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Open Source Blogging Software Michelle Murrain, NOSI June 24, 2008 PowerPoint Presentation
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Open Source Blogging Software Michelle Murrain, NOSI June 24, 2008

Open Source Blogging Software Michelle Murrain, NOSI June 24, 2008

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Open Source Blogging Software Michelle Murrain, NOSI June 24, 2008

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  1. Open Source Blogging Software Michelle Murrain, NOSI June 24, 2008

  2. What we'll cover today • What is blogging? • Options for creating a blog • CMS vs. Blogging tool • Drupal & Joomla CMS and Blogging • MovableType • WordPress • WordPress case study

  3. What is blogging? • Regularly updated news, opinion or journaling • Often read by RSS feed • Usually (but not always) allows comments • Used to engage constituents • Can have one, or multiple authors

  4. Options for creating a blog • Software as a Service, such as: • Blogger.com • Free • LiveJournal • Both free and paid versions • Wordpress.com • Free, and very cheap paid versions • TypePad.com • Ranges in price • Blogware • Sold only through resellers

  5. Options for creating a blog • Open Source Blogging tools • WordPress • MovableType • B2evolution • Open Source CMS tools • Drupal • Joomla • Others • Many (not all) have blogs as a part of the integrated CMS package • Some (like Plone) require add-on tools • Proprietary Blog/CMS tools • Build your own Don't ever do this!

  6. CMS or Blog? • CMS – Content Management System: designed to manage an entire website • Blogging tool – just designed to manage a blog • If you already have a CMS, and want to add a blog: • If the CMS is capable, or there is a strong add-on, this is a good option • A standalone blog tool has advantages/disadvantages: • Different authentication • Designed to be only a blog – strong blogging plug ins, etc. • Blog, not CMS workflow • Different template

  7. CMS or Blog? • Using a blogging tool for a CMS is not recommended. • Not designed as a CMS • Provides real limitations • You'll be sorry later

  8. Drupal Blog • A blog in Drupal is a module • Authenticated users may, or may not, have access to the blog module, depending on what group they are in • Blog is directly connected to an individual user • Comments are built in

  9. Joomla • Blog is a content category • Comments are not out-of-the-box – you need to add a plug in to deal with blog comments

  10. Movable Type • Used to be proprietary (there are still proprietary versions)‏ • Now GPL v2 • MT is what powers TypePad • Very professional, high end

  11. WordPress (and Wordpress.com)‏ • “Industry Standard” • Very easy to set up and use • Many hosting companies have “one click” installation • Wordpress.com very easy to set up • Even without that, it is quite easy to install • Very intuitive interface • Designed just for blogging • Multiple authors and roles • Subscriber, contributor, author, editor, administrator • Link management (for blogrolls)‏ • Comment management/moderation • RSS feeds for entries and comments

  12. WordPress • Lots of templates available • Lots of plug ins • Undergoing a lot of development – it has improved greatly over the years • WordPress MU (μ)‏ • Multi-user – basically make your own wordpress.com

  13. DEMO

  14. Word Press Case Study • The AAUW (American Association of University Women) launched a blog in February 2008 • Peggy Woods-Clark • Website Manager • Holly Kearl • AAUW Legal Advocacy Fund Manager