Seminar I Learning to Teach - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Seminar I Learning to Teach PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Seminar I Learning to Teach

play fullscreen
1 / 31
Seminar I Learning to Teach
166 Views
Download Presentation
hansel
Download Presentation

Seminar I Learning to Teach

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Seminar I Learning to Teach Norm Dennis

  2. Learning to TeachSeminar’s Objectives Describe why learning to teach is important Explain how we are going to learn to teach

  3. Background Knowledge Probe

  4. The State of STEM Education US ranked 21st in science and 25th in math (below the world avg.) Engineering BS graduates are down 20% since 1985 2000-2009 Engineering jobs grew at 3X other occupations STEM faculty have usually received little or no education related to the current issues in STEM education. current knowledge about learning modern effective teaching and assessment practices Teachers at all levels get their information and attitudes about STEM disciplines from university courses taken from departments specializing in those subjects. These teachers educate all of our children. Tough Choices or Tough Times:The Report of the New Commission on the Skills of the American Workforce (National Center on Education and the Economy (NCEE), 2007)

  5. Few engineering faculty members receive any formal training. The NSPE Code of Ethics“Engineers shall perform services only in the areas of their competence.” Why Learn to Teach? Teaching when you are not competent to do so is unethical!

  6. Small Group Activity Think about the following question... What issues contribute to undergraduate students leaving engineering? Rank the issues in order of concern 1 = most important

  7. What SME Students Said… 1990-1993 Seymour & Hewitt study: Studied 335 students at 7 institutions Validated via 125 students at 6 other institutions Hallmark study = still highly regarded & referenced The students Entering math SAT 650 Juniors or seniors 55% Switchers 47% Engineering Seymour, E. and N. M. Hewitt. 1997. Talking About Leaving: Why Undergraduates Leave the Sciences. Westview Press.

  8. Cited as a Concern by Engineering Students

  9. Switchers & non-switchers did not differ in academic performance & other issues like…

  10. What SME Students SaidReasons for Poor Teaching Good teaching is not valued or rewarded Preoccupation with research Inadequate preparation No logical structure Unable to explain ideas coherently No practical applications Boring presentations Do not understand how people learn “…virtually unanimous … no set of issues…was more in need of … improvement than faculty pedagogy.”

  11. New Studies Support Conclusions The environment created by faculty affects student performance and persistence. High attrition (>40%) might be better addressed by changing teaching practices. Vogt, C. 2008. Faculty as a Critical Juncture in Student Retention and Performance in Engineering Programs. J. Eng. Ed. Jan. 27-36. Vogt, C., D. Hocevar, L. Hagedorn. 2007. A Social Construct Validation: Determining Women’s and Men’s Success in Engineering Programs. J. Higher Ed. 78:3 337-364.

  12. Why is this happening? We, the content experts, haven’t learned “how to teach”

  13. We may be doing the best job we know how to do, but… We have not learned “how to teach.” Disciplinary expertise ≠ Good teaching Excessive time & energy, yet poor results. Boice’s Quick Starters: Teaching Effectiveness Fosters Exemplary Performance in All Aspects Boice, R. 1991. Quick Starters. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 48, 11-121.

  14. Small Group Activity In your teams… Pick a recorder. How did you learn to teach? List the 3 most common activities or experiences of your team. You have two minutes.

  15. Learning to Teach Few engineering faculty members have received formal training in teaching and learning.

  16. Some believe misconceptions like: The best scholars are the best teachers. (Fairweather, 1996) Great teachers are born, not made. (Sviniki, 1994) Teaching is an art, not a science. (Sviniki, 1994) However: Those of us not born to be teachers can learn a lot about… Teachers need to be well prepared in the tools of their art... Learning to Teach

  17. Small Group Activity In your teams… Pick a different recorder. What would have made the learning process about teaching more effective? List the 3 most common activities or experiences of your team. You have two minutes.

