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AEB 3174 Change and and Social Justice in Early Childhood Session 4 Cultural Diversity and family structure a capacity building approach. Lecturers: Lidia Hall and Christine Cook. Cultural Diversity and family structure a capacity building approach.

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Lecturers lidia hall and christine cook

AEB 3174 Change and and Social Justice in Early ChildhoodSession 4 Cultural Diversity and family structurea capacity building approach

Lecturers: Lidia Hall and

Christine Cook


Cultural diversity and family structure a capacity building approach
Cultural Diversity and family structurea capacity building approach

This lecture will examine how you can provide a positive learning environment for all children and families in your service by:

  • Acknowledging the cultural and linguistic diversity in your groups

  • Recognising “unfair” behaviour

  • Developing programs which actively address discrimination and promote a “fair go” for all children and their families


What is cultural diversity
What is cultural diversity?

  • We normally think of different ethnic groups

  • What else defines culture?


Cultural diversity includes
Cultural Diversity includes:

  • Family composition

  • Values

  • Religion

  • Education level

  • Employment

  • SE background

  • City, regional, country

  • Newly arrived immigrants and established

  • Neighbourhood

  • What about the stereotypes about these different cultural groups?

  • How do they affect the developing child’s self image and sense of belonging?


In terms of family diversity
In terms of family diversity:

  • How would you welcome same sex families into the centre.

  • How would you positively acknowledge this child’s family structure within the program

  • What about traditions like mothers day and fathers day. Are they habits or best practice? How can they be changed modified to respect all families?

Which early childhood policies and frameworks support social inclusion?


What if
What if...

  • The child today is devalued, overlooked, excluded, expected to blend in?

  • Can we be surprised at the increasing levels of disengaged youth tomorrow?

  • What is your role as a just Early Childhood educator in scaffolding the development of pro-social behaviour, respect for diversity and resilience for all children?


Youth at risk the facts
YOUTH AT RISK: THE FACTS

35,895 children are placed in Out of Home Care each year in Australia.

There are 46, 187 substantiated Child Protection reports each year in Australia.

There are an estimated 32,400 young people between 12 to 24 years who are homeless in Australia.

Young People with Child Protection involvement are overrepresented in Youth Justice and Homelessness statistics.

Indigenous people account for around 5% of young people, but are over-represented in Youth Justice and Homelessness statistics.

Whitelion and OFA estimate that there are nearly 50,000 vulnerable young people in Australia and nearly 15,000 at high risk.

Homelessness is the most extreme form of poverty – 10% of Australians live in poverty, mainly Indigenous people, long term unemployed and single parent families.

A young person is defined by the Australian Government as someone aged 12-24. OFA and Whitelion will work with young people aged 10-25 (and older in special circumstances).

14,545 young people are in contact with the Youth Justice system each year in Australia.


Addressing unfair behaviour
Addressing unfair behaviour

What do you say when?

  • A parent is overheard commenting to another parent, “Thank God that black student has gone. I didn’t like her being around my child.

  • A group of parents are talking at the gate. As you walk past you hear one say. ‘You know those Abo families get to come here for nothing. Its not fair, they already get too many handouts!”

  • Have you heard comments like these?

  • What is values education?


What is values education
What is Values Education?

  • Care and compassion

  • Doing your best

  • Fair Go

  • Freedom

  • Honesty and trustworthiness

  • Integrity

  • Respect

  • Responsibility

  • Understanding Tolerance and Inclusion

  • The National Framework for Values Education (2005) page 18 All of Us

    www.valueseducation.edu.au


Cultural diversity in practice
Cultural Diversity in practice

  • What does this look like in a Early Childhood setting?

    What would you do differently?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XWg-ZrV3wPk


Modelling inclusive practice
Modelling Inclusive Practice

  • Using unbiased language – avoid racist, sexist, discriminatory stereotype remarks

  • Ensuring your own interactions are responsive to all children in the service

  • Being willing to examine personal biases

  • Demonstrating respect for all children and families

  • Providing information to workers, parents, families and communities

  • Addressing and challenging injustice


How do we build on good practice
How do we build on good practice ?

