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Lawson Public School. List members of the group, roles and % contribution to the presentation Hayley Bullen 16% Monique Commins 16% Samantha Dudley Group Leader (20%) Amy Harris 16% Melissa Shaw 16% Wendy Wright 16%.

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slide1

Lawson Public School

  • List members of the group, roles and % contribution to the presentation
  • Hayley Bullen 16%
  • Monique Commins 16%
  • Samantha Dudley Group Leader (20%)
  • Amy Harris 16%
  • Melissa Shaw 16%
  • Wendy Wright 16%

Delete ONE of these boxes to confirm that all group members agree to the percent contributions.

slide2

Audio Commentary

Established in 1888, Lawson Public school is a co-educational primary school, located in the metropolitan area in the heart of the Blue Mountains, NSW. Lawson Public School has strong valued links with the local community and environment. The school strives on providing programs and support for all students that encourage building friendships, social skills, confidence and self – esteem.

Lawson Public school promotes healthy active lifestyles through a program in which they have adopted called “crunch and sip”. The school encourages daily physical activity by participating in Jump Rope for Heart, School sports carnivals and sporting teams that compete against other schools. Students engaged in a program that was an enormous success called “Be Skilled, Be Fit”, this program assists in the development of a range of new skills in the area of gymnastics.

Lawson Public School preformed slightly above average in Literacy and Numeracy for their year 3 students in 2011 NAPLAN, however their year 5 students preformed on target with their Literacy skills but fell well under the state and region in Numeracy.

Our group has chosen the factors for this slide as they are relevant to teaching and promoting health and well-being amongst the students in our school. Additionally they are necessary and important to develop positive attitudes and values towards participating in an active and healthy lifestyle.

Reference:

http://web1.lawson-p.schools.nsw.edu.au/Welcome.html

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http://www.lawson-p.schools.nsw.edu.au/Welcome.html

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NOTE:

This is the audio commentary for the previous slide ‘Priority Health Area: Obesity in Australia’

In selecting a priority health area, our group believes it is imperative to target obesity. This decision was founded upon research that indicates obesity has been recognised as a priority health area since April 2008. Furthermore, our decisions were also based upon concerns stemming from the local community and schools, pertaining to an increase of obesity rates, along with the health related risks involved. This is particularly evident in our local newspaper ‘Blue Mountains Gazette’, where there have been numerous articles relating to overweight and obese school children. These reports show that doctors indicate there is a dramatic increase in the number and severity of childhood obesity cases they are treating; therefore, resulting in a high demand for specialist child obesity clinics, and  a ''huge increase'' in overweight children with joint and musculoskeletal problems because of their weight.

The gazette also provides other information leading towards preventative measures and education. This is evident in a local and national aim to ban chocolate fund-raising drives, and junk food advertising throughout schools and on television, in order to control childhood obesity. There are additional recommendations throughout the local paper to start teaching children at a young age with programs to help them to understand the necessary components of living a healthy and active lifestyle. This involves designing school programs to educate children about the calorie content of foods and their bodies' daily calorie needs, along with a strong focus on exercise that that can be incorporated into future adult daily lives. It is important to provide all children with nutrition education to show them that a good healthy diet and physical activity can prevent many medical problems such as weak bones, diabetes and asthma.

This priority health area is relevant to all stages of schooling, and our group has chosen to specifically target stage 1, as we agree with the recommendations put forth by the Blue Mountains Gazette that quality physical and health education programs should begin at a young age to aid in successful development of skills, knowledge and positive attitudes towards maintaining life-long optimum health and well-being.

