • Pre-proposal Technical Review – July • AC approves those to submit full proposals – August • Full proposal Technical Review – January • AC approves funding – March • Contracting – starts spring

    9. Professional Development Program • How much? Up to $75,000 • How long? One to three years • How does the money flow? Cost-Reimbursable) • Train-the-trainer grants for Professional Development • Technical Review – January • AC approves funding – March • Contracting – starts spring

    10. Graduate Student Grants • How much? Up to $25,000 • How long? One to two years • How does the money flow? Cost-Reimbursable • Need to be working on Masters or PhD • Technical Review – July • AC approves funding – August • Contracting – fall

    11. When writing a Western SARE grant: • Points to Remember: • Read the Call for Proposals (CFP) • Read the CFP again – several times • Tie your idea into what Western SARE wants • Always make sure to have the proposal in by • the required time/date

    12. Common reviewer critiques • The proposal failed to address SARE goals • The proposal and plan of action lacked focus; not clear what you intended to do • Large amount of dollars paying for personnel • The education & outreach plan is weak • Crops to be grown are not specified • Did not follow directions specified by the CFP

    13. Common reviewer critiques • It would be helpful to have a control plot • There was little information about how this project would benefit other producers • Lots of unanswered questions; not sure what they’re going to do • The funding seems more for perpetuating an organization than developing a project • Not much going to producer education

    14. Common reviewer praise • Creative • Well-written • Large potential and measurable impact • Very innovative approach • Good use of technical advisor • Good proposal with specific goals • Lots of producers involved and educated

    15. Common reviewer praise • Good outreach with field days, fliers, pamphlets and web-based materials • The budget fit well and is carefully planned • Good study design • It proposes good measurable outcomes • The systems approach is a good one • Good ‘on-the-ground’ testing

    16. Budgets • Create a realistic budget • Budgets that overstate estimated expenses raise red flags with reviewers • A budget that bumps up against the maximum allowed can also wave a red flag • Read the specific budgetary requirements carefully and address them