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CSE1320-002-Fall 2014 INTERMEDIATE PROGRAMMING. Dr. Sajib Datta CSE@UTA Aug 25, 2014. Course Syllabus. Instructor: Sajib Datta Office Location: ERB 336 Email Address: sajib.datta@mavs.uta.edu

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cse1320 002 fall 2014 intermediate programming

CSE1320-002-Fall 2014INTERMEDIATE PROGRAMMING

Dr. SajibDatta

CSE@UTA

Aug 25, 2014

course syllabus
Course Syllabus
  • Instructor: SajibDatta
    • Office Location: ERB 336
    • Email Address: sajib.datta@mavs.uta.edu
    • Web Site: http://crystal.uta.edu/~datta/teaching/cse1320-2fall2014/cse-1320-002-fall-2014.html
    • Office Hours: TuTh: 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
  • TA and his office hours: TBA
course syllabus course description
Course Syllabus-Course Description
  • Learn to program in C at a level beyond an introductory programming course.
  • Exposure to basic data structures
  • Learn the concept of object-oriented programming in C++
  • Learn to use the Linux operating system
course syllabus text book one of the two books will work as a reference
Course Syllabus-Text Book (One of the two books will work as a reference.)
  • W. D. Foster and L. S. Foster: C By Discovery (4th Edition)
  • Herbert Schildt: C: The Complete Reference (4th Edition)
  • http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/C_Programming
course syllabus labs and exams
Course Syllabus-Labs and Exams
  • All labs (5) will be posted on the course website and announced in class.
  • Each lab will be distributed one week before the due time.
  • No late Labs will be accepted except for university-excused absences with documentation submitted before or less than 3 calendar days after the due date.
  • Two exams and
  • Final exam
    • Comprehensive
course syllabus grading
Course Syllabus-Grading
  • Pop Quizzes 15%
  • Labs 30% (5 labs)
  • Exams 30% (2 midterms, 15% each)
  • Final Exam 25%
    • Final grades are based on the standard ranges of A: 90–100, B: 80–89, C: 70–79, D: 60–69, F: 0–59

Instructor reserves the right to change the distribution

to succeed in this course
To succeed in this course
  • Practice!!!
  • Test code (debug)
what s programming
What’s Programming
  • What is computer programming?
    • Interpretation of a task or algorithm in a computer language.
  • What is an algorithm?
    • A set of instructions for accomplishing a task.
    • Input and Output
what s programming1
What’s Programming
  • How about preparing salad?
    • Steps:
      • Clean and cut vegetables
      • Put sauce & cheese
      • Stir
what s programming an example
What’s Programming-An example
  • The algorithm for sorting three integers in ascending order, given 20, 5, 8.
  • Steps: 5, 8, 20
  • To determine the concrete steps involved in solving a problem, we may
    • Logically represent the problem
    • Implement the logic in computer languages (c, c++, java, python, perl…)
  • Given a thousand integers?
why programming
Why Programming
  • Manually operating – not possible
    • Google search engine (Searching in a File)
basic components of a computer
Basic Components of a Computer
  • CPU – central processing unit
  • RAM – random access memory
    • Computer data storage
    • Integrated circuits – randomly access with constant time
  • Permanent memory – hard disk
  • Computer peripheral – mouse, keyboard
programming platform
Programming Platform
  • For omega access, each student that needs to have access to it will need to contact the help desk and request it. The best way is to call them at 817-272-2208 and ask to have omega access added to your NetID account.
  • Visual Studio download information:
    • http://www.uta.edu/oit/cs/software/microsoft/visual-studio-2010/index.php
first example1
First Example
  • # include <stdio.h>
    • Tell compiler to include the information included in studio.h
  • int main( )
    • A function name
    • C programming consists of one or more functions (basic modules)
    • Parenthesis identify a function
    • Similar to the function defined in math
    • Arguments and return
  • /* a … */
    • Enclose comments (block), “//” – single line
    • Intended for the reader and ignored by the compiler
first example2
First Example
  • { - the beginning of the function body (statements separated by “;”)
  • int num;
    • A declaration statement
    • num is an identifier
    • Declare a variable before using it
    • Traditionally, declare it at the beginning
    • Lowercase letters, uppercase letters, digits, the underscore
    • First character must be a letter or an underscore
    • Not key words
first example3
First Example
  • num = 1;
    • an assignment statement
    • Set space in memory
    • Reassign later
  • printf(“ ”)
    • Part of the standard C library, a function
  • \n
    • Start a new line
first example4
First Example
  • %d
    • Placeholder/format specifier - where and in what form to print
  • return - a return statement of a function
  • } – the end of the function
a good program
A “Good” Program
  • There are different criteria by which one program may be considered better than another. Some examples are:
    • Readability – collaborative work
    • Maintainability – self-updated
    • Scalability – large-scale data set
    • Performance (e.g., how fast it runs or how much memory it uses)
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