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An International snapshot of the Health status of Australia's children

Boys

Girls

These maps show the rate of childhood obesity for boys and girls aged 5-17. Lighter blue is less obese, through to dark red for more obese.

http://www.bluemountainsgazette.com.au/specialfeature.aspx?id=6142

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NOTE:

This is the audio commentary for the previous slide ‘An international snapshot of the health status of Australia’s children’

Obesity has reached epidemic proportions throughout the western world, and according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), Australia ranks fifth in the world for adult obesity, with a rate of 26.6 % (BMG, 2012). Monash Obesity and Diabetes Institute 2012, states that Australia has ‘more than doubled in the past 20 years’ with around one in four adults being obese (AIHW, 2012). Direct and indirect costs related to this priority health area approximate to $830 million every year, which include inactivity and over consumption of food, diseases, and social costs. Obesity is rapidly increasing in Australian adults, and it has been estimated that 20% - 25% of Australian children are either overweight or obese. This clearly demonstrates obesity is an important public health priority which needs to address Australian children’s balance and adequacy of overall food intake, and the difficulty they have in making informed food choices due to the vast variety of foods available.

This slide is a snapshot of the health status of Australia’s school children, which was published online by our local Blue Mountains Gazette. It provides a current and clear indication of how Australia’s childhood obesity levels compare with the other countries around the world. The images show that boys and girls aged 5-17 years are at about a 25-29 % obesity rate which is above average compared to some countries such as China. This information contributes to the growing concerns throughout our local community to provide all school children with adequate physical and health education, and to employ important intervention and preventative measures as in ‘Crunch and Sip’, ‘Be skilled, Be Fit’ from the government, to support the fight against obesity.

slide7

Student Health Status

http://www.lawson-p.schools.nsw.edu.au/Welcome.html

slide8

NOTE:

This is the audio commentary for the previous slide ‘Student Health Status’

To accommodate and maintain the student health status at Lawson Public school, they have adopted a variety of sound programs to help educate and promote healthy active lifestyles throughout the school, parents and the broader community.

The crunch and sip program was first launched by the NSW government in 2007 as a state wide initiative, ‘in a bid to tackle childhood obesity’. If children are overweight or obese it can have a significantly negative effect on their physical, social and mental wellbeing; therefore, this program aims to increase fruit and vegetable and water consumption, and decrease consumption of energy dense foods and soft drinks. Lawson Public School has successfully implemented this program, allowing students to take a break after their morning session of learning activities. Students also participate in the cultivation of the school vegie patch, to learn how to grow, harvest, and prepare fresh healthy food. This facilitates in developing the skills needed in making healthy food choices, and raising awareness of the vital nutrients of foods needed to keep them healthy.

The students of Lawson Public School take part annually in the ‘Jump rope for heart’ program. This enables students to see the benefit of vigorous exercise, and to have the opportunity to help others through fund-raising for a worthy cause. This program also educates them about serious health issues that are linked to obesity such as heart disease, and stroke.

Other programs implemented are weekly sport and PE programs to teach students fundamental motor skills and promote the importance of physical activity and the effects it has on the body. Lawson Public School also provides a ‘Be Skilled, Be Fit’ program which specialised instructors come into the school to help promote fun, physical activity; building social skills and to encourage healthy active lifestyles.

slide9

Outcomes

Rationale:

When individuals are well informed on health issues and have a sense of control about the decisions they make, they are more likely to experience positive relationships, improved quality of life and less illness. PDHPE programs play a unique role in the development of students’ knowledge, understandings and practical skills that lead to better health. This KLA promotes physical activity which is an essential ingredient for the development and maintenance of optimum health. It can improve cardiovascular efficiency and aid efforts to reduce risk factors of coronary heart disease. It is critical for enhancing bone development, controlling obesity and improving psychological health and immune status. School programs support students in making informed decisions about factors that may hinder or promote the wellbeing of themselves and others, and aim to nurture positive attitudes towards regular physical activity

Aim:

To develop in each student the knowledge and understanding, skills and values and attitudes needed to lead a healthy, active and fulfilling lives

Objectives:

Values and Attitudes

  • To develop students’ appreciation of and a commitment to healthy and socially just ways of living.

Skills

  • To develop skills in making, communicating and acting upon health decisions

Knowledge

  • To develop students’ knowledge and understanding about ways to enhance personal and community health and wellbeing

(B.O.S. 2006)

slide10

NOTE:

This is the audio commentary for the previous slide ‘Outcomes’

In today’s society it is important that all individuals engage in living an active healthy lifestyle. The demands of contemporary living have raised many concerns at global, national and state levels in relation to developing public awareness of obesity, through educating individuals in how to lead a healthy lifestyle, and to promote a love for life-long physical activity.

