The hip iliofemoral joint
Download
1 / 41

- PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 171 Views
  • Updated On :

The Hip (Iliofemoral) Joint . Presented by: Heidi Jackie Kayla Paul. Surface Anatomy. Surface Anatomy. Surface Anatomy. Surface Anatomy. Right Hip Bone. Lateral View. Medial View. © Trail Guide to the Body by Books of Discovery .

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about '' - hana


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
The hip iliofemoral joint l.jpg
The Hip (Iliofemoral) Joint

  • Presented by:

  • Heidi

  • Jackie

  • Kayla

  • Paul






Right hip bone l.jpg
Right Hip Bone

Lateral View

Medial View

© Trail Guide to the Body by Books of Discovery

© Trail Guide to the Body by Books of Discovery



Femur l.jpg
Femur

Adductor Tubercle



Muscles of hip flexion l.jpg
Muscles of Hip Flexion

  • Psoas Major

  • Iliacus

  • Sartorius

  • Pectineus

  • Rectus femoris

  • Tensor fascia latae

© Trail Guide to the Body by Books of Discovery


Psoas major iliacus l.jpg
Psoas Major Iliacus

O: Iliac Fossa

I: Lesser trochanter

A: Hip flexion

Inv: Femoral Nerve

O: Anterior and lateral surfaces of T12 thru L5

I: Lesser trochanter

A: Hip Flexion

Inv: L2 and L3

© Trail Guide to the Body by Books of Discovery


Sartorius pectineus l.jpg
Sartorius Pectineus Iliacus

O: Anterior superior iliac spine

I: Proximal medial aspect of tibia

A: Combination of hip flexion, abduction, lateral rotation

Inv: Femoral nerve

Vas: Lateral circumflex femoral artery

O: Superior ramus of pubis

I: Pectineal line of femur

A: Hip flexion and adduction

Inv: Femoral nerve

Vas: Medial circumflex femoral artery

© Trail Guide to the Body by Books of Discovery


Rectus femoris tensor fascia latae l.jpg
Rectus IliacusFemoris Tensor Fascia Latae