  • “Intercultural education is supported by sound principles and practices in teaching, learning and curriculum planning which aim to prepare students to better understand themselves and others and to participate actively in their local and global communities.”

  • “All of Us” Victorian Multicultural Commission

  • Inclusive practices – what are they?

  • What do we mean by Values Education?


Quiz about bi lingualism
Quiz about bi-lingualism

  • Can children learn a second language?

  • Can they learn it under 4

  • Isn’t it confusing for them?

  • Shouldn’t we encourage parents to speak English so they can be ready for school?

  • What’s the point of learning another language when they are living here?


Toddler brain scan gives language insight
Toddler brain scan gives language insight

  • The left hand side of the brain has more myelin

  • The brain has a critical window for language development between the ages of two and four, brain scans suggest.

  • http://www.bbc.com/news/health-24446292#story_continues_


Toddler brain scan gives language insight1
Toddler brain scan gives language insight

  • It explains why young children are good at learning two languages.

  • They used brain scans to look at myelin - the insulation that develops from birth within the circuitry of the brain.

  • To their surprise, they found the distribution of myelin is fixed from the age of four, suggesting the brain is most plastic in very early life.


Lecturers lidia hall and christine cook

How can learning a second language help English literacy? http://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/principals/curriculum/Pages/languageliteracy.aspx

  • There is a lot of evidence to suggest that learning an additional language can enhance English literacy.

  • Some of the ways are:

  • by comparing features of their first language with those of another language learners are better able to understand the structure and workings of English

  • language learners develop and enhance their skills and strategies for decoding and making meaning from words and this transfers to English


How can learning a second language help english literacy
How can learning a second language help English literacy?

  • There is a lot of evidence to suggest that learning an additional language can enhance English literacy.

  • Some of the ways are:

  • learners develop flexibility and competence in dealing with language concepts

  • an additional language can provide a new beginning and success for learners who have struggled with English. This has been shown to be beneficial, both in terms of English language development and for the self-esteem of learners


Cultural diversity and family structure a capacity building approach1
Cultural Diversity and family structure a capacity building approach

Scenarios

  • How do you integrate a child who is of Chinese background, born in Australia. Sent to China to be looked after by grandparents in his early years of his life then returns at Kinder age to be reunited with parents who the child does not recognise. Parents are both working and child is placed in a childcare centre.

  • A newly arrival Sudanese family who have been in the country for six weeks.

  • What are your responsibilities as a teacher to provide a quality socially just program for children from diverse family backgrounds?


Cultural diversity and family structure a capacity building approach2
Cultural Diversity and family structure approacha capacity building approach

  • Before placement try to arrange a meeting with your mentor teacher to discuss:

    • How many different cultural groups are in your school?

    • What is the family structure of children in your group?

    • Who is the main carer for the children?

    • Why do we need to know about cultural diversity?


Resources
Resources approach

  • FKA Children’s Services, Richmond (Early Childhood focused)

  • The Migrant Hub Wyndham

  • Multicultural Commission

  • Immigration Museum

  • AMES About AMES

    • For 60 years AMES has helped new and recently arrived refugees and migrants to settle in to Victoria. AMES offers much more than just teaching English – we not only work with new arrivals but also with the community, business and Government to develop sustainable and effective settlement solutions for the whole Victorian community.

    • Our vision is “Full Participation for all in a cohesive and diverse society”.