Through targeting obesity, our group intends to focus on Nutrition Education, along with preventative measures to achieve the development of the skills, knowledge and positive values and attitudes in leading a long healthy and active lifestyle.

The program will not only aim to encourage children to be more active; engaging in vigorous physical activity to promote optimal health, but to ensure that they are well educated on the serious health issues related to obesity, and the preventative measures that can be taken to avoid illness and disease in later life.

Additionally, we aim to inspire children and to nurture positive attitudes towards making healthy conscious decisions about the importance of balanced eating habits, including identifying food groups for good health and regular participation in physical activity.

Furthermore, it is also important that we aim to develop children’s knowledge to be able to communicate with their parents, peers, and the wider community the values of Nutrition Education and preventive measures to pursue a well-informed quality life, which has been shaped by professional programing based on the foundations on the New South Wales K-6 PDHPE syllabus.

slide11

Audio commentary:

This slide outlines the content to be taught from K-6, along with the outcomes and indicators for each stage.

The stage our group has focused on is Stage 1.

Through realising these outcomes, our group aspires to achieve a sound health nutrition education across the stages for all students by teaching the content and addressing the outcomes from the PDHPE K-6 syllabus. It is through these outcomes that we will develop students’ knowledge skills, values and attitudes towards maintaining optimum health, engaging in physical activity and to make informed choices in the selection of food for a balanced diet.

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(B.O.S. 2006)

http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/primary/pdhpe/phc/nut001a.htm

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Audio:

At Lawson Public School our school policy aims to ensure all students have the knowledge, skills and understanding needed to lead healthy and active lives; while developing positive attitudes through school activities to reinforce healthy eating and good nutrition. Nutrition Education is an essential part of everyday life. Our school takes pride in working together to ensure that through professional staff development, students, parents and the community are well informed of our efforts to promote life-long healthy habits and activity.

Students, staff, parents and community members work together to develop and enhance personal community health and well being. This is achieved by encouraging children to be more active, engaging in vigorous physical activity to promote optimal health and to ensure they are all well educated on the serious health issues related to obesity.

This School policy will be reviewed at the beginning of every school semester so we can monitor the progress being made at our school.

Lawson Public School policy

Our School Policy

Last updated: 20th July 2012

Rational: Promotes physical activity whilst improving cardiovascular efficiency. Nutrition Education is an essential part of everyday life. Our school takes pride in working together to ensure that through professional staff development, students, parents and the community are well informed of our efforts to promote life-long healthy habits and activity.

Aim: To ensure that all students have the knowledge, skills and understanding needed to lead healthy and active lives; while developing positive attitudes through school activities to reinforce healthy eating and good nutrition.

Implementation: Students, staff, parents and community members work together to develop and enhance personal community health and well being. This is achieved by encouraging children to be more active, engaging in vigorous physical activity to promote optimal health and to ensure they are all well educated on the serious health issues related to obesity.

Review: Beginning of every school semester.

Definition: Vigorous physical activity- the intensity of a students exercise. Optimal health- physical, emotional and mental health abilities. Cardiovascular efficiency- how well you can distribute blood and oxygen through your body

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This will be achieved by;

Ensuring that the school provides a supportive environment that accepts different ideas and values.

Taking care when discussing terms of obesity, paying particular attention to factual information and correcting any misleading information.

Adapting a range of teaching strategies to discuss a range of matters associated with obesity, that may be relatable to students lifestyles.

Providing opportunities for parents and caregivers to be involved or notified of guest speakers.

Audio: At Lawson Public School we acknowledge that there are sensitive issues related to obesity. These issues need to be attended to with care so that it can be managed appropriately. Early Care and Education are an important setting to implement childhood obesity prevention strategies.

Policies—including laws, mandates, regulations, standards, resolutions, and guidelines—provide a foundation for school district practices and procedures. Sound policies reassure families, students, and school staff; provide legal protection for schools; and support and direct individuals throughout the school system. Well-drafted and administered policies can also help contain or prevent controversy.