  18. How should we learn to teach? How should our students learn engineering? Different questions… Same answer…

  19. A Framework for Teaching & Learning • Provide an orientation: • Why is this important? • How does it relate to prior knowledge? • Provide learning objectives. • Provide information. • Stimulate critical thinking about the subject. • Provide models. • Provide opportunities to apply the knowledge: • In a familiar context. • In new and unfamiliar contexts. • Assess the learners’ performance and provide feedback. • Provide opportunities for self-assessment.

  20. Two Key Definitions Assessment - A measurement of performance, for the purpose of improving future performance. Evaluation - A measurement of performance against a set of prescribed standards, usually for the purpose of reward or punishment.

  21. A Framework for Teaching & Learning • Provide an orientation: • Why is this important? • How does it relate to prior knowledge? • Provide learning objectives. • Provide information. • Stimulate critical thinking about the subject. • Provide models. • Provide opportunities to apply the knowledge: • In a familiar context. • In new and unfamiliar contexts. • Assess the learners’ performance and provide feedback. • Provide opportunities for self-assessment.

  22. The “ExCEEd Teaching Strategy” Structured organization Based on learning objectives Appropriate to the subject matter Varied, to appeal to different learning styles Engaging presentation Clear written and verbal communication High degree of contact with students Physical models & demonstrations Enthusiasm Positive rapport with students Frequent assessment of student learning Classroom assessment techniques Out-of-class homework and projects Appropriate use of technology Teacher is a Positive Role Model

  23. Instructional Framework How we should learn about teaching? How should our students should learn engineering? Learning Objectives Orient Inform Stimulate Demonstrate Application Opportunities Assess &Feedback Self-assessment

  24. Learning to Teach Learning Objectives Orient Inform Stimulate Demonstrate Application Opportunities Assess &Feedback Self-assessment Via the Instructional Framework

  25. Learning to Teach Learning Objectives Orient Inform Stimulate Demonstrate Application Opportunities Assess &Feedback Self-assessment Via the Instructional Framework

  26. Seminars All together in room Koelbel 340 Presentations & discussions Small group work Your responsibilities Ask questions Participate in group work

  27. Learning to Teach Learning Objectives Orient Inform Stimulate Demonstrate Application Opportunities Assess &Feedback Self-assessment Via the Instructional Framework

  28. Demonstration Classes All together in room ECCR 245 Role-play Average undergraduate engineering student Answer and ask questions accordingly Bring calculator Why View classes from the perspective of student Authentic assessment

  29. Learning to Teach Learning Objectives Orient Inform Stimulate Demonstrate Application Opportunities Assess &Feedback Self-assessment Via the Instructional Framework

  30. Labs - Your Practice Classes 6 teams 4 participants 1 mentor 1 assistant mentor Observer(s) One classroom per team Incorporate & practice workshop techniques Assessment Teammates role play

  31. References Tough Choices or Tough Times:The Report of the New Commission on the Skills of the American Workforce (National Center on Education and the Economy (NCEE), 2007) Vogt, C. 2008. Faculty as a Critical Juncture in Student Retention and Performance in Engineering Programs. J. Eng. Ed. Jan. 27-36. Vogt, C., D. Hocevar, L. Hagedorn. 2007. A Social Construct Validation: Determining Women’s and Men’s Success in Engineering Programs. J. Higher Ed. 78:3 337-364. Seymour, E. and N. M. Hewitt. 1997. Talking About Leaving: Why Undergraduates Leave the Sciences. Westview Press. Tobias, S. 1990. They’re Not Dumb, They’re Different. Research Corporation. Tucson. AZ. Fairweather, J.S. 1996. Faculty Work and Public Trust: Restoring the Value of Teaching and Public Service in American Academic Life. Allyn & Bacon. Sviniki, M. 1994. Seven Deadly Comments…That Block Learning About Teaching. The National Teaching & Learning Forum. Vol. 3. No. 3. Boice, R. 1991. Quick Starters. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 48, 11-121.