      • The Multicultural Hub


Resources1
Resources approach

Racism. No way!

http://www.racismnoway.com.au/

Australians Against Racism

http://www.australiansagainstracism.org/

Amnesty International Australia

http://www.amnesty.org.au/

Global Education

http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/

Aboriginal Education Koori Heritage Trust

http://www.koorieheritagetrust.com/

Multicultural Arts Victoria http://www.multiculturalarts.com.au/events2014/diversity.shtml

http://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Pages/earlyyears/index.aspx


Resources2
Resources approach

Victorian Early Years Learning and Development Framework: Birth to 8 years (VEYLDF)

Victorian Early Years Learning and Development Framework (pdf - 2.1mb)

Report on the Assessment for Learning and Development Project 2012 Transforming Practice in the early years

Report on the Assessment for Learning and Development Project 2012 Transforming Practice in the Early Years (pdf - 5.34mb)

National Quality Agenda

http://acecqa.gov.au/national-quality-agenda-it-system

Australian Journal of Early Childhood, June 2013. NEW!

Victorian Early Years Learning and Development Framework: Managing change in a complex environment (pdf - 2.12mb)

http://www.prejudicenoway.com/


What is happening in your backyard
What is happening in your backyard? approach

  • Recycled Orchestra - Cateura, Paraguay

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yDQ6c_bLr2o


Next week
Next week approach

  • Topic: Action Planning for change: SMART action plan principles


Tutorial topics for discussio
Tutorial approach– Topics for discussio

Issues to consider

  • The role of culture and identity

  • The role of language and communication

  • The image of the family and who it serves

  • Partnerships with families

  • The concept of capacity building

  • Why be Agents of change?


Agents of change means
Agents of change means.... approach

  • If you want to be agents of change you need to;

    • Recognize an unfair comment or action

    • Equip yourself and others with the required skills and cultural understanding

    • Proactive

    • Be assertive

    • Have confidence

    • Have good language communication and problem solving skills

    • Know where to seek appropriate advice

    • Be aware of agencies who can help

    • Have self respect

    • Have a firm belief in your own vlaues.


Tutorial
Tutorial approach

  • How do you protect children who are vulnerable or discriminated against, or are difficult to provide services to;

  • How do you empower children who need a stronger voice by enabling them to express their own needs and ultimately make their own decisions?

  • Do children who speak another language have literacy skills?

  • What does research say about children who speak more than one language?


Lecturers lidia hall and christine cook
Tutorial approachHow do I empower myself as a Just Educator? Chapter seven: advocacy –working in childrens services

  • I promise to do all I can – at work, at home and as a concerned citizen so make sure that all children and families have the opportunity to thrive

  • I will:

    • Speak out on behalf of children at every opportunity

    • Do something to improve the life of one child beyond my family or classroom

    • Hold public officials accountable for making children's well being and learning a national commitment in actions as well as words

    • Encourage the organisations to which I belong to make a commitment to children and families

    • Urge others to become children's champions.

      The National Association for the Education of Young Children 1996 uses the notion of a childrens champion in association with its code of Ethical Conduct as noted in the following pledge (NAEYC 1996 pg 58)


Tutorial1
Tutorial approach

Supporting the Development of Inclusive Policies

  • Why are the Development of Inclusive policies important to Just Educators?

  • What are they and how do they impact the way you teach children?

  • Inclusive means more than Multicultural. Discuss.

  • How does your Educational Philosophy support your values and cultural diversity?

    page 321 Chapter seven advocacy working in children's services.


By being agents for change we are
By being Agents for change we approach are;

  • Protecting people who are vulnerable or discriminated against, or a re-difficult to provide services to

  • Empowering people who need a stronger voice by enabling them to express their own needs and ultimately make their own decisions.

  • Building on capacity

  • Developing a positive learning environment that reflects cultural diversity and social inclusion.

  • How is social inclusion reflected in your lesson plans?


Tutorial2
Tutorial approach

  • Have you found yourself in a situation where you had to advocate for someone?

  • Do you have any stories where you were witness to someone who wasn't receiving a “fair go.”

  • What would your children's environment reflect a culturally diverse, values based setting?

  • How do you develop parent partnerships?