Procedures

At Lawson Public School we acknowledge that there are sensitive issues related to

obesity. These issues need to be attended to with care so that it can be managed

appropriately. This will be achieved by;

  • Ensuring that the school provides a supportive environment that accepts different ideas and values.
  • Taking care when discussing terms of obesity, paying particular attention to factual information and correcting any misleading information.
  • Adapting a range of teaching strategies to discuss a range of matters associated with obesity, that may be relatable to students lifestyles.
  • Providing opportunities for parents and caregivers to be involved or notified of guest speakers.
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A Selected Learning Activity: Food Group Concentration

Audio for this slide is reading directly off the Powerpoint, explaining the learning activity that is being conducted. Whilst mentioning the Outcome and Indicator present on the left hand side of the slide.

Notes:

Outcome to be addressed PHS1.12

Recognises that positive

health choices can

promote wellbeing.

Indicators:

  • Describes what people do to stay healthy, e.g. a balanced diet
  • Recognises that a variety of food is needed for good health

Identifies different foods that can keep them healthy .

Objective: As a result of the experience of this activity, students will come to a basic understand of the five main food groups, as it will encourage students to vary their diet amongst the five groups. Students will engage in and focus on nutrition education of this activity.

Equipment:

One Set of Five Food Group Cards

White Board and Markers

Blu Tack

Procedure:

  • Seat class on the floor facing the white board.
  • Introduce the five main food groups by creating heading on the white board. E.g. fruits and vegetables, grains, dairy, meats, fats and oils.
  • Hand the Five Food Group cards out to the class so each student has at least one.
  • Allow students to take turns in placing the card upon the white board under the correct heading. E.g. Lettuce goes under the fruits and vegetables food group.
  • Assess each food group at the end and evaluate the nutrition and healthiness of each food .
  • Wrap up the activity with a whole class discussion.

PHS1.12

Recognises that positive

health choices can

promote wellbeing

scope and sequence

Audio:

Our scope and sequences aims to focus on the specific teaching strategies across all areas of learning.

Throughout early stage one students will learn about aspects of positive health practices as shown in outcome PHES1.12. They will also focus upon outcome GDES1.9 that covers information on how people grow and change.

During terms 3 and 4 students will cover areas of physical activity using a variety of equipment.

Students progress from these previous outcomes during stage one. They are able to recognise positive health choices and promote well being. They are able to demonstrate a maturing performance of basic movement skills.

During stage 2 students learn to communicate in a variety of ways to discuss factors that influence personal health choices either as an individual or in a group. They are able to recognise the difference between regular and varied physical activity and how this affects their health and well being.

Stage 3 allows students to apply movement skills creatively to a variety of challenging situations. Students begin to explain the consequences of personal lifestyle choices and show how to maintain and improve the quality of an active lifestyle. They learn to explains and

demonstrates strategies for dealing with life changes.

Throughout our school plan students gain a firm grip on the content, skills and knowledge needed to lead a healthy, active and fulfilling life

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Scope and Sequence
slide17

Audio

Schools play a particularly critical role by providing an environment that supports and provides learning opportunities to practice healthy eating and physical activity. The challenges when addressing the health priority of childhood obesity in primary school education include external factors such as parents/caregivers and sensitivity.

One of the big challenges as educators is that we have little or no control over outside environments, we can educate the child but the parents/caregivers are ultimately the ones responsible for food preparation. Therefore, the challenge is how do we adapt physical activity and healthy eating habits outside of school. Many students receive conflicting messages in food and lifestyle choices. Furthermore, The ability of individuals to adopt a healthy lifestyle may be affected by the social and culture context in which they live. Part of the problem is that children don’t understand how eating habits relate to health.

Another challenge in addressing childhood obesity in primary school education is one of sensitivity. How do we address childhood obesity without children getting teased and /or prevent the negative attitudes of some parents/caregivers. Therefore, the challenge is how we eliminate the negativity from other children and the possibility labelling, teasing and bullying once a school addresses childhood obesity. Furthermore, how do we eliminate the negativity from parents/caregivers for example comments such as; my child isn’t fat, it’s medical, they will grow out of it, they can eat whatever they want.