O: Anterior inferior iliac spine

I: Tibial tuberosity

A: Hip flexion, knee extention

Inv: Femoral nerve

Vas: Lateral circumflex femoral artery

O: Anterior superior iliac spine

I: Lateral condyle of tibia

A: Combined hip flexion and abduction

Inv: Superior gluteal nerve

Vas: Superior gluteal artery

© Trail Guide to the Body by Books of Discovery


Muscles of extension l.jpg
Muscles of Extension Iliacus

  • Semimembranosus

  • Semitendinosus

  • Biceps femoris

  • Gluteus maximus

© Trail Guide to the Body by Books of Discovery


Semimembranosus semitendinosis l.jpg
Semimembranosus Semitendinosis Iliacus

O: Ischial tuberosity

I: Posterior surface of medial condyle of tibia

A: Extend hip and flex knee

Inv: Sciatic nerve

Vas: Inferior gluteal artery

O: Ischial tuberosity

I: Anteromedial surface of proximal tibia

A: Extend hip and flex knee

Inv: Sciatic nerve

Vas: Deep femoral

© Trail Guide to the Body by Books of Discovery


Biceps femoris gluteus maximus l.jpg
Biceps Femoris Gluteus Maximus Iliacus

O: LH Ischial tuberosity; SH Lateral lip of linea aspera

I: Fibular head

A: LH extend hip and flex knee; SH flex knee

Inv: LH Sciatic nerve; SH Common peroneal nerve

Vas: Inferior gluteal artery

O: Posterior sacrum and ilium

I: Posterior femur distal to greater trochanter

A: Hip extension, hyperextension, lateral rotation

Inv: Inferior gluteal nerve

Vas: Superior gluteal artery

© Trail Guide to the Body by Books of Discovery


Muscles of adduction l.jpg
Muscles of Adduction Iliacus

  • Adductor Brevis

  • Adductor Magnus

  • Adductor Longus

  • Gracilis

  • Pectineus

© Trail Guide to the Body by Books of Discovery


Adductor brevis adductor magnus l.jpg
Adductor Brevis Adductor Magnus Iliacus

O: Pubis

I: Pectineal line and proximal linea aspera

A: Extend hip and flex knee

Inv: Obturator nerve

Vas: Deep femoral artery

O: Ischium and pubis

I: Entire linea aspera and adductor tubercle

A: Hip adduction

Inv: Obturator nerve

Vas: Obturator and Deep femoral artery

© Trail Guide to the Body by Books of Discovery


Adductor longus l.jpg
Adductor Longus Iliacus

O: Pubis

I: Middle one-third of the lineaaspera

A: Hip adduction

Inv: Obturator nerve

Vas: Obturator artery and Deep Femoral artery

© Trail Guide to the Body by Books of Discovery


Gracilis pectineus l.jpg
Gracilis Pectineus Iliacus

O: Pubis

I: Anterior medial surface of proximal end of tibia

A: Hip adduction

Inv: Obturator nerve

Vas: Obturator artery

O: Superior ramus of pubis

I: Pectineal line of femur

A: Hip flexion and adduction

Inv: Femoral nerve

Vas: Medial circumflex femoral artery

© Trail Guide to the Body by Books of Discovery


Muscles of abduction l.jpg
Muscles of Abduction Iliacus

  • Sartorius

  • Gluteus medius

  • Gluteus minimus

  • Piriformis

  • Tensor fascia latae

© Trail Guide to the Body by Books of Discovery


Gluteus medius gluteus minimus l.jpg
Gluteus Medius Gluteus Minimus Iliacus

O: Lateral ilium

I: Greater trochanter

A: Hip Abduction

Inv: Superior gluteal nerve

Vas: Superior gluteal artery

O: Lateral ilium

I: Anterior surface of the greater trochanter

A: Hip abduction, medial rotation

Inv: Superior gluteal nerve

Vas: superior gluteal artery

© Trail Guide to the Body by Books of Discovery


Piriformis l.jpg
Piriformis Iliacus

O: Internal surface of sacrum; Sacrotuberous ligament

I: Superior border of greater trochanter

A: Lateral rotation, abduction, helps hold femur in acetabulum

Inv: L5, S1 and S2

Vas: Superior and inferior gluteal arteries

© Trail Guide to the Body by Books of Discovery


Lateral rotation l.jpg
Lateral Rotation Iliacus

  • Sartorius

  • Gluteus Maximus

  • Piriformis

© Trail Guide to the Body by Books of Discovery


Gluteus maximus l.jpg
Gluteus IliacusMaximus

O: Posterior sacrum and ilium

I: Posterior femur distal to greater trochanter

A: Hip extension, hyperextension, lateral rotation

Inv: Inferior gluteal nerve

Vas: Superior gluteal artery

© Trail Guide to the Body by Books of Discovery


Medial rotation l.jpg
Medial Rotation Iliacus

  • Gluteus minimus

© Trail Guide to the Body by Books of Discovery


Ligaments of hip joint fibrous tissue that connects bones to other bones l.jpg
Ligaments of Hip Joint: Iliacusfibrous tissue that connects bones to other bones

Iliofemoral Ligament: lies anterior of hip joint, serves great strength to joint by resisting hyperextension.

Pubofemoral Ligament: lies inferior to hip joint, helps thicken the capsule.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iliofemoral_ligament http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pubofemoral_ligament

Fundamentals of Anatomy & Physiology 6th edition http://www.laboratorium.dist.unige.it/~piero/Teaching/Gait/Malanga%20and%20DeLisa%20Clinical%20Observation.htm


Ligaments continued l.jpg
Ligaments IliacusContinued

Ischiofemoral Ligament: lies posterior to hip joint, consist of triangular band of strong fibers, helps thicken capsule.

Zona Orbicularis Ligament: lies at lower and back of capsule, forms a circular collar around the neck of femur .

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ischiofemoral_ligament http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zona_orbicularis

Fundamentals of Anatomy & Physiology 6th edition http://content.answers.com/main/content/wp/en-commons/thumb/d/de/250px-Gray343.png http://www.laboratorium.dist.unige.it/~piero/Teaching/Gait/Malanga%20and%20DeLisa%20Clinical%20Observation.htm


Ligaments continued29 l.jpg
Ligaments IliacusContinued

Transverse of Acetabulum Ligament: crosses the acetabular notch, fills in gap of inferior border of acetabulum.

Ligament of femoral head: lies along transverse acetabular ligament, attaches to a small pit in the center of femoral head & acts when hip is flexed and thigh is laterally rotated.

Fundamentals of Anatomy & Physiology 6th edition http://www.laboratorium.dist.unige.it/~piero/Teaching/Gait/Malanga%20and%20DeLisa%20Clinical%20Observation.htm


Ligaments continued30 l.jpg
Ligaments IliacusContinued

Sacrotuberous Ligament: runs from sacrum to ischial tuberosity of ischium, is flat and triangular shape, in a study was absent in 13% of cadavers.