Ultimately, health is a responsibility of all parts of society.

Do you believe young students need clear guidance concerning appropriate health attitudes and behaviours?

Evaluation

Do you believe schools can assist students in taking responsible action regarding their own lifestyle and well being?

Questions

Is childhood obesity too sensitive an issue?

Is there a current childhood obesity epidemic in Australia?

Will programs such as Crunch & Sip assist in the reduction of childhood obesity?

Is childhood obesity a concern?

slide18

Audio

We recommend the following websites as resources

Crunch and Sip

Go for 2 & 5

Healthy Harold

The Australian Guide to Healthy eating

Priority Health Areas.

One particular resources that we found invaluable was the The Crunch & Sip website. This resource is valuable for teachers addressing the health priority area of obesity.

The Crunch & Sip website explains the program and offers other nutritional programs that support healthy eating.

It has school and teacher resources explaining how to incorporate this program into your classroom. Furthermore, the crunch & sip website has information for parents/caregivers explaining why the crunch & sip program is beneficial to students. The website provides the opportunity to sign your school up to the program and order and download resources.

Crunch and Sip

http://www.crunchandsip.com.au/

Go for 2 & 5

www.gofor2and5.com.au

PDHPE Curriculum Support

http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/primary/pdhpe/index.htm

Healthy Harold

www.healthyharold.org.au

Recommended

Resources

Priority health Areas

http://www.aihw.gov.au/health-priority-areas/

The Australian Guide to healthy eating

http://www.health.gov.au/internet/healthyactive/publishing.nsf/Content/eating

slide19

Reference List

  • Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. (2012),‘Obesity’, Retrieved on July 10th 2012 from: http://www.aihw.gov.au/obesity-health-priority-area/
  • New South Wales Health (2007), ‘Crunch and Sip’, Retrieved on July 24th 2012 from: www.health.nsw.gov.au/news/2007
  • Be Skilled, Be Fit (2009), ‘School programs’, Retrieved on July 24th 2012 from: http://www.beskilledbefit.com.au/School-Programs.aspx
  • Better Health Chanel. (2010), ‘Obesity’, Retrieved on July 10th 2012 from: http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Obesity
  • Blue Mountains Gazette (2012), ‘Interactive: Obesity Map of the world’ Retrieved on July 10th 2012 from: http://www.bluemountainsgazette.com.au/specialfeature.aspx?id=6142
  • Board of Studies NSW. (1999). Personal Development, Health and Physical Education K-6 Syllabus, Sydney, Australia, B.O.S
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2012), ‘Overweight and Obesity’ and ‘Basics About Childhood Obesity’, Retrieved on July 10th 2012 from: http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/adult/defining.html
  • Medibank Private. (2010), ‘Obesity in Australia: financial impact and cost benefits intervention’, Retrieved on July 10th 2012 from: http://www.medibank.com.au/Client/Documents/Pdfs/Obesity_Report_2010.pdf
  • Microsoft Clip Art images 2010
  • Monash Obesity and Diabeties Institute. (2012), ‘Obesity in Australia’, Retrieved on July 10th 2012 from: http://www.modi.monash.edu.au/obesity-facts-figures/obesity-in-australia/
  • Peeters. A., Magliano. D. (2012), ‘Mapping Australia’s Collective Weight Gain’, Retrieved on July 10th 2012 from: http://theconversation.edu.au/mapping-australias-collective-weight-gain-7816
  • The heart Foundation (2012), Jump rope for heart’, Retrieved on July 24th 2012 from: http://www.heartfoundation.org.au/sites/jumpropeforheart/Pages/default.aspx
  • World Health Organisation. (2012), ‘Obesity and Overweight’, Fact Sheet No. 311, Retrieved on July 10th 2012 from: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs311/en/
  • Government of Western Australia Department of Health. (2005), 'Crunch and Sip', Retrieved July 12th 2012 from: http://www.crunchandsip.com.au/interface/controls/WhatIs/landing_WhatIs.asp