Inguinal Ligament: formed by external oblique aponerurotic fibers , runs from anterior superior iliac spine to pubic tubercle. Strengthens the abdominal wall. Is concerned with hernias.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacrotuberous_ligament http://www.med.mun.ca/anatomyts/digest/abwall.htm

http://www.laboratorium.dist.unige.it/~piero/Teaching/Gait/Malanga%20and%20DeLisa%20Clinical%20Observation.htm http://www.smbs.buffalo.edu/ana/newpage32.htm


Articular cartilage provide smooth and slick surfaces to reduce friction during movements of joint l.jpg
Articular Cartilage Iliacus: provide smooth and slick surfaces to reduce friction during movements of joint.

Acetabular labrum: is a ring of cartilage that surrounds the acetabulum to deepen the socket, making it harder for the femur head to slip out of place.

Articular cartilage of head of femur: Is smooth and tough material that covers the femur head that help cushion between the bones and lets the femur move easily.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acetabular_labrum http://www.aafp.org/afp/991015ap/1687_f7.jpg

http://www.lasvegaspaininstitute.com/pain.htm Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology sixth edition


Articular capsule l.jpg
Articular Capsule Iliacus

Articular capsule: The joint cavity that is enclosed by a two-layered articular (joint) capsule.

Fibrous Capsule: A tough external layer composed of dense irregular tissue that is continuous with the periostea of the articulating bones. It strengthens the joint so that the bones are not pulled apart.

Synovial membrane: The inner layer of the joint capsule that is composed of loose connective tissue. The synovial membrane secretes synovial fluid. Synovial fluid is found within the articular cartilages, it provides a slippery weight-bearing film that reduces friction between the cartilages.


Slide33 l.jpg
Bursae: Iliacussmall fluid filled pockets located in connective tissue. They develop where tendons or ligaments rub against other tissue.

Trochanteric Bursae: is inflammation to the hip located on the tip of greater trochanter. Is common cause of hip pain. Most often caused by overuse or direct trauma to joint. More likely to involve in women.

Ischial Bursae: inflammation that separates the gluteal maximus muscle from the ischial tuberosity. Usually formed from prolonged sitting on hard surfaces that press against the bones.

Fundamentals of Anatomy & Physiology 6th edition http://www.clevelandclinic.org/arthritis/treat/facts/Tronchanteric%20Bursitis.htm http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=17111 http://d2844653.temp75.hostica.com/images/Trochanteric-bursitis.jpg


Bursae continued l.jpg
Bursae IliacusContinued

Glutealfemoral Bursae: contains 2 or3 small bursae located between the tendon of the gluteus maximus and the rough line of the femur shaft.

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=intermuscular%20gluteal%20bursa


Piriformis syndrome l.jpg
Piriformis Syndrome Iliacus

Piriformis Syndrome

is caused when the

sciatic nerve is

compressed by the

piriformis muscle.

Piriformis syndrome will

cause a dull pain in the

hip or buttock region and

sometimes may be

experienced from the

lower back all the way to the foot.


Piriformis syndrome36 l.jpg
Piriformis Syndrome Iliacus

Piriformis Syndrome is caused by two main groups:

Overload- caused by training errors, sports that require a lot of running, and sedentary lifesyles.

Exercising on hard surfaces

Exercising on uneven surfaces

Exercsing in worn-out shoes

Sitting for long periods of time

Biomechanical Inefficiencies- faulty foot and body mechanics, gait disturbances, and poor posture or sitting habits.

Poor running or walking habits

Walking with your toes pointing out

Stiff muscles in the lower back, buttocks, and hips


Treatment l.jpg
Treatment Iliacus

Have a thorough warm-up to help prepare the tendons and muscles for an upcoming activity. This way the muscles will not be tight or stiff when you are exercising.

Always allow your muscles for rest and recovery after heavy exercise.

Strengthening and conditioning of the hips, buttocks, and lower back will help prevent piriformis syndrome.

Flexible muscles and tendons are significant in the prevention of strains or sprains. When muscles and tendons are flexible they are able to move and perform without being overstretched unlike muscles that are tight or stiff.


Name that surface anatomy l.jpg
Name That Surface Anatomy!! Iliacus

Posterior Superior Iliac Spine

Greater Trochanter


Bone quiz l.jpg
Bone Quiz! Iliacus

Acetabulum

Ischial Spine

YOU DID IT!!


Do you know your muscles l.jpg
Do You Know Your Muscles?! Iliacus

What muscle is shown?

Rectus Femoris

What action does it assist in?

Flexion


How about those ligaments l.jpg
How About Those Ligaments?! Iliacus

What three ligaments are shown?

Iliofemoral Ligament:

Ischiofemoral Ligament

Zona Orbicularis Ligament


ad